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Full text of "Evening post annual ... : biographical sketches (with portraits) of the state officers, representatives in Congress, governor's staff, and senators and members of the General Assembly of the state of Connecticut"

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1895 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/evening1895unse 




t-— N 



THE ASSEMBLY BOOK 



— AND — 



CONNECTICUT PUBLIC REGISTER 

189^ 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 



[WITH PORTRAITS] 
OF THE 



State Officers, Representatives in Congress, Governor's 

Staff, and Senators and Members of the 

General Assembly 



OF THE 



. . STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



PUBLISHED BI-ANNUALLY 

(seventeenth veak) 



HARTFORD, CONN. 

EVENING POST ASSOCIATION 
1895 






TO THE PUBLIC 



FOR the tenth consecutive time The Post offers to the pubHc its handsome 
and complete compendium of the State Government, General Assembly, 
Delegation in Congress, and many other subjects in which our citizens 
are directly interested. The increasing popularity of this series is a sufficient 
proof of its merit, and so widely and favorably is it now known throughout 
Connecticut that the publication has come to be regarded as " the standard " 
— a fact appreciated by the highest class of advertisers. 

In acknowledgment of the general patronage of the past and as better 
indicating the magnitude which the present business has attained to, the pub- 
lishers have this year adopted a new and attractive title for the book, which 
clearly explains its purpose. All of the old features have, however, been 
retained, several new ones added, and the volume made considerably larger than 
ever before. Mechanical improvements in the form of superior press-work, 
fine paper and tasteful binding, can be seen at a glance ; while in the im- 
portant matter of illustrations, it is safe to say that perfection has been 
reached according to the present stage of the art. 

As no pains or expense has been spared to make "The Assembly Book" 
of 1895 something of which everyone connected with and represented in will 
be proud, and the reading public eager to possess, a wider sale than ever before 
is hoped for and predicted by 

Respectfully yours, 

THE PUBLISHERS. 

Hartford, Conn., 1895. 



12C03 



DOOR 



SOFA 



SENATE CHAMBER. 





REPORTERS 



ClerK 



LIEUT. 
GOV. 




REPORTERS 



ALPHABETICAL ROLL OF THE SENATE- 



[Republicans in Roman ; Democrats in Italics.l^ 



Dist. 


Name. 


Committees. 


Temporary Residence 
in Hartford. 


20 


Averill, Heman O. 


Agriculture; Canvass of Votes for Justices of Peace, 


Hotel Hartford. 


15 


Bernd, Henry 


Humane Institutions; Putnam Memorial Camp, 


.Allyn House. 


4 


Birge, John 


Manufactures, 




1H 


Chandler, R. H. 


Contested Elections; Eng"d Bills; Judicial Nom's, 


Allyn House. 


21 


Chapman, Chas. E. 


Fisheries, 


Hotel Capitol. 


3 


Coffey, Charles 


Railroads, 


Allyn House. 


2 


Crosby. A. O. 


Forfeited Rights; Military .Affairs, 


.. 


7 


Dayton, J. D. 


Labor; School Fund; Unfinished Business, 


Hotel Heublein. 


13 


Ferris, J. H. 


Banks, 


Allyn House. 


24 


Fuller, Edward E. 


Insurance: Manual and Roll, 


,. 


11 


Gates, Wm. F. 


Temperance, 


United States Hotel. 


1 


Hail, John H. 


Contested Elec; Eng'd Bills; Public Health; Sta. Lib'y, 


m Wethersfield Ave. 


17 


Hunt, Claramon 


Roads, Bridges and Rivers, 


.\llyn House. 


8 


Johnson, L. H. 


Const. Amend. Exec. Nominations; Sale of Lands, 


Hotel Hartford. 





Lee, Benj. H. 


Appropriations; New Counties and Countj- Seats, 


Allyn House. 


23 


Little, James P. 


Federal Relations; New Towns and Prob. Districts, 


378 Farmington Ave. 


12 


Lounsbury, <i. E. 


Finance, 


Allyn House. 


14 


Marigold, W. H. 


Cities and Boroughs; Joint Rules; Senate Rules, 


" 


6 


Mix, John W. 


Claims; Executive Nominations, Clerks, 


Hotel Hartford. 


10 


Palmer, W. H. Jr. 


Education; Woman Suffrage, 


Allyn House. 


22 


* PickerinpT, T. R. 


Capitol Furniture and Grounds, 


Hotel Heublein. 


18 


Smith, G. \V. 


Executive Nomination; State Prison, 


Hotel Hartford. 


Ifl 


Warner, D. T. 


Contested Elections; Judiciary, 


,. 


5 


Webster, D. F. 


Incorporations, 





♦Died February 21, IS'.«. 



Succeeded by John M. Douglas. 
U 



SENATE OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



JANUARY SESSION, 1896. 



Lieut. -Governor LORRIN A. COOKE, /-., President. 
Senator JOHN H. FERRIS, President pro. tern. 



Q 


Name. 


Pol. 


Residence. 


Age. 


Birth-Place. 


Occupation. 


IMarried or 
Single. 


- 
P. 0. Address. 


1 


JOHN H. HALL d. 


Hartford 


45 


Portland 


Manufacturer 


Married 


Hartford 


2 


ALEMBERT O. CROSBY r 




E. Glastonbury 


46 


Glastonbury 


Manufacturer 


Married 


E. Glastonbury, J 


3 


CHARLES COFFEY r 


iGranby 


43 


Granby 


Farmer 


Married 


Granby,/' 


4 


JOHN BIRGE >■ 




Bristol 


41 


Bristol 


Manufacturer 


Married 


Bristol 


5 


DANIEL F. WEBSTER r 




Waterbury 


41 


Litchfield 


Lawyer 


Married 


Waterbury 


6 


JOHN W. MIX r 




Wallingford 


44 


Cheshire 


Manufacturer 


Married 


Yalesville.r 


7 'JOHNSON D. DAYTON r 




Derby 


49 


New Milfnrd 


Merchant 


Married 


Derby 


8 LYMAN H. JOHNSON r 




New Haven 


49 


Wallingford 


Blacksmith 


Married 


New Haven 


9i BENJAMIN H. LEE r 




New London 


41 


New London 


Real Estate 


Married 


New London 


10 


WM. H. PALMER, Jr. r 




Norwich 


50 


Montville 


Superint'dent 


Single 


Norwich, (/ 


11 


WILLIAM F. GATES* r 




Lebanon 


58 


Windham 


Farmer 


Married 


Willimantic.f 


13 


GEO. E. LOUNSBURY r 


Ridgefield 


56 


Poundri'ge, N. Y. 


Manufacturer 


Married 


Ridgefield 


13 


JOHN H. FERRIS r 


So. Norvvalk 


51 


Darien 


Merchant 


Married 


So. Norwalk,/ 


14 


WM. H. MARIGOLD r 


Bridgeport 


36 


Waterbury 


Emp. Printer 


Married 


Bridgeport 


15 


HENRY BERND r 


Danbury 


57 


AUentown, Pa. 


None 


Married 


Danbury 


16 


RAND'PH H. CHANDLER r 


Thompson 


41 


Thompson 


Lawyer 


Married 


Thompson, J,' 


17 


CLARAMON HUNT ;- 


Sterling 


52 


Blackstone, Ms. 


Manufacturer 


Married 


Sterling,/; 


18 


GEORGE W. SMITH r 


New Hartford 


45 


Pine Meadow 


Manufacturer 


Married 


New Hartford,/ 


19 


DONALD T. WARNER r 


Salisbury 


43 


Salisbury 


Atty. at Law 


Married 


Salisbury 


20 


HEMAN O. AVERILL r 


Washington 


38 


Washington 


Farmer 


Married 


Wash. Depot.y 


21 


CHARLES E. CHAPMAN r 


Westbrook 


41 


Westbrook 


Farmer 


Married 


Westbrook,/?" 


22 


THOS. R. PICKERINGf r 


Portland 


63 


M'chester, Eng. 


Manufacturer 


Married 


Portland 


23 


JAMES P. LITTLE r 


Columbia 


52 


Columbia 


Farmer 


Married 


Columbia,/ 


24 


EDWARD E. FULLER r 

1 


Tolland 

1 


41 


Tolland 


Insurance Single 


Tolland 



a House, 1891. b House, 1891; Senate, 1893. c House, 1883. d House, 1893. e House, 1877, 1883. /House, 
1887, 1889; Senate, 1893. g House, 1879, 1880. // House, 1893. /, House, 1880. / House, 1891. k House, 1889, 
1891. /House, 1891. 



* In place of Clark W. Reynolds of Griswold, unseated. \ Died February 21, 1895. 

Republicans, 23. Democrats, i. 



OFFICERS OF THE SENATE. 

CUERK. 

ANDREW F. GATES, ;., Lawyer, Hartford. 

CHAPLAIN.— The Ri.v. HENRY M. THOMPSON, Hartford. 

MESSENGERS.— JOHN L. WILSON, of Suflield, and J. W. MOODY, of Seymour. 

DOORKEEPERS.— JOHN R. COGSWELL, of Putnam; C. H. CHAPMAN, of Westbrook; W. P. HAYES, 

of Bethlehem; WILLIAM HUMPHRIES, of Danbury; BURT H. RIX, of Tolland. 
JANITOR OF SENATE CLOAK-ROOM.— S. H. REEVES, of Norwich. 



STATE OFFICIALS AND CLERKS. 



Name. 



O. VINCENT COFFIN. 



Pol. Residence. Age. Birth-Place. Occupation. 

GOVERNOR. 

r., Middletown, 57 Mansfield, N. Y., Pres. Ins. Co. 



Married or 
Single. 



P. 0. Address. 



Married, Middletown. 



FRANK D. HAINES, 



Executive Secretary. 

r. , Middletown, 29 Colchester, Lawyer, 



Married, Middletown. 



FRANK D. ROOD, 



r. , Hartford, 



Chief Clerk. 

43 Hartford, 



Clerk, 



Married, Hartford. 



LORRIN A. COOKE, 



LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR. 

r., Barkhamsted, 62 N. Marlbo'gh, Ms. Manufacturer, Married, Riverton. 



WILLIAM C. MOWRY, r., Norwich, 



SECRETARY. 
44 Norwich, 



Manufacturer, Single, Norwich. 



ROBINSON S. HINMAN, r., Oxford, 
RICHARD J. DWYER, d., Hartford, 

WILLIAM CARUTHERS, r., Norwich, 



Clerks. 

57 Oxford, Farmer, Married, Stevenson. 

43 Northamp., Ms., Clerk, Single, Hartford. 

51 Norwich, Clerk, Married, Norwich. 



GEORGE W. HODGE, r., Windsor, 



TREASURER. 

48 Seymour, 



Manufacturer, Married, Rainbow. 



Clerks. 

B. FRANK MARSH, r.. West Winsted, 52 Dayton, O., Clerk, Married, W. Winsted. 

HARRY L. HILTON, r., Hartford, 21 Hartford, Clerk, Single, Hartford. 

CHAS. F. SUMNER, Jr., d., Bolton, 30 Bolton, Clerk, Single, Bolton. 



COMPTROLLER. 
BENJAMIN P. MEAD, r., New Canaan, 46 Bridgeport, 



Merchant, Married, New Canaan. 



E. W. MOORE, 
JOHN H. WADHAMS, 



Clerks. 
Talcottville, 50 Windsor, 



d., Goshen, 



54 Goshen, 



Clerk, 
Farmer, 



Married, 
Married, 



Talcottville. 
Goshen. 



Superintendent of State Capitol and Assistant. 

CHARLES H. BUTLER, r., Oxford, 50 Seymour. Merchant, 



BENJ. C. McKENNEY, r., Greenwich, 29 Darien, 



Clerk, 



Married, 
Married, 



Oxford. 
Greenwich. 



CHARLES P. GRAHAM, r. 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL. 

Middletown, 55 Utica, N. Y., Dentist, 



Married, Middletown. 



WM. E. F. LANDERS, 



Assistant Adjutant-General. 

;-., New London, 47 Brooklyn, N. Y., Merchant, 



WALTER PEARCE, 
THERON C. SWAN, 



r., Hartford, 
d., Hartford, 
LORENZO D.CONVERSE, r., Windsor, 



Clerks. 

55 Bristol, R. I. 
50 Akron, O., 
47 Somers, 



Clerk, 
Clerk, 
Clerk, 



Married, New London. 



Widower, 

Married, 

Married, 



Hartford. 
Hartford. 
Windsor. 



STATE OFFICIALS AND CLERKS. 



Name. 



Pol. Residence. 



Age. 



Birth-Place. 



Occupation. 



QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL. 
WILLIAM E. DISBROW, r., Bridgeport, 50 Brookfield, Real Estate, 



Married or 
Single. 



P. 0. Address. 



Married, Bridgeport. 



LOUIS R. CHENEY, 



Assistant Quartermastf.r-Gexeral. 
r., Hartford, 3.5 So. Manchester, Real Estate, 



Married, Hartford. 



M. J. WISE, 



d., Hartford, 



Clerk. 

44 Boston, Mass. 



Clerk, 



Single, Hartford. 



JEREMIAH OLNEY, 



COMMISSIONER OF SCHOOL FUND. 
r., Hartford, 76 Thompson, 



Married, Hartford. 



CARNOT O. SPENCER, r., Hartford, 
WILLIAM H. POND, </., Milford, 



Clerks. 

62 Saybrook, Clerk, Married, Hartford. 

49 New York City, Clerk, Married, Hartford. 



INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 
BURTON MANSFIELD, d., New Haven, 38 Hamden, Lawyer, 

[Fred'k a. Betts, r.. New Haven. From July 1, 1895.] 



Single, New Haven. 



Actuary and Clerks. 
JOSEPH H. SPRAGUE, d., Hartford, 65 Greenfield, Ms., Actuary, 



THERON UPSON, 
ARTHUR A. WILSON, 
GEORGE I. ROGERS, 



r., Kensington, 59 Wolcott, Bookkeeper, 

r., Hartford, 39 Willimantic, Clerk, 

d., Milford, 52 Milford, Clerk, 



Married, 
Married, 
Married, 
Single, 



Hartford. 
Hartford. 
Hartford. 
Hartford. 



RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS. 

GEORGE M. WOODRUFF, d., Litchfield, .58 Litchfield, Lawyer, 

WILLIAM O. SEYMOUR, r., Ridgefield, 61 Ridgefield, Civil Engineer, 



ALEX. C. ROBERTSON, d., Montville, 



45 Norwich, 



Paper Manuf'r, 



Married, 
Married, 
Single, 



Litchfield. 

Ridgefield. 

Montville. 



HENRY F. BILLINGS, 



Hartford, 



Clerk. 

34 Glastonbury 



Clerk, 



Married, Hartford. 



EDWARD R. DOYLE, 
EDWIN A. BUCK, 



BANK COMMISSIONERS. 
d., Hartford, 25 Bridgeport, Publisher, 



(/. , Willimantic, 62 Ashford, 



Merchant, 



Single, 
Married, 



Hartford. 
Willimantic. 



CHAS. D. HINE, 



SECRETARY STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

r., Hartford, 49 Fair Haven, Vt., Teacher, 



Married, Hartford. 



ASAHEL J. WRIGHT, r., Killingly, 



Clerk. 
40 Foster, R. I., 



Clerk, 



Married, Hartford. 



ROBERT J. VANCE, 



COMMISSIONER OF LABOR STATISTICS. 
d., New Britain, 40 New York, Editor, 



Married, New Britain. 



GEORGE E. BEARN, 



Clerk. 
d., New Haven, 41 Torrington, 



Editor, 



Married, New Haven. 



CHAS. J. HOADLEY, 



STATE LIBRARIAN. 

Hartford, 66 Hartford, Librarian, 



Single, Hartford. 



REPRESENTATIVES HALL. 



Sofa 




ALPHABETICAL ROLL OF THE HOUSE. 

[Republicans in Roman; Democrats in Italics.^ 



3 6 
1 2 

3 7 



Names. 



Towns. 



Committees. 



Temporary Residence 
in Hartford. 



176 

198 
110 
166 
117 
213 

30 
148 
149 
115 
170 
132 

71 
220 
106 
113 
169 

44 
201 



Alderman, S. 
A Uric h, F.J. 
Alien, S.J. 
Allen, T. H. 
Alvord, W. E. 
Atvvell, W. R. 
Backus, C. L. 
Bacon, F. ir. 
Bailey, C. 
Bailey, J. F. 
Bailey, S. M. 
Balch, G. O. 
Barber, W. R. 
Barnes, A. G. 
Barrett, R. W. 
Battev, W. W. 
Beach, T. B. 
Bidwell, G. E. 
Bingham, R. W. 



City Hotel, 



90 Church St. 



Burlington, Woman Suffrage, 

Union, New Towns and Probate Districts, 

East Windsor, Judicial Nominations, 

Sprague, Military Affairs (Chairman), 

Bolton, Incorporations, 

Durham, New Towns and Probate Districts, 

Andover, Education, 

Scotland, New Counties and County Seats, 

Bethel, Public Health, 

Groton, Canvass Votes J. of P. Claims, 

Wolcott, Woman Suffrage, 

Ashford, Roads, Bridges and Rivers, 

Putnam, Humane Institutions, 

New Milford, Fed. Relations, Put. Mem. Camp. 

Hartford, School Fund, 

Columbia, Humane Institutions, 

Seymour, Claims (Clerk), 

East Granby, Temperance, 

East Haddam, Railroads, 



10 



ALPHABETICAL ROLL OF THE HOUSE. 



Names. 



Towns, 



Committees. 



Temporary Residence 
in Hartford. 



4 


8 


247 


2 


3 


56 


1 


4 


102 


1 


3 


70 


4 


3 


75 


3 


3 


51 


4 


5 


151 


3 


5 


137 


4 


5 


145 


3 


1 


3 


4 


4 


105 


2 


7 


218 


1 


7 


226 


4 


3 


37 


3 


5 


126 


1 


3 


68 


1 


5 


150 


4 


7 


227 


2 


5 


136 


1 


6 


196 


1 


3 


76 


4 


7 


225 


1 


1 


16 


2 


7 


206 


1 


4 


112 


4 


2 


33 


3 


5 


129 



2 


27 


5 


164 


5 


138 


8 


239 


5 


134 


2 


28 


6 177 


4 99 


5 


152 



4 

229 

165 

58 

59 

52 

27 

64 

38 

39 

34 

28 

77 

99 

52 

13 

61 

246 

204 

232 

55 

Spr. 

123 

212 

40 

183 

69 

18 

160 

230 

109 

195 

173 

163 

203 

234 

205 

65 

101 



Bird, F. H. 
Bixby, G. T. 
Blackman, S. A. 
Booth, A. M. 
Boss, C. R. 
Bovven, A. J. 
Bradford, G. L. 
Brewer, J. M. 
Brockett, E. H. 
Brown, H. C. 
Buckingham, C. 
Buckley, G. E. 
Bugbee, J . F. 
Burnham, R. M. 
Bushnell, G. A. 
Campbell, P. 
Carrier, J. A. 
Catlin, H. H. 
Chaffee, S. E. 
Champlin, J. S. 
Chapman, A. A. 
Cheney, W. C. 
Clark, A.M. 
Clark, C. H. 
Clark, E. H. 
Clark, G. M. 
Clark, J. H. 
Close, J. F. 
Coates, G. F. 
Converse, J. C. 
Corttis, E. H. 
Cowell, G. H. 
Dav, F. 
Dayton, H. T. 
Deming, C. H. 
Dempsey, E. C. 
Douglas, E. A. 
Downer, W. F. 
DuBon, J. A. 
Dudley, E. 
Eaton, R. O. 
Eldredge, A. H. 
Elliott, L. 
*Elmer, T. 
Ely, J. G. 
Everett, A. C. 
Fahey, J. E. 
Fairchild, H. L. 
Fessenden, S. 
Finch, G. T. 
Ford, C. E. 
Francis, A. P. 
Froidevaux, C. F. 
Fuller, D. S. 
Gabb, G. D. 
Gallup, M. E. 
Garlick, C. B. 
Georgia, C. C. 
Gillette, C. O. 
Gillette, J. R. 
Gladding, G. S. 
Goodrich, E. S. 
Goodwin, D. T. 
Gould, E. 
Goulden, J. D. 
Granniss, C. W. 



Pomfret, 

Thompson, 

Newtown, 

New Milford, 

New London, 

Windham, 

Canterbury, 

Norwich, 

Simsbury, 

Colchester, 

Fairfield, 

Sharon, 

Old Lyme, 

South Windsor, 

Old Saybrook, 

Newtown, 

Chatham, 

Harwinton, 

Derby, 

Coventry, 

Preston, 

Manchester, 

Cornwall, 

Southington, 

Morris, 

Haddam, 

Essex, 

Greenwich, 

N. Stonington, 

Stafford, 

Thompson, 

Waterbury, 

Brooklyn, 

Watertown, 

Colebrook, 

Danbury, 

Sterling, 

Hamden, 

Windsor, 

Guilford, 

North Haven, 

Wilmington, 

New Haven, 

Middletown, 

Lyme, 

Barkhamsted, 

Vernon, 

Trumbull, 

-Stamford, 

Enfield, 

Canaan, 

Newington, 

Avon, 

Suffield, 

Bloomfield, 

Ashford, 

Woodbury, 

Farmington, 

Haddam, 

New Hartford, 

Chester, 

Wethersfield, 

Woodstock, 

Easton, 

Stamford, 

East Haven, 



Insurance, 

Banks, 

Cities and Boroughs, 

Humane Institutions, 

Incorporations (Clk.), Put. Mem. Camp 

Jud. Jt. Rules (Chm.) H. R's (Clk.), 

Const. Amend. (House), 

Claims (Chairman), 

Insurance, 

Manufactures, 

Agriculture, 

Manufactures, 

Forfeited Rights, 

Federal Relations, 

Cities and Boroughs, 

Claims, 

Unfinished Business, 

Woman Suffrage, 

Military Affairs, 

Canvass Votes Justice of Peace, 

Sale of Lands, 

Military Affairs (Clerk), 

Manufactures, 

Manufactures, 

Const. Amend. (House), 

Insurance (Chairman), 

Const. Amend. (House), 

Military Affairs, 

New Towns and Probate Districts, 

Appropriations (Chairman), 

Educ. (Clk.) Man'l and Roll (Chm.), 

Judiciary, Judicial Noms. (Chm.), 

Agriculture (Chairman), 

Agriculture (Clerk), 

Temperance, 

Incorporations, Rules (House), 

Appropriations, Can. Votes J. of P., 

Incorporations, 

Agriculture, 

Const. Amend, Joint, 

Railroads, Assign, of Seats (Clk.), 

School Fund (Clerk), 

Manufactures, 

Judiciary (Chairman), 

Public Health, 

Forfeited Rights, j 

Cities and Boroughs, 

Jt. Rules (Clk.), Judicial Nominations,! 

Public Health (Clerk), 

Insurance, 

Finance, 

Sale of Land, 

Humane Institutions, 

Contingent Expenses, Railroads, 

Sale of Lands, 

Capitol Furniture and Grounds, 

Fisheries, 

School Fund, 

New Counties and County Seats, 

Manufactures, 

Judiciary, (Chm.), 

Capitol Furniture and Grounds, 

School Fund, 

Incorporations, 

Temperance, 



96 Trumbull St. 



Park View Hotel 



90 Church St. 



96 Trumbull St. 



Hotel Capitol. 



14 Trinity St. 



27 Niles St. 
14 Trinity St. 



* Resigned — Appointed Judge of Superior Court. 



ALPHABETICAL ROLL OF THE HOUSE. 



i 


1 


i 


Names. 


Towns. 


Committees. 


Temporary Residence 
in Hartford. 


1 


8 


244 


Gray, C.A. 


Ledyard, 


Woman Suffrage, 

Const. Amend. House (Chm.), 




3 


4 


95 


Greene, G., Jr. 


Norwich, \ 


Judiciary, 




1 


3 


63 


Cunn, G. M. 


Milford, j 


Con. Amend. Jt., Cont. Elec. (House), 
Judiciary, Woman Suffrage (Chm.), 




1 


6 


194 


Hale, A. H. 


Portland, 


Manufactures (Clerk), 




2 


4 


82 


Hall, G. H. 


Bristol, 


Manufactures (Chairman), 




3 


5 


119 


Hall W. H. 


Willington, 


Railroads (Clerk), 




3 


2 


29 


Hall, \V. L. 


Waterbury, 


Banks, 




3 


6 


171 


Hammond, B. D. 


Cromwell, 


Agriculture, 




3 


8 


237 


Harvey, W. E. 


Colchester, 


Cities and Boroughs, 




3 


7 


217 


Hemingway, W. J. 


Plainville, 


State Librar)' (Clerk), 




1 


4 


98 


Hicks, R. 


Tolland, -j 


Const. Amend. House, 
Judiciary, State Library (Chm.), 




1 


5 


146 


Hill, G. P. 


East Lyme, 


Judicial Nominations, 




4 


7 


233 


Hitchcock, L. 


Woodbridge, 


Federal Relations, 




1 


5 


156 


Hodge, H. E. 


Marlborough, 


Canvass Votes Justice of the Peace, 




1 


5 


154 


Holhrook, C. W. 


Windsor Locks, 


Bank, 




3 


7 


223 


Holmes, F. E. 


Rocky Hill, 


Joint Rules, 




2 


4 


86 


Hopkins, G. C. 


Warren, 


Temperance, 




1 


1 


20 


Hough, J. R. 


Wallingford, 


Agriculture, 




3 


4 


85 


Hull, E. O. 


Monroe, 


Engrossed Bills (Chm.), Railroads, 




3 


7 


211 


Hull, H. C. 


Clinton, 


Insurance, 




2 


4 


88 


Hungerford, F. 


Sherman, 


Fisheries, 




3 


4 


87 


Hunt, N. C. 


Chaplin, 


State Prison, 




2 


5 


120 


Jackson, F. R. 


Woodstock, 


Railroads, 


94 Hudson St. 


3 


5 


133 


Jacobs, F. A. 


Killingly, j 


Military Affairs, 

New Towns and Probate Dists. (Chm.), 


r AUyn House. 


3 


7 


207 


Jeralds, S. E. 


Cheshire, 


Capitol Furniture and Grounds, 




3 


5 


135 


Jones, A. F. 


New Canaan, 


Capitol Furniture and Grounds (Chm.), 




4 


5 


161 


Johnson, G. T. 


Norfolk, 


Public Health, 




3 


6 


175 


Jones, H. G. 


Saybrook, 


Roads, Bridges, and Rivers, 




4 


4 


97 


Judson, S., Jr. 


Stratford, \ 


Judiciary, Cont. Elec. (Chm.), 
Const. Amend. Joint (Chm.), 




3 


4 


93 


Keeler, E. 0. 


Norwalk, 


Banks (Chm.), 




3 


6 


167 


Keeney, O. 


Somers, 


Finance, 




2 


3 


50 


Keller, C. 


Bridgeport, 


Temperance (Clk.), Cont. Expen. 




2 


4 


94 


Kenney, D. 


Washington, 


Can. Votes J. of P. (Chm.), Claims, 


Hotel Capitol. 


2 


4 


92 


Kenney, G. 


Litchfield, 


Rules Joint, 


Hotel Hartford. 


2 


2 


26 


Kingman, S. C. 


Washington, 


Military Affairs, 




2 


4 


84 


Kinlock, W. G. 


New Britain, 


State Prison (Chairman), 




3 


6 


185 


Lacey, M. B. 


Fairfield, 


Education, 




2 


4 


96 


La Place, R. P. 


Lyme, 


Labor, 




4 


2 


41 


Lathrop, C. H. 


Franklin, 


Insurance, 




1 


4 


114 


Lathrop, P. L. 


Coventry, 


Federal Relations (Clerk), 




1 


4 


100 


Lee, J. 


Brookfield, 


State Prison, 




2 


1 


8 


Lewis, C. R. 


Middletown, 


Con. Amend. Jt., Put. Mem. Camp, 




1 


5 


162 


Lewis, J. P. 


Farmington, 


Woman Suffrage, 




4 


1 


19 


Lewis, \V. I. 


Westbrook, 


Joint Rules, Judicial Nominations, 


32 Buckingham. 


4 


3 , 


63 


Lincoln, W. H. 


Hampton, 


New Counties and County Seats, 


94 Hudson St. 


2 


6 


184 


Linsley, J. J. 


North Branford, 


State Prison, 




3 


4 


91' 


Lord, E. E. 


Killingworth, -' 


Contingent Expenses (Chairman), 
Forfeited Rights, Judicial Noms. 




2 


4 


80 


Lounsbury, C. W. 


Darien, 


Humane Institutions, 




4 


8 


249 


Loveland, C. S. 


Glastonbury, 


Capitol Furniture and Grounds, 




3 


5 


125 


Lucas, D. N. 


Goshen, 


Forfeited Rights, 


• 


1 


4 


104 


Main, A. 


Preston, 


Federal Relations, 




4 


2 


43 


Main, A. M. 


N. Stonington, 


Temperance, 




4 


5 


147 


Mansfield, H. P. 


Reddington, 


Insurance, Putnam Mem'l Camp, 




2 


7 


224 


Marcy, G. B. 


Eastford, 


School Fund, 




1 


3 


66 


Markham, E. A. 


Durham, 


Labor, 




3 


4 


89 


Marsh, E. W. 


Bridgeport, 


Assign't of Seats (Chm.), Finance, 




1 


7 


228 


Marsh, IV. r. 


Litchfield, 


Education, Engrossed Bills, 




3 


6 


181 


Mayberry, F. H. 


East Hartford, 


Public Health, 




4 


1 


17 


McCall, H. 


Lebannon, 


School Fund, 




1 


1 


12 


McCarthy, IV. H. 


Naugatuck, 


Forfeited Rights, 





Vi 



ALPHABETICAL ROLL OF THE HOUSE. 





1 


(A5 


Names. 


Towns. 


Committees. 


Temporary Residence 
in Hartford. 


2 


6 


182 


Mead, M. H. 


Ridgefield, 


Canvass of V^otes J. of P., Claims, 


32 Buckingham. 


2 


6 


174 


Mead, S. 


Greenwich, 


Cap. Furn. and Gds., St. Library, 




2 


2 


22 


Middleton, J. 


Enfield, 


Labor (Chairman), 




1 


2 


34 


Miller, E. B. 


Killingly, 


Education, 




1 


5 


142 


Miller, G. IV. 


East Windsor, 


Military Affairs, 




3 


7 


215 


Mills, L. A. 


Middlefield, 


Finance, 




3 


5 


121 


Mitchell, D. M. 


Southbury, 


New Counties and County Seats, 




1 


5 


158 


Morgan, A. 


Salem, 


Agriculture, 




3 


6 


179 


Morgan, L. B. 


Plainfield, 


Constitutional Amendments, Joint, 




1 


2 


42 


Morrill, J. S. 


Meriden, 


Labor, 




4 


3 


77 


Mundry, P. 


Salisbury, 


School Fund, 


Hotel Hartford, 


2 


8 


240 


Munger, M. H. 


Madison, 


Fisheries, 


16 Spring St. 


4 


1 


11 


Newton, H. G. 


New Haven, 


House Rules (Chm.), 
Humane Institutions (Chm.), 




3 


3 


57 


Newton, W. H. 


Wallingford, 


School Fund (Chm.), 




3 


7 


209 


Noyes, H. B., Jr. 


Stonington, 


Banks, 




4 


5 


155 


Ogden, G. W. 


Wilton, 


New Towns and Pro. Dist. (Clk.), 


90 Church St. 


1 


6 


188 


*Orton, L. E. 


Danbury, 


Labor, 




1 


4 


118 


shorn, C. E. 


Hartland, 


Manual and Roll, 




3 


3 


47 


Page, B. 


Meriden, 


Insurance (Clerk), 




3 


7 


221 


Page, B. F. 


Harwinton, 


Roads, Bridges and Rivers, 




3 


4 


83 


Parker, T. L. 


Saybrook, 


Appropriations (Clerk), 




4 


8 


73 


Parmelee, F. H. 


New London, 


Appropriations, Joint Rules, 


Hotel Hartford 


3 


5 


127 


Parmelee, N. L. 


Killingworth, 


Fisheries, 




2 


6 


178 


Patten, N. A. 


Somers, 


Sale of Lands, 




4 


5 


153 


Peck, H. F. 


Bethany, 


Sale of Lands, 




2 


6 


168 


Pendleton, J. 


Stonington, 


Railroads, 




1 


3 


74 


Potter, J. 


Griswold, 


Cap. Fn. & Gds., Unfin. Bus. (Clk.), 


Hotel Capitol. 


2 


7 


202 


Randle, L. W. 


Redding, 


Const. Amend. (House), 




2 


5 


122 


Range, 0. J. 


Guilford, 


Education, 




4 


8 


245 


Reed, C. 


Granby, 


New Counties and County Seats, 


Arlington House. 


2 


5 


130 


Remington, G. W. 


Colebrook, 


Judicial Nominations, 




2 


5 


124 


Reynolds, C. A. 


Bristol, 


Appropriations, 




2 


7 


208 


Robbins, F. H. 


Wethersfield, 


State Prison (Clerk), 




1 


4 


108 


Roberts, C. IV. 


East Hartford, 


Finance, 


370 Asylum St. 


3 


1 


1 


Roberts, J. E. 


Lisbon, 


Roads, Bridges, and Rivers, 




4 


6 


193 


Roberts, J. L. 


Kent, 


Labor, 




3 


2 


31 


Roraback, A. T. 


No. Canaan, 


Judiciary (Clk), Sale Lands (Chm.), 




2 


7 


214 


Roraback, W. A. 


Torrington, j 


Cont. Elec. (Clk.), Finance (Clk.), 
Putnam Memorial Camp, 




3 


8 


235 


Rouse, G. W. 


Voluntown; 


Military Affairs, 


Hotel Capitol. 


2 


3 


48 


Rowan, R. H. 


Norwalk, 


Finance (Chairman), 




4 


7 


231 


Ruick, J. W. 


Granby, 


Fed. Rel., New Towns and Pro. Dist., 




1 


2 


36 


Russell, E. C. 


Orange, 


Const. Amendments (House), 


^ 


1 


2 


46 


Sanborn, H. L. 


Canton, 


Claims, 




2 


1 


10 


Sanford, G. P. 


Oxford, 


New Towns and Pro. Districts, 




4 


5 


157 


Saunders, W. C. 


Waterford, 


Humane Institutions (Clerk), 




2 


6 


172 


Seymour, H. M. 


New Hartford, 


Sale of Lands, 




2 


7 


210 


Sheldon, E. D. 


Branford, 


Federal Relations, 


58 Oak St. 


4 


5 


139 


Shelton, G. A. 


Huntington, 


Public Health (Chairman), 




1 


6 


190 


Smit/i, A. B. 


Pomfret, 


Fisheries, 




4 


2 


35 


Smith, C. H. 


Groton, 


Fisheries (Chairman), 




1 


3 


78 


Smith, H. iV. 


Middlebury, 


Canvass Votes Justice of Peace, 




4 


5 


159 


Smith, J. O. 


Canterbury, 


Public Health. 




4 


5 


141 


Smith, W. B. 


Winchester, 


Railroads (Chairman), 




2 


7 


222 


Somers, D. L. 


Woodbury, 


Joint Rules, 


27 Niles St. 


3 


8 


243 


Southworth, L. E. 


Southington, 


Banks, 




2 


6 


186 


Spaulding, J. E. 


Winchester, 


Incorporations, 


Hotel Hartford. 


2 


8 


238 


Squire, F. A. 


Roxbury, 


Canvass Votes Justice of Peace, 




2 


5 


128 


Stanard, O. H. 


Norfolk, 


Woman Suffrage, 




3 


2 


21 


Starr, V. P. 


Chatham, 


Temperance (Chairman), 




3 


3 


49 


Sternberg, A. C. 


West Hartford, 


Roads, Bridges, and Rivers (Chm.), 




3 


2 


25 


Stoughton, F. 


Bethlehem 


Claims, 




3 


5 


131 


Stoughton, H. E. 


Plymouth, 


Banks, (Clerk), 




2 


2 


24 


Sumner, W. 


Tolland, 


New Coun. and Co. Seats (Chm.), 




4 


4 


111 


Swan, F. W. 


East Haddam, 


State Prison, 





♦Peoples. 



13 



ALPHABETICAL ROLL OF THE HOUSE. 



3 


1 


6 


4 


8 


67 


4 


6 


197 


2 


8 


242 


1 


8 


248 


2 


3 


54 


o 


1 





4 


4 


103 


2 


4 


90 


3 


1 


1 


2 


6 


180 


1 


1 


14 


3 


7 


219 


2 


7 


216 


2 


8 


236 


1 


8 


250 


4 


6 


199 


3 


1 


5 


2 


2 


32 


3 


2 


23 


4 


6 


189 


1 


3 


64 


3 


1 


9 


4 


8 


251 


3 


3 


53 




2 


38 




4 


116 




5 


144 




2 


45 




5 


143 




6 


200 




1 


15 




4 


81 




4 


107 




8 


241 




4 


79 




3 


60 




6 


187 




2 


39 




6 


191 




5 


140 




6 


192 




3 


72 



Names. 



Towns. 



Committees. 



I Temporar>' Residence 
I in Hartford. 



Taber, A. P. 
Talcott, H. G. 
Talmage, G. L. 
Tennant, G. C. 
Terrell, E. L. 
Thomas, A. 
Thompson, J. 
Tibbals, F. L 
Tucker, R. H. 
Turnbull, A. 
Turner, R. E. 
T7i.'itcliell, F. M. 
L'pson, W. H. 
Vaill, J. P. 
Van Alstyne, L. 
Vinton, F. O. 
Wadsworth, P. 
Wakeman, R. 
Wall, E. 
Wallace, G. 
Walter, J. D. 
IVaiizer, H. L. 
Warner, E. M. 
Warner, W. J. 
Washburn, J. R. 
Watrous, W\ H. 
JVav, W.J. 
Webster, E. W. 
Weeks, C. H. 
Welch, C. T. 
Wheeler, H. K. 
Wheeler, ]. H. 
White, E."P. 
Whitehead, S. 
Whitney, G. H. 
Whiton, F. H. 
Williams, D. W. 
Williams, H. 
Wilson, F. M. 
Wood, G. N. 
Wood, H. H. 
Wooster, E. R. 
Yutzler, F. W. 



Plainfield, 

Vernon, 

Prospect, 

Hebron, 

Beacon Falls, 

Thomaston, 

Ellington, 

Milford, 

Ansonia, 

Xew Britain, 

Lebanon, 

Xaugatuck, 

Berlin, 

Goshen, 

Sharon, 

Mansfield, 

Suffield, 

Westport, 

Torrington, 

Union, 

Cheshire, 

Xew Fairfield, 

Putnam, 

Hebron, 

Stafford, 

Hartford, 

Bozrah, 

Ansonia, 

Mansfield, 

Windsor, 

W^eston, 

Hartland, 

Ridgefield, 

Simsbury, 

Barkhamsted, 

Manchester, 

Glastonbury, 

Salisbury, 

Windham, 

Montville, 

Derby, 

Bridgewater, 

Cornwall, 



Fisheries (Clerk), Hotel Capitol. 

Banks, j 

Forfeited Rights, 

Forfeited Rights, 

Woman Suffrage, I 

Appropriations, Unfin. Bus. (Chm.), 

Agriculture, 

Cities and Boroughs (Clerk*, 

Finance, 

Labor, 

Education, 

Public Health, 

Judicial Xominations (Clerk), 

Appropriations, 

State Prison, ' Hotel Capitol. 

Cap. Fur. & Gds. (Clk.), Put. MT Camp, 

Cit. & Bor., Put. MT Camp (Chm.), 

Roads, Bridges, and Rivers (Clk.), 

Fisheries, 

Federal Relations (Chairman), 

Roads, Bridges, and Rivers, 

Roads, Bridges, and Rivers, 

Incorporations (Chairman), Allyn House. 

Labor, 1 

Forfeited Rights (Chairman), 

Temperance, 

Manual and Roll, | 

Putnam Memorial Camp, 

State Prison, 

Const. Amendments Joint (Clerk), 

New County and County Seats, 90 Church St. 

Const. Amend. (House) (Clerk), 

Constitutional Amendments, Joint, 98 Capitol Ave. 

Sale of Lands (Clerk), 

Xew Towns and Probate Districts, 

Humane Institutions. 

Education (Chairman), 

Cities and Boroughs (Chairman), Hotel Hartford. 

Cities and Boroughs, 

Xew Counties and Co. Seats (Clk.), 

.Appropriations, Assign, of Seats, 

Joint Rules, 

Constitutional Amendments, Joint, Park View Hotel. 



14 



COMMITTEES OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



Aiiriculture—Room 51), M fl., E. side 
Chairman, Senator Averill. House chairman, 
Mr. Day, Brooklyn; Clerk, Mr. Dayton, Water- 
town; Messrs. DuBon, Windsor; Hough, Wal- 
lingford; Buckingham, Fairfield; Hammond, 
Cromwell; Thompson, Ellington; Morgan, 
Salem. 

Appropriations — Room 2<i, 'M fl., E. side. 
Chairman, Senator Lee. House chairman, Mr. 
Converse, Stafford; Clerk, Mr. Parker, Say- 
brook; Messrs. Reynolds, Bristol; Parmelee, 
New London; Douglas, Sterling; Thomas, 
Thomaston; V'aill, C.oshen; Wood, Derby. 

Assignment of Se.nts (House)— Chair- 
man, Mr. Marsh, Bridgeport; Clerk, Mr. Eaton, 
North Haven; Mr. Wood, Derby. i 

Ba/iJts— Room ."m, 8d fl., W. side. Chair- 
man, Senator, Ferris. House chairman, Mr. 
Keeler, Norvvalk; Clerk, Mr. Stoughton, 
Plymouth; Messrs. Southworth, Southington; 
Hall, Waterbury; Noyes, Stonington; Bixby, 
Thompson; Talcott, Vernon; Holbrook, Wind- 
sor Locks. 

Canvass of Votes for Justices of 
the /*eace-~Chairman, Senator Averill. 
House chairman, Mr. Kenney, Washington; 
Clerk, Mr. Squire, Ro.xbury; Messrs. Bailey, 
Groton; Mead, Ridgefield; Douglas, Sterling; I 
Hodge, Marlborough; Smith, Middlebury; 
Champlin, Coventry. 

Capitol Furniture and Grounds — 
Chairman, Senator Douglas. House chairman, 
Mr. Jones, New Canaan; Clerk, Mr. Vinton, 
Mansfield; Messrs. Loveland, Glastonbury; 
Jeralds, Cheshire; Goodwin, Woodstock; Gar- 
lick, Woodbury; Mead, Greenwich; Potter, 
Griswold. 

Cities and Boroughs— Room 60, 3d fl., 
W. side. Chairman, Senator Marigold. House 
chairman, Mr. Williams, Salisbury; Clerk, Mr. 
Tibbals, Milford; Messrs. Wadsworth, Suffield; 
Harvey, Colchester; Wilson, Windham; Bush- 
nell, (Jld Saybrook; Fahey, Vernon; Blackman, 
Newtown. 

Claims—Room (i, 1st fl., E. Side. Chair- 
man, Senator Mix. House chairman, Mr. 
Brewer, Norwich; Clerk, Mr. Beach, Seymour; 
Messrs. Sanborn, Canton; Bailey, Groton; 
Mead, Ridgefield; Kenney, Washington; 
Stoughton, Bethlehem; Campbell, Newtown. 

Constitutional Amendments (Joint)— 
Room 73, 4th fl., W. side. Chairman, Senator 
Johnson. House chairman, Mr. Judson, Strat- 
ford; Clerk, Mr. Welch, Windsor; Messrs. Dud- 
ley, Guilford; White, Ridgefield; Morgan, 
Plainfield; Lewis, Middletown; Gunn, Milford; 
Yutzler, Cornwall. 

Constitutional Amendments (House) 
— Room 72, 4th fl., W. side. Chairman, Mr. 
Greene, Norwich; Clerk, Mr. Randle, Redding; 
Messrs. Russell, Orange; Wheeler, Hartland; 
Bradford, Canterbury; Clark, Essex; Clark, 
Morris; Hicks, Tolland. 

Contingent Expenses (House l— Chair- 
man, Mr. Lord, Killingworth; Clerk, Mr. Kel- 
ler, Bridgeport; Mr. Gabb, Bloomfield. 

Contested Elections (Senate) Chair- 
man, Senator Warner. Clerk, Senator Chandler; 
Senator Hall. 

Contested Elections (House)— Chair- 
man, Mr. Judson, Stratford; Clerk, Mr. Rora- 
back, Torrington; Mr. Gunn, Milford. 

ijdiioafio/i — Room 42, ;M fl., E. side. 
Chairman, Senator Palmer. House chairman, 
Mr. Williams, Glastonbury; Clerk, Mr. Corttis, 
Thompson; Messrs. Range, (iuilford; Turner, 
Lebanon; Lacey, Fairfield; Miller, Killingly; 
Backus, Andover; Marsh, Litchfield. 

Engrossed Bills -Chairman, Senator 
Chandler; Senator Hall. House chairman, 
Mr. Hull, Monroe; Marsh, Litchfield. Clerk, 
Mr. J. F. Carpenter. 

Executive Nominations — Senators 
Johnson, Mix and Smith. Clerk, Senator 
Smith. 

Federal Relations Chairman. Senator 
Little. House chairman, Mr. Wallace, Union; 
Clerk, Mr. Lathrop, Coventry; Messrs. Burn- 
ham, South Windsor, Ruick; (Jranby; Sheldon, 



Kranford; Hitchcock, Woodbridgc; Barnes, 
New Milford; Main, Preston. 

F/u.T/iee- Room .'iS. M fl., W. side. Chair- 
man, Senator Lounsbury. House chairman, 
Mr. Rowan, Norwalk; Clerk, Mr. Roraback, 
Torrington; Messrs. Francis, Newington; 
Tucker, Ansonia; Marsh, Bridgeport; Mills, 
Middlefield; Keeney, Somers; Roberts, East 
Hartford. 

Fisheries— Room 2.5. 2d fl., E. side. Chair- 
man, Senator Chapman. House chairman, Mr. 
Smith, Groton; Clerk, Mr. Taber, Plainfield; 
Messrs. Georgia, Farmington; Munger, Madi- 
son; Hungerford, Sherman; Wall, Torrington; 
Parmelee, Killingworth; Smith, Pomfret. 

Forfeited Rights Room 75, 4th fl., W. 
side. Chairman, Senator Crosby. House 
chairman, Mr. Washburn, Stafford; Clerk, Mr. 
Lord, Killingworth; Messrs. Talmage, Pros- 
pect; Tennant, Hebron; Everett, Barkham- 
5ted; Lucas, Goshen; McCarthy, Naugatuck, 
Bugbee, Old Lyme. 

Humane Institutions— Room 47, 3d fl., 
E. side. Chairman, Senator Bernd. House chair- 
man, Mr. Newton, New Haven; Clerk, Mr. 
Saunders, Waterford; Messrs. Whiton, Man- 
chester; Fuller, Suffield: Lounsbury; Darien, 
Barber, Putnam; Battey, Columbia; Booth, 
New Milford. 

Incorporations— Room 27, 2d fl.. E. side 
Chairman, Senator Webster. House chairman, 
Mr. Warner, Putnam; Clerk, Mr. Boss, New- 
London; Messrs. Goodrich, Wethersfield; Dow- 
ner, Hamden; Goulden, Stamford; Spaulding, 
Winchester; Alvord, Bolton; Dempsey, Dan- 
bury. 

jMSiirance— Room IH, 1st fl., W. side, j 
Chairman, Senator Fuller. House chairman. 
Mr. Clark, Haddam; Clerk, Mr. Page, Meriden; 
Messrs. Brockett, Simsbury; Lathrop, Frank- 
lin; Mansfield, Redding; Bird, Pomfret; Ford, 
Canaan; Hull, Clinton. 

Judiciary- Supreme Court Room. Chair- 
man, Senator Warner. House chairman, Mr. 
Elmer,* Middletown; Clerk, Mr. Roraback, 
North Canaan; Messrs. Cowell, Waterbury; 
Greene, Norwich; Judson, Stratford; Bowen, 
Windham; Gunn, Milford; Hicks, Tolland. 

Judicial Nominations — Lieut-Gov- 
ernor's Room. Chairman, Senator Chandler. 
House chairman, Mr. Cowell, Waterbury; Clerk 
.Mr. Upson, Berlin; Messrs. Fairchild, Trum- 
bull; Lord, Killingworth; Remington, Cole- 
brook; Lewis, Westbrook; Allen, East Windsor, 
Hill, East Lyme. 

IiOhor — Room 4(i, 3d fl., E. side. Chairman, 
Senator Dayton. House chairman, Mr. Middle- 
ton, Enfield; Clerk, Mr. Orton, Danbury; 
Messrs. Morrill, Meriden; La Place, I^yme; 
Roberts, Kent; Warner, Hebron; TurnbuU, 
New Britain; Markham, Durham. 



Manual and Roll— Chairman, Senator j 
Fuller. House chairman, Mr. Corttis, Thomp- j 
son; Clerk, Mr. Osborn, Hartland; Mr. Way, 
Bozrah. ! 

M'aJiijfactiirers— Room 7(i, 4th fl., W. side. 
Chairman, Senator Birge. House chairman, 
Mr. Hall, Bristol; Clerk, Mr. Hale, Portland; 
Messrs. Clark, Southington; Elliott, New ' 
Haven; Brown, Colchester; Clark, Cornwall; 
Buckley, Sharon; Gladding, Chester. 

Military Affairs-Room 15, 1st fl. W. 
side. Chairman, Senator Crosby. House chair- 
man, Mr. Allen, Sprague; Clerk, Mr. Cheney, 
Manchester; Messrs. Chaffee, Derby; Rouse, 
Voluntown; Close, Greenwich; Jacobs, Kil- 
lingly; Kingman, Washington; Miller, East 
Windsor. 

New Counties and County Seats- 
Room 71). 4th fl., W. side. Chairman, Senator 
Lee. House chairman, Mr. Sumner, Tolland; 
Clerk, Mr. Wood, Montville; Messrs. Reed, 
Cjranby; Mitchell, Southbury; Wheeler, Wes- 
ton; I^mcoln, Hampton; Gillett, New Hartford; 
Bacon, Scotland. 

New Towns and Probate Districts 

— Room 7(1, 4th fl., W. side. Chairman, Senator 
Little. House chairman, Mr. Jacobs, Killingly; 
Clerk, Mr. Ogden, Wilton; Messrs. Ruick, 



Ciranby; Sanford. Oxford; Coats, North Ston- 
ington; Whitney, Barkhamsted; Atwell, Dur- 
ham; Aldrich, Union. 

ruhlic Health Room 72, 4th fl, W. side. 
Chairman, Senator Hall. House chairman, Mr. 
Shelton, Huntington; Clerk, Mr. Finch, Enfield; 
Messrs. Mayberry, East Hartford; Bailey, 
Bethel; Smith, Canterbury; Johnson, Norfolk; 
Twitchell, Naugatuck; P^ly, Lyme. 

Putnam Memorial Camp— Room 75, 
4th fl., W. side. Chairman, Senator Brend. 
House chairman, Mr. Wadsworth. Suffield; 
Clerk, Mr. Mansfield, Redding; Messrs. Lewis, 
Middletown; Boss, New London; Roraback, 
I Torrington; Barnes, New Milford; Vinton, 
I Mansfield; Webster, Ansonia. 

Rai/roarfs— Room 41, 3d fl., E. side Chair- 
man, Senator Coffey. House chairman, Mr. 
Smith, Winchester; Clerk, Mr. Hall, Willington; 
■ Messrs. Eaton, North Haven; Pendleton, Ston- 
ington; Hull, Monroe; Jackson, VVoodstock; 
Bingham, East Haddam; (labb, Bloomfield. 

Roads, Bridges and Rivers— Room 78, 
4th fl., VV. side. Chairman, Senator Hunt. 
House chairman, Mr. Sternberg, West Hart- 
ford; Clerk, Mr. Wakeman, Westport; Messrs. 
Walter, Cheshire; Roberts, Lisbon; Balch, 
Ashford; Page, Harwinton; Jones, Saybrook; 
Wanzer, New Fairfield. 

Rules (Senate)— Senator Marigold. 

Rules (House) — Chairman, Mr. Newton, 
New Haven; Clerk, Mr. Bowen, Windham; Mr. 
Dempsey, Danbury. 

Rules (Joint)— Room (iO, 3d fl., W. side. 
Chairman, Senator Marigold. House chairman, 
Mr. Bowen, Windham; Clerk, Mr. Fairchild, 
Trumbull; Messrs. Holmes, Rocky Hill; Parme- 
lee, New London; Fairchild, Trumbull; Ken- 
ney, Litchfield; Somers, Woodbury; Lewis, 
Westbrook; Wooster, Bridgewater. 

Sale of Lands— Room .54, 3d fl., W. side. 
Chairman, Senator Johnson. House chairman, 
Mr. Roraback, North Canaan; Clerk, Mr. 
Whitehead, Simsbury; Messrs. Froidevaux, 
Avon; Peck, Bethany; Seymour, New Hart- 
ford; Patten, Somers; Chapman, Preston; Gal- 
lup, Ashford. 

School Fund— Room 7, 1st fl., E. side. 
Chairman, Senator Dayton. House chairman, 
Mr. Newton, Wallingford; Clerk, Mr. Eldredge, 
Willington; Messrs. McCall, Lebanon; Gould, 
Easton; Marcy, Eastford; Mundry, Salisbury; 
Gillette, Haddam; Barrett, Hartford. 

State Library-Chairman, Senator Hall. 
House chairman, Mr. Hicks, Tolland; Clerk, 
Mr. Hemingway, Plainville; Mr. Mead, Green- 
wich. 

State Prison— Room 45, 3d fl., E. side. 
Chairman, Senator Smith. House chairman, 
Mr. Kinlock, New Britain; Clerk, Mr. Robbins, 
Wethersfield; Messrs. Linsley, North Branford; 
Hunt, Chaplin; Van Alstyne, Sharon; Swan, 
East Haddam; Weeks, Mansfield; Lee, Brook- 
field. 



Temperance— Room HO, 4th fl., W. side. 
Chairman, Senator (jates. House chairman, 
Mr. Starr, Chatham; Clerk, Mr. Keller, Bridge- 
port; Messrs. Watrous, Hartford; Bidwell, East 
Granby; Grannis, East Haven; Main, North 
Stonington; Hopkins, Warren; Deming, Cole- 
brook. 

Unfinished BH.sine.ss— Chairman, Sena- 
tor Dayton, House chairman, Mr. Thomas, 
Thomaston; Clerk, Mr. Potter, Griswold; Mr. 
Carrier, Chatham. 

Woman Suffrage— Chairman, Senator 
Palmer. House chairman, Mr. Gunn, Milford; 
Clerk, Mr. Terrill, Beacon Falls; Messrs. Alder- 
man, Burlington; Bailey, Wolcott; Catlin, 
Herwinton; Stannard, Norfolk; Lewis, Farm- 
ington; Gray, LeHyard. 



Veteran Association— Room 70, 4th fl., 
E. side. President, Mr. Watrous, Hartford; 
Clerk, Mr. Reynolds, Bristol. 

Agricultural Association— Room .50, 
.3d fl., K. side. President, Mr. Dayton, Water- 
town; Clerk, Mr. Eaton, North Haven. 



*Resigned— Appointed Judge of Superior Court. E. S. Goodrich, of Wethersfield, succeeds him. 

15 




Hon. O. VINCENT COFFIN 

GOVERNOR 



Hon. O. Vincent Coffin, of Middle- 
town, Governor of the State of Connecticut, 
was born at Mansfield, Duchess County, 
New York, June 30, 1836, and is a lineal de- 
scendant in the seventh generation of 
Tristam Coffin, who came from England 
about 1642, and was afterward Governor 
of Nantucket and Tuckernucket. He was 
educated in Cortland Academy and the 
Charlotteville Seminarv, New York. The 



son of a farmer, he passed his boyhood 
in farm work. He taught school when 
16 and was salesman for a wholesale 
mercantile concern in New York when 17. 
From 19 to 25 he was the New York 
representative of a prominent firm ot 
Connecticut manufacturers and subse- 
quently became a special partner in suc- 
cessful business enterprises in New York. 
In 1859 he married the daughter of the 



late Linus Cole, of Middletown, and went 
to that city to reside in 1864. Althougli 
excluded by the authorities from military 
service in the war of 1861-5, he chose to 
render what service he could in furnishing 
a substitute and in other ways. He was a 
member of the New York Committee of the 
United States Christian Commission and 
president of the Brooklyn, N. Y., Young 
Men's Christian Association during a con- 
siderable portion of the years in which 
those organizations were most prominent in 
field hospital work forthearmy of theUnion. 
After settling in Middletown Mr. Coffin 
became the active executive officer of the 
Farmers' and Mechanics' Savings Bank 
and held that position fourteen years, until 
1878, when ill-health obliged him to retire 
from active work. Six years later, his 
health being restored, he became president 



of the Middlesex Fire Assurance Company, 
a position he now holds. He was president 
of the Middlesex County Agricultural 
Society in 1875, has been Mayor of Middle- 
town for two years, director and vice- 
president of the First National Bank, 
director, secretary and treasurer of the 
railroad company, was president four years 
of the Middletown Young Men's Christian 
Association, and has held over a score of 
other positions of a more or less public 
character. 

Mr. Coffin has never been a seeker for 
positions. He became a candidate for Sena- 
tor in the district which had given a Re- 
publican majority for Senator only twice in 
about thirty years and was twice elected. 
His phenomenal plurality of over 1 7,000 for 
Governor marks the high-water achieve- 
ment of the Republicans of the State. 




17 




Hon. LORRIN A. COOKE 



LIEUTEXAXT-GOVERXOR 



Hon. Lorrix A. Cooke, of Barkhamsted, 
Lieutenant-Governor of Connecticut, was 
born in New Marlboro, Mass., April 6, 1831, 
a descendant of one of the first settlers- 
His great-grandfather was a soldier in the 
Revolutionar}' war. He moved when a boy 
with his father to Norfolk, Conn., where he 
received an academical education. He 
taught school and then settled down on a 
farm. In 1856 he was chosen a Represen- 
tative from Colebrook, then being: identified 
with the Republican part}-. He filled many 
town offices. In 1869 he became manager 
of the Eagle Scythe Compan}-, of Riverton. 
In 1 88 1 he was chosen Senator from the 
Eighteenth District. For some time he was 
Postmaster. In 1882 he was reelected to the 
Senate, and was for three years Chairman of 
the Committee on Education. He was alsc^ 
frequently presiding officer as president 
pro tern, of the Senate, in which capacity he 
discharged his duties accuratelv and with 



impartiality. During the session of 1884 he 
was also Chairman of the Committee on En- 
grossed Bills, a position attracting no atten- 
tion, but involvino; a good deal of time and 
hard work and qualifications of a high order. 
He was appointed, on the part of the Sen- 
ate, a special committee to investigate cer- 
tain matters in connection with the Storrs 
Agricultural School, at Mansfield. He now 
is one of the trustees of the Girls' Indus- 
trial School at Middletown. In 1886 he 
was moderator of the Congregational Na- 
tional Council at Chicago. 

In the fall of 1886 he was chosen. Lieuten- 
ant-Governor on the ticket with Hon. 
Henr}' B. Harrison, of New Haven. In 
1892 he was a delegate from the Fourth 
District to the National Republican con- 
vention, held at Minneapolis. His nomi- 
nation, bv acclamation, and election, in 
1894, were graceful tributes to his efficiency 
and popularity. 




Hon. WILLIAM C. MOWRY 

SECRETARY OF STATE 



Hon. William C. Mowry, Secretary of 
State of Connecticut, belongs to Norwich, 
where he was born June 26, 1850. His ele- 
mentary education was received at the pubHc 
schools of his native city. Graduating at the 
Norwich Free Academy, he prepared for a 
course of instruction in the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School, but was prevented from enter- 
ing that institution by a trouble of his eyes, 
which threatened permanent loss of sight. 
Afterward, recovering the use of them, he 
entered the works of the Mowry Axle and 
Machine Company for the purpose of obtain- 
ing a yjractical knowledge of the business. 

Remaining in the mechanical department 
two years, he was promoted to the business 
department of the same compan}-, which 
place he retained until 1876. About this 



time a new enterprise was organized in 
Norwich for the manufacture of the Page 
steam heater, for furnishing artificial heat 
to residences and public buildings. Col. 
Mowr}' became interested in this, and, hav- 
ing dissolved his former business connec- 
tions, entered actively into the new enter- 
prise, becoming treasurer and manager of 
the Page Steam Heating Company. 

Colonel Mowry was an aide on Governor 
Harrison's staff in 1886 and was a promi- 
nent member of the House in 1889, where 
he served as Chairman of Committee on 
Corporations. In 1893 he was again in the 
House, where, among other important 
duties, he was assigned on the Committee 
on State Prison Investigation. He lent 
much strength to the State ticket in 1894. 



10 




GEORGE W. HODGE 



TREASURER 



George W. Hodge, ot Windsor, State 
Treasurer of Connecticut, has been identi- 
fied with the business interests of his town 
and section for years. He was born in Se}-- 
mour, July 5, 1845. He studied in the Con- 
necticut Literar}- Institution at Suffield, 
and then learned to manufacture paper in 
his father's mills at Rainbow, Windsor, 
whither the family had removed in 1853. In 
1866 he went into partnership with his 
father, and remained in the concern until 
he sold out in 1874: 1876 he bought an in- 



terest in the press paper manufactory ot 
House & Co., and bv successive purchases, 
he has since become the owner of the whole 
business, though the old name stands. Mr. 
Hodge has been active in local politics for 
years and he has held all the offices in the 
gift of his town, was Postmaster at Rain- 
bow five years and was on the Republi- 
can Town Committee eight years. He 
was a member of the House in the year 
1 88 1, and a Senator from the Third Dis- 
trict in 1889. 



ao 




Hon. benjamin P. MEAD 



COMPTROLLER 



Hon. Benjamin P. Mead, of New Ca- 
naan, Comptroller of Connecticut, was born 
in Bridgeport, September 20, 1847, and after 
an education in the academy went into 
business. He was drawn aside into poli- 
tics and, while still retaining his interests 
as a merchant, moving to New Canaan was 
elected Town Clerk, and for seven consecu- 
tive years was chosen a Selectman. For 
more than fifteen times he has been chosen 
to offices of distinction. 



In 1885 and 1887 Mr. Mead was in the 
House. In 1887 he was House Chairman 
of the Committee on Fisheries. Mr. Mead 
was Senator from the Twelfth District in 
1889, and again in 1891, the year of the 
deadlock. The former year he was Chair- 
man of the Committee on Cities and 
Boroughs. In 1891 he stood by his party 
from first to last. To his new duties he 
brings a wide experience and much execu- 
tive ability. 



31 




CHARLES PARxMELE GRAHAM 



ADJUTAXT-GEXERAL 



Charles Parmele Graham, Adjutant- 
General, was born in Utica, N. Y., June 6, 
1839. He came to Middletown and en- 
gaged in the practice of dentistry, which 
he has followed for thirty-six years. De- 
cember 8, 1 87 1, he joined Company H, 
Second Regiment ; after a m :)nth of service 
was made First Sergeant, eight months 
later he became First Lieutenant, and on 
April 21, 1873, Captain. September 3, 1875, 
he became Major of the regiment. July 15, 
1878, he succeeded Col. Stephen R. Smith, 
when that officer became Brigadier-General. 
Gen. Smith was made Adjutant-General 



under Gov. Harrison and Colonel Graham 
was promoted to be Brigadier-General, 
January 28, 1885. March i, 1890, he was 
relieved b}' Gov. Bulkeley as an out- 
growth of the First Regiment polo quarrel 
and honorably discharged. Committees 
of two Legislatures found the charges not 
sustained and recommended his restora- 
tion. The Senate of 1893 refused by only 
one vote to restore him. Gen. Graham 
has alwaj's been a military officer ot 
ability. The general is a Dental Com- 
missioner of the State and President of the 
State Dental Society. 



33 




WILLIAM E. DISBROW 



QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL 



William E. Disbrow of Bridgeport, 
Quartermaster-General, is a war veteran. 
He is connected with the Grand Army 
Post at Bridgeport and has held Federal 
offices. Always actively interested in 
politics he managed the last Republican 
campaign in his cit3\ He was bcjrn in 



Brookfield, Conn., fifty years ago, and has 
been a farmer, a spring maker and an in- 
surance agent. During the war he served 
as Corporal of Company H, Second Connec- 
ticut Heavy Artillery. He was a supervisor 
of the Connecticut census of 1880, and has 
been a Deputy United States Marshal. 







GEO. AUSTIN BOWEN, M. D. 

SURGEON-GENERAL 



Geo. Austin Bowen, M. D., Surgeon-Gen- 
eral, is of an old Connecticut family which 
located in Woodstock with the " pioneer set- 
tlers " in 1686, and has always been a promi- 
nent one in business and town affairs. General 
Bowen was born in Woodstock, July 7, 1841, 
in one of the family homesteads, which he now 
occupies. This old residence, a portion of it 
dating back to Colonial days, is quaint in 
structure, vine-clad and picturesque, and has 
been in the family for four generations. 

In 185 I he removed with his family to Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., where he received a liberal educa- 
tion, and was graduated from the University 
of New York, with the degree of M. D., in 
1863. 

It was his desire to enter the army as a surgeon 
and steps were taken to secure a position, but 
entreaties of friends, and the offer of an asso- 
ciate position with his preceptor, Dr. John 
Goul Rosman, a leading practitioner of the 
city, prevailed and he reluctantly relinquished 
the idea. He, however, saw much of military 
surgery in the army hospitals that surrounded 
New York and Brooklyn, where he frequently 
acted as a volunteer surgeon. He early con- 
nected himself with dispensary and hospital 
practice, serving five years as attending physi- 
cian, for two years of which he was at the head 
of the department of skin diseases, and was for 
three years the secretary of the county medical 
society. Overwork resulted in a complete loss 
of health, compelling a relinquishment of all 
labor. To secure rest he retired to his farm at 
Woodstock in 1873 for a six months' vacation. 
It was three years, however, before health was 
restored; in the meantime his love for agricul- 
ture had gained the ascendancy, and he re- 
solved to make Woodstock his home, where he 



has since pursued his profession and conducted 
a dairy and stock farm, breeding thoroughbred 
horses, cattle and sheep. In agriculture he 
has had many positions: Was secretary of the 
famous Woodstock Farmers' Club during its 
history of twelve years; was twice elected 
president of the Woodstock Agricultural 
Society; has been a director of the Woodstock 
Creamery Incorporation from its inception, 
and for five years was president of the Con- 
necticut Dairymen's Association; was the first 
Master of Senexet Grange ; for two years 
was the deputy for Windham County ; served 
one term of two years as lecturer of the State 
Grange, and is now serving for the third term 
as Master thereof, and is a member of the 
National Grange. During these years he has 
lectured extensively in the New England, Mid- 
dle and some of the Western States on agricul- 
tural and scientific subjects, and has been the 
president of the Patrons' Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company of Hartford since its organiza- 
tion in 1887. 

In limiting his practice, he stdl keeps in close 
contact with his profession. Is the medical 
examiner, also the health officer, for the town 
of Woodstock, and is connected with the Day 
Kimball Hospital of Putnam, and is a member 
of the Association of American Military Sur- 
geons. 

General Bowen has always been active in 
politics and connected with local and State 
associations, but would never consent to be- 
come a candidate for any office He was, how- 
ever, nominated for Lieutenant-Governor on 
the ticket with General Merwin in 1890, which 
occurred while he was absent from the State on 
professional business, and a declination im- 
possible. 



2i 




HENRY SEYMOUR PECK 



COMMISSARY-GENERAL 



Henry Seymour Peck, of New Haven, 
Commissary-General, went to the Civil 
War as principal musician in the non- 
commissioned staff of the Twenty -second 
Connecticut. Serving until December 23, 
1863, he returned to New Haven (where 
he was born) in 1845, and where he gradu- 
ated from Russell's Collegiate and Com- 
mercial Institute in 1862, and continued 
until 1870 in the photographic business. 



Then he went into the warehouse business 
in New York, and remained until 1888. 
General Peck was a Lieutenant of the 
Second Company Governor's Foot Guards 
and has been Vice-Commander of Admiral 
Foote Post, G. A. R. He is now an aid 
on National Commander Lawler's staff, 
G. A. R. 

General Peck was at one time a Council- 
man and a Commissioner of Public Parks. 



25 




JAMES H. JARMAN 



PAYMASTER-GENERAL 



James H. jARMAN,of Hartford, Paymas- 
ter-General, was born in New Haven, June 
ID, 1848. There, at the age of 19, he be- 
came a member of the New Haven Grays. 
After three and one-half years of service 
he removed to Hartford and became one 
of the org-anizers of Company K. First Regi- 
ment, enlisting February ID, 1879. In April 
he was made a Sergeant, February 19, 
1883, became Second Lieutenant, and First 
Lieutenant April 29, 1886. Major and 
Brigade Inspector of Rifle Practice were 
his next honors, under Brigadier-General 
Graham. He declined to consider an ap- 
pointment on the staff of Colonel Watson, 
named to succeed General Graham. Gen- 
eral Jarman is an agent at the home otifice 



of the Connecticut Mutual Life, and an 
ardent worker in the Y. M. C. A. He is 
Chairman of the Board of School Visitors 
of Hartford, and has been an earnest advo- 
cate of the introduction of sewing and 
manual training in our public schools. 
The General is a thirty-second degree 
Mason ; Past Commander of Washington 
Commandery, No. i,K. T. ; an officer in 
the Scottish Rite bodies, and a member of 
the Mystic Shrine ; a charter member of 
the Hartford Republican Club, a member 
of The McKinley and The 20th Century 
Clubs. He is also Councilman from the 
Second Ward. General Jarman prepared 
for college, intending to enter Yale in the 
class of 1869, but circumstances prevented. 




LEONARD M. DAGGETT 

JUDGE ADVOCATE-GENERAL 



Leonard M. Daggett, of New Haven, 
Judge Advocate-General, graduated at 
Yale Academic in 1884, and the Law 
School in 1887. He is a nephew of the 
late Rev. O. E. Daggett, Pastor at Yale 
College and a son of Dr. Daggett, a well- 
known practitioner. He is a member of 



the law firm of White & Daggett, and 
Instructor on Law of Wills in the 
Graduate Course at the Yale Law School. 
General Daggett was born in New 
Haven, November 23, 1863. In 1891 
he was a member of the Board of 
Councilmen. 



27 




Col. HERBERT LATIMER CAMP 

AID-I)E-CAMP 



Colonel Herbert Latimer Camp, of 
Middletown, is a son of the late J. N. 
Camp and a nephew of the late General 
Frederick E. Camp, Adjutant-General on 
the staff of Governor Lounsbury, and Pay- 
master-General on the staff of Governor 
Bigelow. He was teller of the First 



National Bank of Middletown until about a 
3'ear ago, but is now devoting his whole 
time to the management of several large 
estates. Colonel Camp was born in Middle- 
town, July 30, 1867, and was educated 
wholly in the public and private schools of 
that city. 




Col. WATSON J. iMILLER 



AID-DE-CAMP 



Col. Watson J. Miller, ot Shclton, 
town of Huntington, was born in Middle- 
town, Conn., Nov. 23, 1849, and is a de- 
scendant of Thomas Miller, who came from 
England about 1630, and who built the 
first mill in Middletown about 1660. Gov. 
Benjamin Miller was the youngest son of 
Thomas Miller and great-great-grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch. This en- 
titles Colonel Miller to membership in 
the Sons of the Colonial Wars. On his 
mother's side the Colonel is a descendant 
of Timothy Prout, also a native of England, 
who came to Boston about 1640, removing 
to Middletown about 1670, and was in- 
terested in the building of the first vessel 
on the Connecticut River at Middletown. 

Colonel Miller's education was obtained 
in the Middletown High School and Chase 
Institute, also at the New Haven Business 
College. 

In 1868, he engaged in the manufacture 
of silverware at Middletown, and in 1874 
married Miss Susie J. Waite, daughter of 
Alonzo Waite, ot Chicopee, Mass., then 



went to New York, still in the same busi- 
ness, returning to Connecticut in 1879 ^^id 
locatinof in Shelton, town of Hunting-ton, 
where he was made Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager of the reorganized 
Derby Silver Company. Ten years after- 
ward he became its president, with control 
and general management. He has had 
tendered him several times the nomination 
of representative from his town, but has 
declined all political honors, preferring to 
devote his whole time and energy to the 
building up of his business interests. 
Colonel Miller is also President of the 
South End Land Company, of the Shelton 
Savings Bank, the Shelton Building and 
Loan Association, and a director in the 
Derby Building and Lumber Company, 
Home Trust Company, Shelton and Derby 
Board of Trade, Public Library and has 
just been elected a director in the Birming- 
ham National Bank, to succeed the late 
Edward N. Shelton. Colonel Miller is 
also a 32d degree Mason, Knight Templar 
and member of Mystic Shrine. 



■Z'J 




Col. henry WALTON WESSELLS 

AID-DE-CAMP 



Col. Hexrv Walton Wessells, ot 
Litchtield, was born in New Milford, July 
13, 1845, ^"d educated at the "Gunnery," 
in Washington, and is of the firm of Wes- 
sells, Gates & Co., druggists. He is the 
son of Gen. L. W. Wessells, who was Col- 
onel of the Nineteenth Connecticut Volun- 
teers and Quartermaster-General under 
Gov. Andrews. Col. Wessells is a member 
of New York Commanderv, Loyal Legion. 
and of the Young Men's Republican Club of 
New Haven. He is also Warden of the 
Borough ot Litchfield, Secretary of the 
Litchfield Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, Treasurer Connecticut Societ}- Sons 



of the Revolution, Vice-President Connec- 
ticut Society War of 181 2, Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Litchfield Club, member 
of the Division Council, Sons ot Veterans, 
and Capt. of C. (). Belden Camp No. 81, 
Sons of Veterans. For three years h.e was 
Lieutenant of Company H, Fourth Regi- 
ment, C. N. G. He has been an Assessor 
of Litchfield, Colonel and Lieutenant-Col- 
onel Connecticut Division Sons of Veter- 
ans, member of the Advisory Board Sons 
of Veterans' Guards, and of the Council in 
Chief; President New England Association 
Sons of Veterans, and Registrar of Connec- 
ticut Society of Colonial War. 



30 





Col. WM. E. F. LANDERS 



ASSISTANT AnjUTANT-GENERAL 



Colonel Landers was until Jan. 9, 1895, 
from Sept. 23, 1893, Assistant General, 
with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, on 
the staff of Gen. George Havens, the 
brigade commander of the National Guard. 
He is 47 years old, was born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., and has seen over thirteen years' 
service in the National Guard. In 1866, 
when Colonel Landers lived in Mystic, 
Conn., he enlisted in Company " A," Third 
Regiment, C. N. G. He was promoted to 
Corporal, Sergeant, First Sergeant, and 
elected Second Lieutenant May 8, 1868; 
Captain, June 4, 1871, and Major of the 
Regiment, December 4, 1874. He resigned, 
February 26, 1878, and again entered the 
service September 23, 1893, succeeding 
Lieut. -Col. George M. Cole on General 
Havens' staff. 

Colonel Landers has had a large experi- 
ence and been an active worker in fra- 
ternal orders, having been Worshipful 



Master ot Charity Lodge, No. 68, F. & A. 
M. ; High Priest of Benevolence Chapter, 
No. 21,1^. A. M.; Thrice Illustrious Master 
of Mystic Council, No. 29, R. & S. M.; 
also District Deputy Grand Master for the 
Masonic Lodges in New London County. 
He has been Grand Master Workman of 
the Grand Lodge A. O. U. W., Massa- 
chusetts jurisdiction, embracing the New 
England States, and as a representative 
from that grand body has attended sessions 
of the Supreme Lodge of United States 
and Canada at Omaha, Detroit and Helena, 
Montana. He has also " preached" the 
merits of the Order before audiences in the 
principal cities in Maine, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island and Connecticut, and is still 
" in the harness." 

Colonel Landers is a merchant in New 
London (firm of W. E. F. Landers & Co.), 
being in business there in the carpet, dry 
goods and house furnishing line. 




Col. LOUIS RICHMOND CHENEY 



ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL 



Col. Louis Richmond Cheney, Assist- 
ant Quartermaster-General, was born in 
South Manchester, Conn., April 27, 1859. 

He was educated at the Hartford High 
School, and was engaged in the silk busi- 
ness for fourteen years at South Man- 
chester, Hartford and New York, until 
July, 1893, when he returned to Hartford, 
and has since been in charge of several 
estates. He is secretary of the Republican 



Club ot Hartford, a director in the Con- 
necticut River Banking Co., beside having 
been treasurer of the Land and Improve- 
ment Co., of Rye, N. Y. 

Colonel Cheney is known as a man of 
fine social instincts and good business qual- 
ifications, making him deservedly popular 
in both public and private life. Among his 
brother officers he is considered a very 
companionable addition to the staff. 



32 




Capt. JOHN MILTOX THOMPSON 

AID-DE-CAMP 



Capt. John Milton Thompson, 24th 
U. S. Infantry, now attached to the Staff 
of the Commander-in-Chief of the Military 
Forces of the State, was born in Lebanon, 
N. H., Aug. I, 1842. 

He entered the volunteer service as a 
private in the 7th N. H., Nov. 7, 1861, and 
served continuousl}' until mustered out as 
Captain 33d U. S. C. T., Jan. 31, 1866. 

He was present during the siege of 
Charleston and its minor operations, serv- 
ing as Provost Marshal, Provost Judge, 
etc., of the city after its capture. 



He was bre vetted for gallant and meri- 
torious conduct at James Island, 1864. 

In 1866 he was appointed Second Lieu- 
tenant in the regular army, since which 
time his service has been mostly in Texas, 
Indian Territory, New Mexico and Ari- 
zona. Captain Thompson's thirty-three 
years of active service cannot be given in 
an article like this. 

He is a member of the Militarv Order 
Lo3al Legion, Sons of American Revolu- 
tion and New Hampshire Sons of Rev- 
olution. 




Hox. ORVILLE H. FLATT. 



UNITED STATES SENATOR. 



Hon. Orville H. Platt, one of the 
United States Senators from Connecticut, 
was born in the town of Washington, 
Litchfield County, in this State, on July 19, 
1827. He is a son of Daniel G. Flatt, a 
farmer. His education was received in the 
common schools and in " The Gunnery," 
in the town of Washington. Mr. Platt 
studied law in the office of Hon. Gideon H. 
HoUister, Litchfield, the well-known his- 
torian of Connecticut, and was admitted 
to the bar in Litchfield in 1849. Subse- 
quently he secured admission to the Penn- 
sylvania bar in Towanda, Bradford County, 
and spent six months in the office of Hon. 
Ulysses Mercur, now Chief-Justice of the 
Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. He re- 
turned to Connecticut in 1851, and located 
in Meridcnas a practitioner of law, and has 



since made that city his home. In 1855-6 
he was Clerk ot the Connecticut Senate, 
and was elected Secretary of State in 1857. 
In 1 861-2 he was a member of the Senate, 
and in 1864 and 1869 was elected to the 
House, — the last year serving as its 
Speaker. In all these positions he dis- 
played exceptional qualifications and 
showed a special aptitude for legislative 
business. In 1877 he was chosen State At- 
torney for New Haven County, and held 
that place till elected, in 1879, to the 
United States Senate to succeed Hon. 
William H. Barnum. His first term in 
the Senate expired March 3, 1885, but 
he was imanimously re-elected, and at 
the expiration of his second term, in 
1891, was again chosen for the term expir- 
ing in 1897. 



34 




Hon. JOSEPH R. HAWLEY. 



UXITKl) S'lATES SKXAl'OR. 



Hon. Joseph R. Hawley, United 
States Senator from Connecticut, Avas born 
October 31, 1826, at vStewartsville, N. C. 
His father, Rev. Francis Hawley, was born 
in Farmington, Conn., a descendant 01 
Samuel Hawley who settled in Stratford, 
Conn., in 1639. In 1837 the family removed 
to Connecticut, and in 1841 to Cazenovia, 
N. Y. General Hawley prepared for col- 
lege at the Hartford Grammar School and 
the Cazenovia Seminary and graduated at 
Hamilton College, N. Y., in 1847. In 1^49 
he returned to Connecticut and began the 
practice of law in Hartford as the partner 
of John Hooker, September i, 1850. From 
the profession of a lawyer he turned to 
that of editor, and thus graduated into 
politics. He was elected Governor of 
Connecticut in 1866, filling the office for a 
single term. In the autumn of 1872, upon 
the death of Julius L. Strong, he was 
elected a Representative in Congress over 
William W. Eaton, and was re-elected for 
the full term in April, 1873. He was de- 
feated in 1875 and 1876. but elected to the 
Forty-sixth Congress in 1878, taking his 
seat March 4, 1879. Thence, March 4, 



1 88 1, he was transferred to the Senate, and 
was re-elected for a second term in 1 887, 
and again in 1893 for his third term. 

Senator Hawley is one of the best ex- 
temj)ore speakers in the United States, 
and his services are in demand in all politi- 
cal campaigns. He speaks with much 
vigor and magnetism, and his words always 
have an important influence for good. He 
always voices the best sentiment of the 
country in ever}' department of activity, 
and the citizens of the vState take great 
pride in being represented by him at the 
National capital. 

Senator Hawley 's war record is one ot 
which any patriot may be proud. From 
the profession of law3-er he turned to that 
of editor, and in 1861 was among the first 
to enlist under President Lincoln's first call 
for troops. He enlisted in Rifle Company 
A, First Connecticut Volunteers, and was 
chosen Captain. On the return of this 
Regiment from service he was appointed 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the Seventh Con- 
necticut and served until the close of the 
war, when he was discharged with the 
brevet rank of Major-General. 



35 




^^ '**^ 




Hon. E. STEVENS HENRY 



CONGRESSMAN, FIRST DISTRICT 



Hon. E. Stevens Henry (Vernon), 
Member of Congress from the First Dis- 
trict, was born in Gill, Mass., in 1836, and 
removed to Rockville early in life. He 
grew up in and with that prosperous com- 
munity, and is one of its leading citizens. 
He is a successful business man, a large 
owner of real estate, proprietor of a fine 
farm, breeder of choice cattle, and a man- 
ager of various other important interests, 
being at the head of the People's Savings 
Bank. He is a director in the First Na- 
tional Bank of Rockville, and in the First 
National Bank of Willimantic,also treasurer 
of the Tolland County Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company. Mr. Henry was a member 
of the House of Representatives in the 
General Assembly of 1883, State Senate in 



1887 and 1888; was a delegate-at-large in 
the Republican National Convention in 
1888, was State Treasurer for four years, 
from 1889 to 1893. His record in this 
office is well known, and his methods have 
received the heartiest indorsement of the 
taxpayers of the State. U.nder his admin- 
istration the State tax was eliminated, the 
State debt largely reduced by the payment 
of all matured and optional bonded obliga- 
tions. 

Mr. Henry is at present Mayor of Rock- 
ville, being elected for two years in Decem- 
ber, 1893. He was the Republican candi- 
date for Congress in 1892, but was defeated 
by Lewis Sperry by a plurality of 562. In 
1894 Henry defeated Sperry by 5,207. run- 
ning 703 votes ahead of the State ticket. 




Hon. NEHEMIAH DAY SPERRY 



CONGRESSMAN-ELECT 



Hon. Nehemiah Day Sperry, of New 
Haven, was born at Woodbridge, New 
Haven County, Conn., on July lo, 1827. 

He is of Puritan ancestry, being in direct 
line of descent from Richard Sperry, one of 
the early settlers of New England. 

The subject of this sketch is the third 
son of Enoch and Atlanta Sperry. His 
father was a farmer and manufacturer of 
some means and of excellent repute, who 
transmitted to his offspring the best quali- 
ties of the sturdy Puritan stock from which 
he sprang. Young Sperry was educated 
in the public schools of his native place, 
and spent one year at Prof. Amos Smith's 
private school at New Haven. By his 
labors as a teacher, and also through his 
connection with his father's business, he 
was enabled to save several hundred 
dollars, and with this small capital at his 



command, he entered upon a very suc- 
cessful business career in New Haven as 
the junior member of the building firm of 
Smith & Sperry, founded in 1848. 

From the day he polled his first vote, 
Mr. Sperry has taken an active and intelli- 
gent interest in political affairs, local, state 
and national. Previously a Whig, he 
became connected with the American 
party upon its formation, and in 1854, 
was its principal leader in Connecticut, 
although then one of its youngest members. 
In 1855 he was a delegate from Connecticut 
to the National Convention of the American 
party held in Philadelphia, and was 
appointed a member of the Committee on 
Resolutions. As such he vigorously op- 
posed the incorporation of pro-slavery 
planks in the platform, as false in logic and 
vicious in principle ; and when they were 



37 



adopted he unceremoniously bolted the 
Convention. 

Together with many others of the party 
who held views in consonance with his own, 
he attended the first National Convention of 
the newly-formed Republican Party, which 
was held in New York City in the same 
year, and gave his warm support to the 
candidacy of General Fremont, for whose 
election he labored with extraordinary 
energy during the ensuing campaign. In 
1861 President Lincoln appointed him Post- 
master of New Haven. In 1864 he was a 
member of the Republican National Con- 
vention, held at Baltimore, which renomi- 
nated Lincoln for the presidency. 

In 1887 he was selected by Senators Piatt 
and Hawley and others to write an article 
on " The Advantages of Protection," for 
the Christian Seiretary, a paper published in 
the city of Hartford, in reply to a Free 
Trade article in the same paper by Prof. 
W. G. Sumner. Mr. Sperry's article cov- 



ered a whole page of the paper, and excited 
such wide-spread interest that four hundred 
thousand copies were published to meet the 
immediate demand, and a large edition in 
pamphlet form was afterward published and 
broadly circulated. The Neiv York Tribune 
and other leading journals pronounced it 
one of the strongest as well as one of the 
ablest papers on the question of " Practical 
Protection " ever published. 

In social life he is very popular, and is 
connected, officially and otherwise, with a 
number of the principal local organiza- 
tions, (^f one of these, the Quinnipiack 
Club, probably the oldest in the city, he 
has been president for twelve years or 
more. He is also president of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce of New Haven. He 
was nominated for Congress again in 1894, 
as a Republican, receiving 28,749 votes, 
against 21,821 for Pigott, Democrat; SQQ 
for Griffin, Prohibitionist, and 693 for 
Baldwin, People's. 




Hon. CHARLES ADDISON RUSSELL 



CONGRESSMAN, THIRD DISTRICT 



Hon. Charles Addison Russell was born 
in Worcester, Mass., March 21, 1852. He 
was educated in the public schools, and under 
the tuition of Rev. Harris Greene prepared for 
Yale College, from which he was graduated in 
1872, taking high rank as a scholar and acquir- 
ing much popularity as a comrade. For five 
years he was city editor of the Worcester Press, 
and afterward occupied a similar position on 
the Worcester Spy. In 1880, Mr. Russell mar- 
ried the daughter of Hon. Sabin L. Sayles, of 
Killingly, in this State, and became associated 
with the Sabin L. Sayles Woolen Company as 
its treasurer. In 1881, he was an aide, with 
rank of Colonel, on the staff of Governor Bige- 
low, and in 1883 Killingly sent him to the 
Legislature, where he proved a valuable Repub- 
lican leader, both in the legislative hall and in 
the committee room. Much of his efficiency 
has been due to his newspaper experience, for 
he was a graceful and convincing speaker and 
a polished, forcible writer. His political 
speeches in the campaign of 1884 were highly 



complimented, and were prolific of good results. 
That year, having been nominated for Secretary 
of State, he had the gratification of leading, in 
votes, his co-nominees for the various offices. 

He was elected Congressman from the Third 
in 1886. Since then he has been four times 
reelected, so that now he is serving his fifth 
term. As the advocate and friend of home 
industries he has steadily opposed in Congress 
every attempt to impair the laws under which 
Connecticut manufacturing and mechanical in- 
terests have prospered, and has given his sup- 
port to every measure calculated to advance 
the commercial and agricultural prosperity of 
the State. His years of service at Washington 
have been marked by prompt attention to the 
demands made upon his time and consideration 
by his constituents in matters affecting their 
private interests. Courteous and frank toward 
all who have approached him, he has allied 
men to him by the strongest personal ties, and 
he is now more popular than ever throughout 
his district and the State. 



3a 




Hon. EBENEZER J. HILL 

CONGRESSMAN FOURTH DISTRICT 



Hon. Ebenezer J. Hill was born in Redding, 
Conn., August 4, 1845. He is the son of a 
Methodist minister. Rev. Moses Hill, of Red- 
ding, Conn., and Charlotte Illsley McLellan 
Hill, of Portland, Me. His first ancestor in 
this country was William Hill, of Windsor, 
who was a member of the fall session of the 
first General Assembly of Connecticut, August, 
1639, and whose descendants have ever since 
been continuous residents of Connecticut and 
honorably identified with its history. 

Mr. Hill prepared for college at the public 
school in Norwalk and entered Yale with the 
class of '65, where he remained two years, 
withdrawing to accept a position as civilian 
clerk in the Subsistence Department of the 
Eighteenth Army Corps and continued with 
the army until the close of the war. In 1892 
he received from Yale University the honorary 
degree of Master of Arts. 

For four years he was secretary and treas- 
urer of the Norwalk Iron Works and during 
twenty-two succeeding years was engaged in 
the lumber business. 

He is now president of the Norwalk Street 



Railway Company and the Norwalk Gaslight 
Company, vice-president of the National Bank 
of Norwalk, and associated with several of the 
manufacturing concerns of Norwalk. 

He is a Past Grand Master and served two 
terms as Grand Representative of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows of Connecticut, 
is a vice-president of the State Board of Trade, 
and of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution, and thrice a delegate 
to its National Congress. In 1892 he was chosen 
by the laymen of the New York East Conference 
to represent that body in the Quadrennial Gen- 
eral Conference of Methodism at Omaha. 

He has served twice as burgess of Norwalk, 
twice as chairman of the Board of School Vis- 
itors of Norwalk, was delegate from the Fourth 
Congressional District to the National Repub- 
lican Convention of 1884, was a member of the 
Connecticut Senate in 1886-87, served one term 
upon the Republican State Central Committee, 
and was elected to the Fifty-fourth Congress as 
a Republican, receiving 24,012 votes, against 
18,559 Democratic, 447 Prohibitionist, 284 
Populist, and 173 Socialist Lab.or. 




Hon. JOHN H. HALL 



DISTRICT, NO. I 



Hon. John H. Hall, of Hartford, 
a staunch Democrat, who represents the 
First District in the Senate, was born in 
Portland, March 24, 1849, '^"^ is a descend- 
ant of John Hall, an Englishman, who 
settled in Roxbury, Mass., in 1633. In 
1636 this ancestor came to Hartford, and 
m 1650 moved to Middletown. Samuel 
Hall, third from the emigrant, moved in 
1 7 19 to what is now Portland, where, in 
1849, ^^^ Senator was born. His father, 
Alfred Hall, who died in 1873, had been a 
member of both branches of our Legisla- 
ture. Senator Hall was educated in the 



public schools, in Chase's well-known 
Middletown school and then at the 
Cheshire Episcopal Academy. Preferring 
business to a professional career he went 
to New York and at the early age of 19 
was the head of the foreign and insurance 
departments of the coffee importing house 
of Sturgis, Bennet & Co. 

In 1877 he returned to Portland and 
managed the Pickering Governor Com- 
pany, in which he had bought a large 
interest. In 1884 he was chosen president 
of the Shaler & Hall Quarry Co., and in 
1888 accepted the vice-presidency and 



j^eneral manai^cmcnt ot the well-known 
Colt Patent Fire Arms Manufacturing 
Company, of Hartford. At present he has 
the manag'cment of all three corporatic^ns. 
He declined political otiPice in Portland, 
althoui^h frequently urged to accept the 
nomination for Representative. Since 1890 
he has been a Water Commissioner of 
Hartford, and is a director in the Phoenix 
Insurance Company, the Phoenix Mutual 
Life, the Hartford National Bank, the Dime 
Savings Bank and the Board of Trade, of 
which he was one of the founders. He is 
a member of the Hartford Club and Man- 



hattan Club of New York and the New 
York and New Haven and Larch mont 
Yacht Clubs. He is a Son of the Ameri- 
can Revolution and a thirty-second degree 
Mason. He is also senior warden of the 
Church of the Good Shepherd. Senator 
Hall is a very popular man and well 
represents the important constituency ot 
Hartford. 

In 1870 he married Miss Sarah G. Loines, 
ot New York, a descendant of Quaker 
stock of the Rhode Island Hopkinses, who 
were prominent in the government during 
the Revolution. 



42 




Hon. ALEiMBERT O. CROSBY 

DISTRICT, NO. 2 



Hon. Alembert O. Crosby, Senator 
Jrom the Second District, is a manufacturer 
who is thoroughly identified with the town 
of Glastonbury, where he was born April 
24, 1848. It was in the common school 
that he received his first book knowledge. 
Then he attended a select school and fin- 
ished his education at Wesleyan Academy. 
He is not a graduate of any college, but 
received his wide knowledge from contact 
with men of affairs in the prosecution of a 
successful business. Neither has he held 



any National, State, local or corporate 
office previous to his elevation to the Sen- 
atorial dignity, except that he represented 
Glastonbury in the house of i8go. At that 
session he showed himself to be a caretul 
student of legislation, watching carefully 
not only matters concerning his own town, 
but bearing in mind the greater interests 
of the people at large. In this he was 
peculiarly successful. Senator Crosby is 
a popular man, and acts now, as he has 
always acted, with the Republican party. 



43 




Hon. CHARLES COFFEY 



DISTRICT, NO. 3 



Hon. Charles Coffey, Senator from 
the Third District, is one of the old mem- 
bers of the Senate. He served last term 
as Chairman of the Committee on Temper- 
ance, and was a leader in the Senate. He 
participated in most of the trying debates, 
and was a staunch supporter of his party. 
Senator Coffey was also in the House of 
1 89 1, where he did good service for the 
State. He has always been a Republican 
and devoted to the principles of the party. 
He was born in Granby, Ma}' 4, 1851, and 
is therefore 43 years of age. He is a grad- 



uate of the South wick (Mass.) Academy 
and of the Sufifield Literary Institution. 
Senator Coffey has been highly honored 
bv his fellow citizens. For three years he 
was Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
and he has been a member of the Board of 
Relief. In all these capacities he has 
shown marked ability as an executive offi- 
cer. It is this, together with many per- 
sonal characteristics, that have made him 
the popular man he is among the people. 
Senator Coffey is by occupation a produce 
dealer and a farmer. 



44 




Hon. JOHN BIRGE 

DISTRICT, NO. 4 



Hon. John Birge is the Senator from 
the Fourth District. He belongs in the 
thriving town of Bristol, where he is one 
of the leading manufacturers. He was 
born in that town August 25, 1853, being 
now 41 years of age. His education was 
begun in the common schools, and finished 
by an academic course at Lake Forest 
Academy, Lake Forest, 111. Active busi- 
ness early engaged his attention. For this 
he had predilections and uncommon ability. 
He is at present a member of the firm of 
N. L. Birge & Sons. Alwavs active in 
politics he has been a member of the Re- 



publican State Central Committee for the 
Fourth District. In this important place 
he discharged his duties with great 
efficiency, being an excellent judge of men 
and means. Much of the success of the 
last campaign depended upon his wisdom 
and foresight. He is a believer in pure 
politics and also in the young men's move- 
ment. He was president of the Young 
Men's Republican Club, which is associated 
with the State League, and has been chair- 
man of the Republican Town Committee 
for several terms. This is Senator Birge's 
first appearance in the State government. 



45 




Hon. DANIEL FREDERICK WEBSTER 



DISTRICT, NO. 5 



Hon. Daniel Frederick Webster, 
Senator from the Fifth District, is a prac- 
ticing lawyer who has shown himself a 
wide-eved public servant in the city of 
Waterbury. He is at present clerk of the 
police court in that city, and although 
a member of the Legislature for the 
first time, he has been frequently chosen to 
positions of local importance. As Mayor 
of Waterbury he came into much merited 
prominence, caring for the city's interests 
in a way to merit the ap{)robation of all 
classes of citizens. He was led up to the 
high position through the grades of Coun- 
cilman and Alderman. In addition to 



being now clerk of the police court, he has 
been clerk of the district court and also a 
member of the Town Board of School Vis- 
itors. Senator Webster is a staunch Re- 
publican, a man of readiness in debate, and 
brings much strength to the Senate. He 
was born in Litchfield, March 14, 1853, and 
is therefore 41 years of age. He gradu- 
ated from Dartmouth College in 1874. 

On June 27, 1879, he married Elizabeth 
R. Fox, of Thomaston. They have four 
children — Bradford, Frederick B., Benja- 
min and Howard. He is the efficient 
Chairman of the Committee on Incorpora- 
tions. 



46 



^^v. 





Hon. JOHN WALTER MIX 

DISTRICT, NO. 6 



Hon. John Walter Mix, of Yalesville, 
the Republican who represents the Sixth 
Senatorial District in the Senate, is widely 
known for his social and society, as well as 
political connections. He is a high officer 
of the Maronec fraternity, and a manufac- 
turer of much success. He was born in 
the pretty town of Cheshire, from whence 
many prominent men have come. The 
year of his nativity was 1850, and he is 
now 44 years of age. Educational advan- 
tages he enjoyed with his fellows in the dis- 
trict schools. Military Academy at Che- 
shire, and Golden Hill Institute, Bridge- 
port. He then passed to the business of a 



manufacturer, in which he acquired suc- 
cess and reputation. In 1883 he repre- 
sented the town of Cheshire in the Legis- 
lature, and attended in a creditable manner 
to the duties of that position. When he 
moved to Yalesville, which is in the town 
of Wallingford, he at once assumed a lead- 
ing position in the politics of the 
town. In 1894 he was chosen Select- 
man, again displaying the executive 
ability which has characterized him 
in all his relations. Senator Mix's rare 
business acumen brings to the Senate 
a strength which it might not otherwise 
have possessed. 



47 




Hon. JOHNSON D. DAYTON 

DISTRICT, NO. 7 



Hon. Johnson D. Dayton, Senator from the 
Seventh District, was born in New Milford, 
Litchfield County. When still quite young his 
parents moved to Bethlehem, where they fol- 
lowed the vocation of farming. His father, 
William Dayton, was engaged in the grocery 
business in Ansonia forty years ago, but re- 
moved to Bethlehem and again took up farm- 
ing. The usual experience of a farmer's boy 
was his. He attended the common schools 
when he had time, and by his own close study 
achieved a good education, which was finished 
at Wilbraham, Mass. When 22 years of age 
he went to Westville and entered the employ 
of the Swift, Courtney & Beecher Co., match 
manufacturers. Mr. Dayton's position with 
this firm was one of responsibility and trust. 
He had charge of the box department in which 
was expensive patent machinery, to run it re- 
quiring considerable mechanical ability. He 
remained with this concern several years, and 
twenty years ago he came to this place and 
entered the shoe business. He purchased the 
interest of the elder member of the firm of J. 
Wheeler t*v: Son, who were located at Mr. Day- 
ton's present stand. The name of the new 
firm was Wheeler iS; Dayton. The business 
doubled within a short time, and Mr. Dayton 



bought out his partner, Charles Wheeler, and 
has since conducted the business. Mr. Dayton 
has, by strict attention to business and the 
wants of his customers, built up an immense 
trade, and established a shoe store which is 
noted in the trade as one of the leading shoe 
stores in Connecticut. Senator Dayton is 
known by his fellow-townsmen as an upright, 
conscientious gentleman, and merits the respect 
of all. He is a member of the Masonic order 
and Odd Fellows, and a director of the Y. M. 
C. A. Mr. Dayton has always been a Republi- 
can of the "red hot" order, and has done 
much efficient work for his party. He has 
never held any local offices, but has served his 
party admirably on the town committee. He 
was nominated for Senator two years ago, and 
only consented to run after the urgent appeals 
of his friends. He was defeated by F. W. 
Holden by 94 votes, but ran ahead of the State 
ticket 100 votes. Senator Dayton is a man of 
correct principles and fine judgment, and al- 
though he has never been in the Legislature 
before, he brings to his position a discrimina- 
tion and outside experience that will make his 
presence valuable. 

It is safe to say that this district will be ably 
represented by him, 



48 




Hon. LYMAN HUIVIISTON JOHNSON 

DISTRICT, NO. 8 



Hon. Lyman Humlston Johnson, who 
represents the large Eighth District ot 
New Haven, is a staunch Republican, who 
has held many important offices in the city 
of his residence. He was born outside of 
the city, in Wallingford, where he first 
saw the light October lo, 1845, being 
now, therefore, 49 years of age. He en- 
joyed the privileges of the common schools, 
but did not go to college, preferring rather 
a business life. His parents moved to 
Branford in 1859, and in i862-'65 he learned 
his trade in Hamden, embarking in busi- 



ness for himself in Branford in 1866, where 
he was married. In 1876 he removed to 
New Haven, and he now carries on an ex- 
tensive horseshoeing business in that city. 
He is a member of the Board of Public 
Works of New Haven. In i887-'88 he was 
a Councilman, and in i89i-'92 an Alder- 
man. Senator Johnson is high in Masonic 
circles, being at present Grand General- 
issimo of the Grand Commandery, Knights 
Templars, a thirty-second degree Mason, 
member of Scottish Rite and a Noble of 
the Mystic Shrine. 




-'— i^^C^KX**^^'" 



Hon. benjamin HEMSTEAD LEE 



DISTRICT, NO. 9 



Hon. Benjamin Hempstead Lee, of 
New London, Senator from the Ninth 
District, is a Republican and a manu- 
facturer who has had many advantages, 
and will devote them all to the welfare 
of his constituency and the State. He 
was born in New London, the chief city 
of his district, December 7, 1852, and 
is 42 years of age. He graduated from 
Bartlett High School in that city, and 
also at Schofield's Commercial College at 
Providence. The political party to which 
his services have been given has honored 



him in the past by choosing him a Council- 
man and then an Alderman of New Lon- 
don, but he has never before been ad- 
vanced to a seat in the Legislature. Senator 
Lee, during the last year of his term as 
Alderman, was Chairman of the very im- 
portant Committee of Finance. In social 
life he is much liked. He married a 
daughter of the late Gen. Joseph A. 
Mower. Senator Lee is the first Re- 
publican Senator from the Ninth District 
in twelve years, and his constituents are 
correspondingly gratified over the fact. 



50 




Hon. WILLIAM HENRY PALMER, Jr. 



DISTRICT, NO. lO 



Hon. William Henry Palmer, Jr., who 
represents the Tenth District, is a Repubhcan 
and a vetern of the Civil War. He was born 
in Montville, October i, 1844, and traces his 
ancestry back to about 1650. 

He attended the usual district schools, but 
received no further education except such as 
his multifarious duties of life offered him. In 
this way he has matured an experience that 
will serve the State well. 

In the Civil War he was a musician in the 
2ist Regt., Conn. Vols., since then taking a 
deep interest in Grand Army matters and 
having been for two years Commander of 
Sedgwick Post. After the close of the war he 
went to Middletown, and was for a number of 
years superintendent of the Anowwanna Mills, 
afterward filling the same position in the 
Palmer Tentering Machine Co., of which Com- 
pany he was also treasurer and manager. In 
1886 he became associated with the Palmer 
Bros, at Montville, as superintendent of con- 
struction and machinery, a concern with a 
national reputation for making bed quilts and 



comfortables, now giving employment to about 
350 hands. 

Mr. Palmer has made a number of valuable 
inventions and taken out patents on machinery 
now in use in comfortable manufactories, which 
have brought about great saving of labor and 
facilitated the work. He first held public 
office at Middletown, where he served four 
years in the Common Council and three years 
on the Board of Education. 

As a representative from Norwich in 1892, 
his first term in the Legislature, he served as a 
member of the Judiciary Committee and was 
active in the issues that came before the House. 

He is also one of the ablest members of the 
City Government and admirably qualified to 
fill the position of alderman. 

Mr. Palmer is Chairman of the Fire Depart- 
ment, Secretary of the Norwich Industrial 
Building Company, director of the Norwich 
Savings Society and of the First National 
Bank, also a trustee of the Dime Savings 
Bank. He is also a prominent Mason and a 
member of the Arcanum club. 




Hon. WILLIAM F. GATES 

DISTRICT, NO. II 



Senator William F. Gates, of the Elev- 
enth District, was born in Windham, Conn., 
August 8, 1836, and is now 58 years of age. 
He traces his ancestry to Thomas Gates, one 
of the earliest settlers of Preston. He is a 
farmer by occupation, residing in the north 
part of the town of Lebanon, near the city of 
Willimantic. He was Vice-President of the 
Adams Nickel-Plating and Manufacturing Com- 
pany, a concern that bought, about 1872, the 
right to nickel plate under the patents granted 
to Dr. Isaac Adams, Jr., of Boston, and car- 
ried on a successful business at South Wind- 
ham during the life of those patents. Senator 
Gates has, during the last twenty years, been 
continuously chosen by his townspeople to 
some one or other of the various important 
offices of the town. 



He represented the town of Lebanon in the 
Legislatures of 1877 and 1883. He wears the 
Grand Army button, having served in Co. G, 
26th Regiment of Conn. Vols., and was de- 
tailed as an orderly to Gen. Banks, Headquar- 
ters Department of the Gulf. Six members of 
this company have held seats in the Legislature. 

The losses of this regiment, although serving 
but nine months, either in deaths by disease 
or casualties in battle, exceeded the average 
three years' regiment. He is a Republican. 
He obtains his seat by contest, Clark W. Rey- 
nolds, Democrat, having been declared elected 
by four plurality, the Prohibition vote of the 
town of Waterford, cast for Mr. Wolf, Jr., to 
the number of thirty-six, have been counted 
for him. Senator Gates is the father of the 
clerk of the Senate, Andrew F. Gates. 



53 




^ *v^ 







Hon. GEORGE E. LOUNSBURV 



DISTRICT, NO. 12 



Hon. George E. Lounsrurv, Republican 
Senator from the Twelfth District, was born 
fifty-six years ago in Poundridge, Westchester 
County, N. Y., but, when only a few months 
old, came with his parents to Ridgefield to the 
farm on which he still lives. 

At the age of seventeen he began to teach 
in the public schools, an occupation which he 
followed until he entered college. He gradu- 
ated from Yale College in the class of 1863, 
and from the Berkeley School at Middletown 
in 1866. For a year, as deacon in the Episco- 
pal Church, he had charge of the parishes at 
Thompsonville and Suffield. Leaving this 
work in 1867 on account of throat trouble, he 
embarked with his brother, Phineas C. Louns- 
bury, in the manufacture of boots and shoes, 
and in this business he is still extensively en- 
gaged as senior member of the firm df Louns- 



bury, Mathewson ^: Co., at South Norwalk. 
He is in the sixth generation of descent from 
Richard and Elizabeth Lounsbury, who were 
among the first settlers of the southwestern 
part of the Connecticut colony, and whose land, 
purchased from the Indians, is still known as 
"The Lounsbury Farm." His grandfather, 
Enos Lounsbury, was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tion. His father, Nathan Lounsbury, was a 
member of the Legislature in 1875, and his 
brother, Phineas C. Lounsbury, was Governor 
of the State in 1887 and 1888. 

Senator Lounsbury is Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Finance. Until the last election he 
had never been a candidate for any office. He 
ran ahead of his ticket in the district and re- 
ceived the full benefit of the Republican tidal 
wave. His majority was 1,302 in a district 
which had been considered close and doublfiil. 




Hon. JOHN H. FERRIS 



DISTRICT, XO. 13 



Hon. John H. Ferris, Republican Sena- 
tor from the Thirteenth District, was born 
and educated in the State which he so 
honorably represents. 

Senator Ferris was born in Darien, Oc- 
tober 22, 1842, and is 52 years of age. He 
engaged in business in 1870, being whole- 
sale and retail dealer in coal, wood, blue- 
stone, and masons' material, and since its 
inception a deservedly great success has 
rewarded his well-directed efforts, until 
now his establishment is one of the larg- 
est in the wholesale line in the New Eng- 
land States. 

For thirteen years he was Treasurer of 
the City of South Norwalk. He has been 
a Councilman, and is a director in the City 



National Bank, and in the Norwalk Iron 
Works, the Norwalk Lock Company, the 
Norwalk Gas Light Company ; also Presi- 
dent of the Norwalk Hospital Association, 
and Vice-President of South Norwalk 
Savings Bank. 

He was in the House of 1887, and served 
as House Chairman of the Committee on 
Banks. He was also in the House of 1889, 
and served in the same capacity. In 1893 
he was chosen to the Senate, where he 
became Chairman of the Committee on 
Banks, also presiding officer of the upper 
branch of the Connecticut Legislature of 
1895. On January 9, 1895, Senator Ferris 
took his seat as Vrcsideni pro tonporc ot the 
Senate. 



54 




Hon. WILLIAM H. MARIGOLD 

DISTRICT, NO. 14 



Hon. William H. Marigold, Republi- 
can Senator from the Fourteenth District, 
is a popular citizen who has been highly 
honored by his party. He has been Coun- 
cilman and Alderman and twice Mayor of 
Bridgeport, defeating strong Democratic 
candidates. He was born in Waterbury, 
September 17, 1858, and is 36 years of age. 
He obtained his education in the common 
and night schools. He learned the trade 
of a practical printer in the office of The 



Waterbury American. In 1881 he went to 
Bridgeport and started a job printing 
office, in which he has been markedly 
successful. In secret society circles he 
is well known, and was Grand Master 
of the Odd Fellows of this State in 
1893, and is now Representative to 
the Sovereign Grand Lodge. Senator 
Marigold is President of the Bridgeport 
Republican Club, and is a leader in his 
party . 



55 




Hon. henry BERND 



DISTRICT. XO. 15 



IIox. Hexrv BERXD,of Danbury, Senator 
from the Fifteenth District, is a native of 
AUentown, Pa., and was born January 15, 
1837. He comes from one of the oldest fami- 
lies of the United States, his ancestors hav- 
in<T settled in the vicinity of the present city 
of Philadelphia in the A'ear 1732. where their 
descendants are still to be found. In ad- 
dition to his own recog'nized abilities and 
successful business career, Mr. Bernd has, 
therefore, the prestige and honor which are 
always associated with, and are inseparable 
from, a long lineage of honorable ancestry. 

In 1856 Mr. Bernd left AUentown, where 
he had learned, thoroughly, the trade ot 
cigar manufacturer, and went to Danbury, 
where he at once established himself in the 
cigar business, which he conducted with 
great success for a period of thirt}- years. 

In 1885, having acquired a handsome 
competency from his successfully managed 
business, and his son having attained his 
majority, he transferred his business to him, 
and has since devoted his attention almost 
whollyto public affairs, for which he is ad- 
mirably adapted. On March 3, 1885, he was 
elected Burgess for two years, and filled 
th'j office so successfully that during the 



same year he was elected Third Select- 
man, and in October, 1886, he was elected 
First Selectman. In 1887 he was defeated, 
but was again returned as First Select- 
man in 1888, and in 1889 was a third time 
elected to this responsible position, vir- 
tually the highest in the gift of the town, 
by the largest majority cast up to that time 
for Selectman in I^anbur}-. This was all the 
more gratifying, and showed the high es- 
teem and confidence in which he is held by 
the public, as he is a staunch Republican, 
while Danbury is strongly Democratic. 

Mr. Bernd is a representative prop- 
erty owner of the city, being proprietor of 
Judd's Block and other property, and he is 
a director of the Danbury Gas and Elec- 
tric Light Company, and was President of 
the Electric Light Company before it was 
sold to the Gas Company. He is also a 
prominent Mason, having passed to the de- 
grees of Knight Templars and the Ancient 
Egyptian Rite, of which the Shrine is lo- 
cated in the valley of Bridgeport. 

This is his first term in the Legislature. 
He occupies a prominent place in the Sen- 
ate, and is Chairman of the Joint Com- 
mittee on Humane Institutions. 



56 




Hon. RANDOLPH HENRY CHANDLER 

DISTRICT, NO. l6 



Hon. Randolph Henry Chandler, 
representing the Sixteenth District, is a 
staunch Republican. By profession he is a 
lawyer, and was born in Thompson, Janu- 
ary II, 1853. His age, therefore, is 41. 
He attended Phillips Academy at Andover, 
Mass., and graduated with honor. For 
two terms he was elevated by his towns- 



people t(j serve them in a legislative capac- 
ity. This was in the Houses of 1879 and 
1880. He has also held many town offices, 
and is now a Justice of the Peace. Senator 
Chandler has had ample advantages to serve 
the people well, and will lend material aid to 
the Senate in its deliberations over general 
legislati(Mi and the political situation. 



57 




Hon. CLARAMON HUNT 



DISTRICT, NO. 17 



Hon. Claramon Hunt, Senator from 
the Seventeenth District, is a strong Re- 
publican, who began his education in the 
little red school house, He continued it 
in the activities of life, the attrition devel- 
oping his natural abilities in an excellent 
degree. Senator Hunt was born in Black- 
stone, Mass., April 25, 1842. He was 
chosen to the House of 1893, where he did 
excellent work. He was for sixteen years 
the popular and successful manager of the 
Wauregan store, during which time he was 



Postmaster. For the past twelve years he 
has been treasurer of the Sterling Dyeing 
and Finishing Company, one of the most 
enterprising manufacturing concerns in the 
State, and of which he was one of the 
organizers. 

He has creditably held several public 
offices, and is a prominent member of sev- 
eral secret societies. Senator Hunt's wide 
experience with men of affairs makes him, 
with his other qualifications, a most valu- 
able Senator. 



58 




Hon. GEORGE W. SiMITH 

DISTRICT, XO. 1 8 



Hon. George W. Smith, of New Hart- 
ford, Senator from the Eighteenth District, 
is a Republican and a Director in the 
Greenwoods Company, a prosperous man- 
ufacturing corporation making cotton duck. 
He is also Town Treasurer, a position he 
has held for many years. He has also 
been Registrar of Voters, and for four years 



Postmaster of New Hartford. Senator 
Smith was born in Pine Meadow, Conn., 
forty-hve years ago. He attended Wes- 
leyan Academy at Wilbraham, Mass., 
for three years. Senator Smith has 
a wide acquaintance and popularity, and 
is a most valuable acquisition to the 
Senate. 



59 




Hon. DONALD T. WARNER 



DISTRICT. NO. 19 



Hon. Donald T. Warner is a Republi- 
can, and represents the Nineteenth District 
for the first time. He has never before sat 
in the Legislature, but he has alw avs been 
a prominent man in the communitv. He 
was born in Salisbury. December 15, 1830, 
and is therefore 44 years of age. He had 
the advantages of studving law with Judge 
D. J. Warner, having previousiv been a 
student at Salisbury Academy, and in the 
class of '72 at Trinitv College. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1873. Senator War- 
ner has held many local offices. He has 
been Judge of Probate for the Salisburv 



District since Januar}-. 1885. From No- 
vember. 1S74. to October. 1885. he was 
Postmaster of the town. He has also large 
business connections, being President ot 
the Brook Pit Mining Companv. Director 
of the National Iron Bank, and Treasurer 
of the Salisbury Cutlery Handle Com- 
panv. He is still an active practicing 
lawver and has a wide acquaintance. 
His popularity is attested bv the fact 
that he has manv friends in the oppo- 
site political partv who take pleas- 
ure in seeing him honored by public 
trusts. 




Hon. HEMAN 0. AVERILL 



DISTRICT, NO. 20 



Hon. Heman O. Averill, Senator from 
the Twentieth District, isa Republican, like 
the great majority ot his colleagues. He 
has had much political experience and was 
in the famous deadlock House of 1891, 
where he maintained the position ol his 
party upon all matters that came before 
that body. He is a native of Washington, 
this State, where he was born August 20, 
[856, being 38 years of age at the present 
time. Early he attended the public schools 
of his neighborhood. Then he went to the 



academy, and finally entered the scientific 
department of Oberlin College, from which 
he graduated with credit. He is held in 
great respect by his town and district and 
has been chosen to fill nearly all the local 
or town offices at one time or another. In 
all of these he has displayed natural ability 
of a his:h order. Senator Averill, who is 
a practical farmer, takes great pride in the 
fact that the farm he owns and occupies has 
never been sold since it was deeded to his 
lineal ancestor by an Indian chief in 1746. 



61 




Hon. CHARLES E. CHAPMAN 



DISTRICT, NO. 21 



Hon. Charles E. Chapman, representing 
the Twenty-first District in tlie Senate, is a 
Republican of sterling integrity and wide 
experience in a business way and in politics. 
He was born in Westbrook, October 6, 1853. 
the son of Charles and Dencey Chapman. 
Common schools of his native town fur- 
nished him with the beginnings of his edu- 
cation and the Seabury Institute of Saybrook 
finished it off. Early in life, or at the age 
of sixteen years, he became interested in 
shad fisheries, and until about twelve years 
ago he continued work in this important 
branch. In 1883 he became a farmer and has 
been one of the most successful in Southern 
Connecticut. The i)eople of Senator Chap- 
man's town chose him to manv local offices 
and in 1889 sent him to the Legislature, where 



he was a member of the Committee on Insur- 
ance and also Clerk of the Committee on 
Claims. In 1891, the deadlock Legislature, 
he was House Chairman of the Committee on 
Fisheries. 'During his eventful session he was 
one of the stanch defenders of his party's 
principles. Senator Chapman is married and 
has nine children, his wife's maiden name 
being Miss Ella Dee. Since 1889 the Senator 
has been a director of the Saybrook Bank. 
During the present session of the General 
.•\ssembly Senator Chapman has filled the po- 
sition of Senate chairman on the Fishery Com- 
mittee, being very much interested in the 
stocking of the rivers and streams of the State 
with food fish for the benefit of its people, 
also the cultivation of shell fish along the 
southern borders of the State. 



(j-i 




Hon. THOMAS R. PICKERING 



DISTRICT, NO. 2: 



Hon. Thomas R. Pickering, of Portland, who 
represented the Twenty-second District, but 
who died on February 21, 1895, a few weeks 
after taking his seat, was one of the most 
widely-known men in either house. He had 
been before the people for years, not only as a 
successful manufacturer, but as a public man. 
He ably represented the United States at inter- 
national exhibitions at Paris, Vienna and 
Australia, and in all these relations had been 
warmly commended both ofificially and in pri- 
vate. His executive ability, which Icil him to 
be so successful as a manufacturer, had like- 
wise made him eminent in all his public duties. 



Senator Pickering was born in England in 
1 83 1, and was therefore 63 years of age. He 
came early to this country and located in New 
York City, where he studied in the public 
schools and Mechanics' Institute. He was 
educated as a mechanical engineer, and com- 
ing to Portland founded a business that has 
for years been widely known. It is the Picker- 
ing Governor Company, of which he was presi- 
dent. He never sat in the Legislature before, 
nor held many of the local offices, but his 
abundant experience made him one of the nota- 
ble members of the Senate. He was a Re- 
publican. 



63 




Hon. JOHN M. DOUGLAS 



DISTRICT, NO. 22 



Hon. John M. Douglas, elected to fill the 
place of Senator Thos. R. Pickering (deceased), 
of the Twenty-second District, was born in 
Norwich, Conn., Feb. 6, 1839. When only a few 
months old his father, Benjamin Douglas, came 
to this city, and with his brother founded the 
W. & B. Douglas Pump Works. Benjamin 
Douglas was Lieutenant-Governor under Gov- 
ernor Buckingham during the war period. 

John M. Douglas was educated in the public 
schools of Middletown, and in 1857 graduated 
from the then famous Chase school of this 
town. In the following year he entered busi- 
ness at the pump works and in 1868 was elected 
secretary and treasurer of the Corporation. 
Upon the death of Benjamin Douglas last year 
he was elected president of the company and 
still holds the offices of secretary and treasurer. 
He was also elected Vice-President of the 



Air Line Railroad on its completion in 187 1. 
Mr. Douglas has always called himself a 
business man and has never sought political 
honors. He was, however, elected to the Re- 
publican town committee as soon as he was 21 
years old and has held various political honors 
since that time. In 1861 he was elected to 
the lower branch of the Legislature, the young- 
est member of the house in that year, and was 
on the Judiciary Committee. In the following 
year he was re-elected and served on the Rail- 
road Committee. In 187 1 he was elected 
Senator from this district and was Chairman 
of the Railroad Committee. He was a member 
of the National Convention that nominated 
Hayes, and was a Delegate-at-Large from Con- 
necticut with Henry C. Robinson, Augustus 
Brandegee and Samuel Fessenden in the con- 
vention that nominated Garfield. 



64 




Hon. JAMES PINNEO LITTLE 



DISTRICT, NO. 23 



Hon. James Pixneo Little, of the Twenty- 
third District, son of Samuel Little and Clarissa 
Pinneo, was born in Columbia, December 15, 
1841. He is of Colonial descent, Samuel Little 
being a direct descendant of Thomas Little, 
who came from Devonshire, England, to Ply- 
mouth in 1930, and Clarissa Pinneo beingadirect 
descendant of James Pinneo, who came from 
France to escape religious persecution about 
the year 1620. 

Senator Little received his education in the 
common and select schools of the town. He 
has always resided in his native town, where 
he has conducted the business of farming, and 
for the last fourteen years the sale of commer- 
cial fertilizers in connection with it, in which 
enterprise he has built up a substantial busi- 
ness. He has held the various town offices, 
having been for several years Town Treasurer, 
six years a member of the Board of Education, 
several years Town Auditor. He has also served 
on the Board of Selectmen and Board of Re- 



lief. In 1890 he was elected Representative 
from his town and served through the memor- 
able deadlock session. During that session he 
was Chairman of the Republican County Cau- 
cus and one of the committee appointed by the 
representatives from his county to act with the 
County Commissioners in securing plans and 
estimates for an addition to the jail at Tolland. 
At the Republican Senatorial Convention for 
the Twenty-third District, held at Andover in 
( )ctober, 1894, he was nominated for Senator by 
acclamation, and in November was elected by a 
majority of over 300. He entered upon his 
duties as Senator unpledged to any man or 
measure. In politics Mr. Little has always 
been a Republican, and where any party meas- 
ures are concerned will unquestionably vote 
with that party. 

In the present session he is Chairman of the 
Committee on New Towns and Probate Dis- 
tricts, and also of the Committee on Federal 
Relations. 



60 




Hon. EDWARD E. FULLER 



DISTRICT, 

Hon. Edward E. Fuller, of Tolland, Sena- 
tor from the Twenty-fourth District, comes of 
one of the oldest and most respected families in 
Connecticut. 

His great-grandfather, Deacon Abijah Fuller, 
of Hampton, had the honor, as the trusted ser- 
geant and friend of General Putnam, of having 
in charge the fortifying of Bunker Hill the 
night before the famous battle. 

His father, the late Lucius S. Fuller, was 
one of the leading men of his section, having 
resided in Tolland since 1816, and having 
served his town, county and State in various 
capacities with honor to himself and to his con- 
stituents. He was a member of the Legisla- 
ture from Tolland in 1854; a member of the 
Senate in 1863 and 1864 from the then old Twen- 
tieth District; a delegate to the Republican Na- 
tional Convention that nominated Cirant in 
1872, and a trustee of the State Hospital for 
the Insane at Middletown for more than 
twenty years. 

The eldest brother of the present Senator, 
John B. Fuller, of Tolland, was a member of 
the Legislature from Tolland in 1878. 

His only living brother, Lucius H. Fuller, of 
Putnam, was a member of the Legislature 
from Putnam in 1881 and 1882, and the Sena- 
tor from that district in 1889. 

Edward E. Fuller, the present Senator, is a 
Republican in politics, as was also his father 
and brothers. He was born in Tolland, May 
13. i^53i being therefore now in his 42d year, 
and has never married. 

His early life was spent on a farm, amid the 
environments of an excellent home, and a good 
|)ublic school system. 

Leaving the public schools of his native 
town he took an academic course, and then 
entered a business college in Philadelphia, 
graduating in the spring of 1871. In the fall 
of that year he entered the office of the -Etna 
Insurance Company of Hartford, where he 
remained until compelled to resign on account 
of ill health in January, 1882. In June, 1883, 



NO. 24 

having completely recovered his health, he was, 
on the death of his brother, John B. Fuller, 
elected to succeed him as secretary of The 
Tolland County Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, which position he still occupies. 

Heretofore Senator Fuller has declined all 
offers of political preferment, choosing, rather, 
to devote himself entirely to business, in which 
he has been very successful. The only political 
offices which he has ever accepted are those of 
town auditor and member of the board of 
education, of the latter of which he is at the 
present time a member. 

For several years he was treasurer and 
chairman of the Society's Committee of the 
Congregational Church of Tolland. 

He is a director in various financial institu- 
tions, and is also a veteran member of Com- 
pany K, First Regiment, C. N. G., having 
been a charter member of the active company 
at its organization in 1879. 

Senator Fuller is very high in Masonry, hav- 
ing taken his 32d degree, and being also a 
member of the Mystic Shrine. 

He is at present Worshipful Master of Fay- 
ette Lodge, No. 69; Excellent King of Adoni- 
ram Chapter, No. 18; and Thrice Illustrious 
Master of Adoniram Council, No. 14, A. F. 
and A. M., all of Rockville. 

He is also a member of the I. O. of O. F. , 
being at present Vice-Grand of Rising Star 
Lodge, No. 49, of the same place. 

He is chairman of the Committee on Insur- 
ance at this session, a position for which he is 
peculiarly well fitted, having devoted his entire 
business life of more than twenty years to that 
occupation. He is also chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Manual and Roll. 

Senator Fuller's wide business and social ac- 
quaintance, the high regard in which he is held 
by all who know him, and his recognized ability 
as a sound thinker, logical reasoner, and fluent 
speaker, make him a most useful and capable 
legislator, both for his district and for the 
State. 



66 




SPEAKER SAMUEL FESSENDEN 



OF STAMFORD 



It may fairly be said that " Sam " Fes- 
SENDEN to-day ranks as one of Connecti- 
cut's most representative citizens — a leader 
in the politics of his party, strong with the 
bar of the State, well known and hig-hly 
esteemed in every county, with a firm 
hold on the affections of the people. 
The reason is not hard to find. Mr. Fes- 
senden is by no means an arrogant man, 
but is noted for his geniality, loyalty to his 
friends and public spirit. These traits, and 
his intimate friendship with James G. Blaine 
and other great statesmen, have naturally 
brought him much in touch with national 
affairs, so that his influence in Washington 
is already ver}- considerable and has 
steadily increased. 

The subject of this sketch comes of a 
family long distinguished for its ability. 



legislative experience and patriotism. 
William Pitt Fessenden, of Maine, Speaker 
Fessenden's uncle, made a record as Sena- 
tor so active and useful during the war 
and trying period of Reconstruction, thai 
his services arc to this day gratefullv 
remembered by his constituency and many 
outside of it, who are fond of recalling 
his noble appearance and dignified bear- 
ing, oratorical ability and remarkable 
powers of hard work. Samuel Fessenden's 
father — the late Hon. Samuel C. Fessenden 
— and his uncle — the late Hon. Thomas A. 
Fessenden — were both members of Con- 
gress from Maine, and made excellent 
records for themselves and the people of 
their respective districts. 

Samuel Fessenden, the subject of this 
sketch, was born in Maine, in the town of 



Rockland, on April 12, 1847. The stock 
from which he comes, however, was among 
the oldest and most distinguished in Wind- 
ham County and indeed, in old-time Con- 
necticut. His mother was Miss Mary 
Abigail Grosvenor Abbe, whose ancestry, 
through Joshua, Phineas, Ebenezer and 
Samuel Abbe, is prominently and honor- 
ably connected with the history of the 
historic towns of Windham and Pomfret. 

Mr. Fessenden was fitting himself for 
college, at Lewiston Academy, when the 
war broke out. Young Fessenden was too 
vigorous and brave a boy not to respond 
at once to his country's call of duty. He 
promptly resigned his collegiate ambitions, 
when only sixteen, to enlist as a private 
in the Seventh Maine Battery, and he 
afterward did faithful service under Grant 
in the campaigns of the Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor and Peters- 
burg. 

General Grant thought so well of him 
that he recommended his appointment as 
first lieutenant and then captain in the 
Second U. S. Infantr}-. But young Mr. 
Fessenden believed he could render better 
service by remaining in the artillery. He 
therefore modestly declined promotion in 
the regulars and joined the First Maine 
Battery. Afterward he was placed on 
General Howe's staff and remained with 
him till the troops were mvistered out in 
1865. 

Undaunted by the length of time he had 
been obliged to forego his classical and 
legal studies, Mr. Fessenden applied him- 
self with such good effect that he was ad- 
mitted to the Harvard Law School, from 
which he was graduated in 1869, with 
promise of that ability as a law3'er which 
has characterized him ever since. He was 
admitted to the Fairfield County bar (his 
family having in the meantime moved 
from Maine to Stamford), and soon became 
a member of the leading law firm of Ferris 
& Child. No one questions his solid at- 
tainments in the underlying principles of 



his profession, but as a pleader and jury 
lawyer Mr. Fessenden's success has been 
little short of phenomenal. His tact, per- 
severance, acquaintance, personal magnet- 
ism, oratorical ability and knowledge of 
human nature, have combined to win him 
a reputation and secure him a fortune 
among the highest enjoyed by any lawyers 
in the State. As State's attorney he has 
always been painstaking in the discharge 
of all the duties intrusted to his charge, 
antl as a representative of important priv- 
ate interests, he has repeatedly won big 
victories against great odds and with 
entire honor to himself. 

It is natural that a man of Mr. Fessen- 
den's active temperament and varied tal- 
ents should be drawn into current politics. 
His honors have, however, come to him 
unsolicited, rather than from an}- personal 
efibrt on his part. When a young man, only 
27 years ot age, he was returned to the 
General Assembly as Representative from 
Stamford, and at once made his mark as a 
member of the Judiciary Committee and 
leader in a Legislature containing many 
prominent men. Those who are judges of 
eloquence are fond of recalling his brilliant 
speeches. While on the floor of the House 
none of his colleagues, perhaps, equaled 
young Mr. Fessenden in personal popu- 
larity and practical influence. The same 
success on a larger scale was repeated in 
1879, when he was again returned to the 
House of Representatives and fairly di- 
vided the honors of leadership with the 
Hon. Henry C. Robinson, of Hartford. 

In 1872, Governor Jewell, whose intimate 
personal friend he was and continued to 
be, appointed Samuel Fessenden as Judge- 
Advocate General of the Fourth regimental 
district of the Connecticut National Guard. 

Entering the arena of national politics 
Mr. Fessenden was appointed a delegate 
in 187610 the convention of the Republican 
party in Cincinnati, which, after an excit- 
ing discussion, finally nominated Ruther- 
ford B. Hayes for President. He was also 



a delep^atc to the convention of tlic party 
in 1880. 

In 1884 Samuel Fesscndcn was once 
more a delegate, and was afterward urg'ed 
by Mr. Blaine and other great leaders 
of the party to accept the secretaryship of 
the Republican National Committee, and 
did so, winning a ho3t of new friends from 
all over the country for his superior execu- 
tive ability, far sightedncss and untiring 
zeal. He is still a member of this com- 
mittee for the State of Connecticut, and 
for real influence is not outranked by any 
of his distinguished colleagues. 

Mr. Fessenden leads both a busy and a 
happy life with his family at Stamford. 
His law offices are commodious and liis 
residence is charmingly located. Hospi- 
tality seems to be his motto, and he is 
equally cordial in manner to the most 
prominent citizens and humble visitors. 

Mr. Fessenden married Miss Helen M. 
Davenport, of Stamford, daughter of Theo- 
dore and Harriet (Grant Cheseborough) 
Davenport, a direct descendant of Rev. 
John Davenport, " the founder and patri- 
arch of New Haven," and of Abraham 
Davenport, her great-grandfather, born in 
Stamford in 181 5, who opposed adjourn- 
ment of the Legislature on the famous dark- 
day, the 19th of May, 1780, and ordered 
candles to be brought when it was sup- 
posed that the end of the world was at 
hand. " On the ground that the Day of 
Judgment was either at hand or it was not. 
If it is not, then it is no cause for an ad- 
journment; if it is, I choose to be found 



doing m}' duty," whirii incident has been 
grapliically described in verse by Whittier 
in ids famous poem, " Tent on the 
Beach." 

The campaign just closed furnished new 
and convincing j)r()of of Sjjcaker Fessen- 
den's wide popularity. He was returned 
for the third time as member from Stam- 
ford, at the November election of 1894, by 
the largest majority ever given to iiim or 
any other resitlent of that town for any 
elective office, and was at once nominated 
for S])eaker by many of the leading news- 
pa|)ers of the State. Though other candi- 
dates at first appeared in the field, one by 
one the}- all witiidrew in his favor until on 
the night of the caucus he was nominated 
l:)y acclamation, each one of his former 
leading opponents paying the highest 
tributes in his favor. In his election to 
the Speakership, he received the unani- 
mous vote of his party. 

Such a brilliant and spontaneous compli- 
ment is one of which any politician and his 
friends may justly be proud and on which 
they are justified in basing their hopes and 
expectations for the future. Speaker Fes- 
senden's name has several times in recent 
yearsbeen prominently mentioned through- 
out the State in connection with the Senate 
of the United States, but so far always 
without his own consent. Judging by his 
past, it is safe to say that whatever may 
be his decision, it will be based on con- 
servatism, a fair regard for the claims of 
others, and a profound regard for the wel- 
fare of Connecticut. 



(iU 




WILLIAM H. WATROUS 



William H. Watrous is one of the 
leading business men of Hartford and of 
Connecticut. He was born in Hartford. 
July i8, 1841, educated in the Arsenal 
school and attended the Hartford High 
school for two years. At the age of 14 he 
began to learn the trade of electroplating 
in the factory of his uncles, Rogers Broth- 
ers, the buildings now owned and occupied 
b^'the Jewell Belting Company. In 1861 he 
Avas among the first to enlist in Rifle Com- 
pany A, First Regiment, C. V., and served 
under Senator Hawley. In 1862 he was 
made First Sergeant of Company B, 
Twenty-fourth Regiment, C. V., and was 
afterward promoted to Second Lieutenant 
of the company. After the war he re- 



turned to his business, and in 1870 founded 
the Rogers Cutlery Company with his 
uncle, Asa H. Rogers. Soon after Mr. 
Rogers withdrew and in 1879 he purchased 
one-half the stock of the William Rogers 
Manufacturing Company and became 
President, Treasurer and General Man- 
ager of both companies, in which positions 
he has since continued. These companies 
employ 150 hands and sell oyer S6oo,ooo 
worth of goods per year. He is also sole 
owner and proprietor of the Norwich 
Cutlery Company, and has lately become 
interested in the Eagle Sterling Company 
of Naubuc, manufacturing solid silver- 
ware. He is a Republican, but never held 
office till elected .\lderman last year. 




ROBERT W. BARRETT 



Robert W. Barrett is a native dt 
Enfield, Conn., and 45 yeai"s of age. After 
an education in the common schools he 
came to this city and for a long time he has 
been at the head of the well-known firm of 
contractors and builders, Barrett Brothers, 



on Trumbull street. Mr. Barrett is an 
active member of the Democratic party in 
Hartford, and has served in the city gov- 
ernment as Councilman and Alderman. He 
is at present an Alderman from the Seventli 
Ward. 




CHARLES F. FROIDEVAUX 



Charles F. Fkoidkvaux, of Avon, is 
one of the young members of the House 
and ot the Republican party. He was 
born at Collinsville, April 4, 1867, and 
attended public school in Avon. Later 
he took a course in the Collinsville hio^h 
school. He is a good German scholar 
and now holds the office of School Com- 



mittee for the Sixth Avon District. He 
went to work for the Collins Company 
in 1884 and in 1887 entered the machine 
department of that company where he is 
at present employed. He is a popular 
man, a member of V^illage Lodge, No. 
29, F. and A. M., and of Humboldt Lodge, 
No. 417, D. O. H. 




WILLIS H. UPSON 



Willis H. Upson, of Berlin, was born 
in Kensington, this State, March 29, 1858, 
brought up on a farm and educated in the 
common schools and in Prof. Camp's Sem- 
inary in New Britain. 

He is Treasurer of the Berlin Savings 
Bank, and is also engaged in mercantile 
business. Mr. Upson was Postmaster in 
Kensington for five years prior to Septem- 
ber, 1893. He is a Republican, and 
received the largest majority in years, 
if not the largest majority ever given, 
in his town for a member of the Legis- 
lature. 

Mr. Upson \vas married in 1883 to 
Miss Clara Warner, daughter of Eras- 
tus W. Warner, of Walcott, and they 
have three children, Harold, aged nine; 



Warren, seven, and Lura, aged four. 
The Upson family has always been 
closely identified with the history of Wal- 
cott (formerly Farmington and afterward 
Southington), where its members have been 
universally esteemed and respected, being 
prominent in all enterprises looking to the 
improvement and best interests of their 
town. Mr. Upson is a descendant of 
Thomas Upson, who lived in Hartford in 
1638, and was an original settler and pro- 
prietor of Farmington. Stephen Upson, 
son of Thomas, is spoken of as "one ot 
the Committee to settle bounds with 
Wooflbury in April, 1702," and held 
most of the town offices, being a very 
public-spirited and active man in the com- 
munity. 




GEORGE D. GABB 



George D. Gabb, of Bloomfield, is one of 
the Democratic members, and was born in 
that town Aug. i8, 1845, where he received 
a common-school education. He carries 
on the business of manufacturing cigars. 



He has built up an excellent business. Mr. 
Gabb is a popular member of several secret 
societies and an active member of the im- 
portant Committee on Railroads, also of 
the Committee on Contingent Expenses. 



1 




GEORGE HARRIS HALL 



George Harris Hall is a native of 
Bristol, and represents the place of his 
birth in the Assembly. He is forty years 
of age and was educated in the common 
schools. He has been with J. H. Sessions 
& Son for twenty-four 3'ears, the last four- 
teen years as a contractor. He has been 
an active Republican and useful citizen; 
for nine years chief of the fire department, 



three years tax collector and two years 
fire commissioner. He was re-elected to 
the latter position last October for three 
years. 

INL". Hall has the honor of receiving the 
largest majorit}' vote ever given to a rep- 
resentative from his town. 

He has been a member of the Town 
Committee for the past nine years. 




CHARLES A. REYNOLDS 



Charles A. Reynolds, of Bristol, is a 
Republican, 57 years old and a native of 
Winsted, where he was educated in the 
public schools. 

At the breaking- out of the war he en- 
listed in the Nineteenth Connecticut Vol- 
unteer Infantry, afterward changed to 
the Second Connecticut Heavy Artiller}^ 
as a private, and was with his regiment in 
every engagement in which they were 
called to participate, with one exception. 
At the battle of Winchester, September 
19, 1864, he was promoted to Second 
Lieutenant, and soon after received a 
First Lieutenant's commission. He was 
discharged, with the rest of his regiment, 
at Fort Ethan Allen, Va., August 18, 
1865. 



At the close of the war he came to 
Forestville and entered the employ of the 
E. N. Welch ^Lnnufacturing Compan}-, 
remaining with them to the present time. 
Mr. Reynolds served one term as Select- 
man, one term as Assessor and was Regis- 
trar of Electors in Second District for a 
period of ten years. Mr. Reynolds was 
also a charter member of Manross Post, 
G. A. R., and its Commander for one 
term. 

Mr. Reynolds' first vote was cast for 
Governor Buckingham, and his second for 
Lincoln. 

From that time to this he has voted the 
Republican ticket onlv. He received the 
largest majority ever given to a candidate 
in the Second voting- district of Bristol. 




SERENO ALDERMAN 



Sereno Alderman, of Burlington, the 
subject of this sketch, was born in Bur- 
lington, July lo, 1853, and is therefore 41 
years of age. He comes of a family that 
has lived in Burlington for three genera- 
tions and previous to that for a generation 
or two in Granby, so it can be said that 
he comes of good old New England stock. 
Mr. Alderman was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native town, and at an 
early age commenced life for himself, and 
has been successful in his chosen occupa- 
tion, that of farming. He has held the 
offices of Assessor, First Selectman, and is 



at present a member of the Board of 
Selectmen. Always a Republican when 
running for office, he has been elected in 
a town which gives 70 Democratic major- 
it}' in a total vote ot 275. These figures 
show what is thought of Mr. Alderman in 
his own home town. His famil}- consists 
of a wife, whom he married in New Haven 
in 1880, her name being Miss Rosa Sarsel. 
In the Legislature of 1895, Mr. Alderman 
served on the Committee on Woman 
Suffrage, was regular in his attendance, 
and at all times looked carefully after the 
interests of liis constituents. 




CHARLES W. ROBERTS 



Charles W. Roberts, of East Hartford, 
was born in that town fifty-four years ago, and 
is probably better known to its citizens than 
any other resident, as he has been prominent 
in public affairs for a quarter of a century, and 
honored with the principal offices in the gift of 
his townsmen. 

His boyhood and youth were spent on the 
farm, and soon after attaining his majority he 
became interested in politics, his well-balanced 
mind, his readiness in grasping questions of 
public interest and need, and his many other 
admirable qualities of mind and heart all con- 
tributed to make him a forceful character in 
the political Ufe of his section. 

For some years he was a Republican, but in 
1875 he became a Democrat. 

Mr. Roberts has been a Selectman of East 
Hartford for several terms since 1872, filling 



that office at the present time. Notable 
among his work is the improvement of the main 
streets, the macadamizing being largely due to 
his efforts, as may also be said of the work on 
town bridges and the placing upon the State of 
the maintenance of the Hartford Bridge. 

He has also served as Town Auditor, Town 
Treasurer, and, since 1882, has been almost 
continuously in the Legislature, his peculiar 
aptitude for the work leading to his appoint- 
ment on the Bridge Commission. 

Mr. Roberts is a member of only one society, 
the grange of which he has been Master and 
Secretary. He was a member of Thomas H. 
Seymour Lodge, Knights of Honor, while that 
organization was in existence. 

In 1 86 1 he married Adelaide L., daughter of 
Ashbel Brewer. Three children have been 
born to them, one of whom is living. 




SAMUEL J. ALLEN 



Samuel J. Allex, ot East Windsor, 
is a native of East Windsor, and 51 
years old. His education was com- 
pleted in the Westfield Academ)^ West- 
field, Mass., and at Eastman's Business 



College, Poughkeepsie. He has been 
Postmaster at Melrose since February, 
1888, but resigned December i, 1894. 
Farming is his business. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 




CHARLES C. GEORGIA 



Charles C. Georgia, of Farmington. 
was born in Unionville. December 22. 1854, 
and since leaving school has been associated 
with his father in the general merchandise 
business established bv him over thirty-five 
years ago. He was Postmaster under 
President Harrison from June. 1890, to 
October. 1894. having held over his time 
from June to October. 

Mr. Georgia is much interested in Ma- 
sonic affairs, and is a member of Evening 



Star Lodge, Xo. loi. A. F. l^ A. >L. Wash- 
ington Commanderv Knights Templar of 
Hartford, and a thirtv-second degree 
Mason, also a member of Pyramid Temple. 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and a charter 
member of Agenda Lodge, Xo. 31. K. 
of P. 

He is a member of the Committee on 
Fisheries, being an ardent disciple of Izaak 
Walton, and never misses a meeting of that 
Committee. 



so 




JOHN P. LEWIS 



John P. Lewis, of Farmington, was born 
in Winsted, this State, November 23, 1836, 
and was educated in the common schools 
of those da3's. 

He has been in the farming and lumber 
business for a long time, and has held 
many public offices of trust, acting as Se- 
lectman, Justice of the Peace, Assessor, 
etc., now being Chairman of the Board of 
Assessors. 

He has served as Appraiser of Estates 
for the Probate Courts of Farmington and 
Bristol ; has also served as Appraiser in 



foreclosure proceedings for the different 
saving banks in this vicinit}, and was 
appointed Chairman of the Commission 
bv the Superior Court to adjust the land 
damages between the Bristol Water Com- 
pany and parties owning land in Bristol, 
Plymouth, etc. He was connected with 
the Standard Rule Co., and was a director 
in several corporations in Unionville. 

He was a member in the Legislature ot 
'"j^, and served on the committee for the 
new Capitol Building. 

He is a strong and active Democrat. 




DAVID W. WILLIAMS 



David W. Wilmaais, of Glastonbury, was 
born in the town which he now represents on 
April 12, 1853. His school life differed but 
little from that of many New England boys, 
attending the district school and academy, and 
in 1873 entered the Scientific Department of 
Yale College, where he remained three years, 
ill health compelling him to leave. Since 1876 
he has been associated with his father's firm, 
the J. B. Williams Co., one of the largest and 
oldest manufacturers of shaving soaps in the 
world, being at present vice-president and 
superintendent of that company. 

Mr. Williams has always been a strong Re- 
publican, and has held the office of President 
of the Glastonbury Republican Club for six 
years past. He was a member of the House in 
1893, serving on the Committee on Education. 

The name Williams is an old one, probablv 



of Welsh origin, though the first of this family 
to emigrate to this country was Robert Will- 
iams, of Norwich, England, who settled in 
Roxbury, Mass., and was made a freeman in 
1638. From this the line comes down through 
Capt. Isaac Williams, who settled in Newton, 
Mass. William Williams, of Lebanon, was a 
member of the Continental Congress, and as 
such signed the Declaration of Independence. 
Rev. Elisha Williams was for thirteen years 
president of Yale College. 

The family history forms one of the most in- 
teresting in New England. The old home- 
stead in Lebanon, built in 17 10, is still stand- 
ing and in good repair. 

It is one of the noted homes in that old his- 
toric town. James Baker Williams, father of 
the subject of this sketch, is still living and 
active in business. 



I 




CLINTON L. LOVELAND 



Clinton L. Loveland, of Glastonbury, 
was born in the town he represents Nov. 
23, 1847, ^iid is therefore 47 years of age. 
He attended the public schools and fin- 
ished his education at the Wilbraham 



Academ}-. In 1891 and 1892 he was a 
member of the Board of Relief. His 
business is paper making and farming, 
in both of which he has been ver}^ success- 
ful. He is a Republican. 



/ 



^•p^ 




( 




WILLIAM COATES CHENEY 



William Coates Cheney, of Manches- 
ter, one of the young'est members of the 
House, having been born at South Man- 
chester December 3, 1864. He received a 
High School education. He is an active 
RepubHcan and member of the Town Com- 
mittee. He is also popular in military 
circles, having served an enlistment in 



Company K, First Regiment, C. N. G., 
also as Paymaster of that regiment, 
and at i;)resent is Inspector of Small 
Arms Practice on the staff of Colonel 
Burdette. 

In business Mr. Cheney is associated 
with the silk manufacturing firm of Cheney 
Bros., of South Manchester. 



M 




FRANCIS H. VVHITON 



Francis H. Whiton, ot Manchester, is 
a physician ; was born in Mansfield, Conn., 
May i6, 1846. He was educated at the 
public schools and by private tutors. He 
taught school six years. After attending 
the Harvard Medical School for two years 
he spent a year at the Dartmouth Medical 
College, where he graduated November i, 
1871. He practiced in a New York Hos- 
pital for two years and then went to Man- 
chester in November, 1873, where he has 



been in active practice ever since, except 
last year, when he went abroad. He was 
a member of the Board of Education in 
Mansfield, and is Chairman of the Board 
of Health in Manchester. 

On May 17. 1876, Dr. Whiton married 
Mary Elizabeth, only daughter of Geo. W. 
Loomis, of Portsmouth, N. H. 

A gentleman of fine social qualities, and 
standing high in his profession. Dr. Whiton 
is universally esteemed and admired. 




HIRAM E. HODGE 



Htram E. Hodge, of Marlboro, one of 
the Democratic members, is a native of 
Glastonbury, and forty-three years of age. 
He received a common-school education, 
and is engaged in farming, though he was 
formerly a stone mason. Mr. Hodge holds 



the office of Second Selectman, and was 
Town Auditor in 1892 and '93. 

He moved from Glastonbury, where 
the name of Hodge is an old and well- 
known one, to Chatham, and thence to 
Marlboro, about seven years. 




WM. G. KINLOCK 



Wm. G. Kinlock, of New Britain, is 
fifty-eight years old and a native of New 
York City, his parents having emigrated 
to that city from Scotland. 

He received a common-school education. 
In the war he was a Sergeant in the First 
Conn. Volunteers, afterward Lieutenant 



of Co. G, Sixth Connecticut Volunteers. 
Mr. Kinlock has been connected with 
the Stanley Rule and Level Co. since 1853, 
and is a contractor and rule maker. 

Though always deeply interested in 
local and State politics, Mr. Kinlock has 
never been a seeker after office. 



8r 




FRANK E. HOLMES 



Frank E. Holmes, of Rocky Hill, was 
born in that town, July 7, 1861. He was 
educated in the district common school. 
Mr. Holmes has held for some time, and 
now holds, the office of Registrar of Votes 
and Constable, and is a member of the Town 



Committee, also being a member on joint 
rules in the House of Representatives. In 
business life Mr. Holmes is connected with 
Maltbv. Henle)' & Co., manufacturers of 
hollow ware and hardware at Rockv Hill. 
He is a very loyal Republican. 




EDWARD HAMILTON BROCKETT 



Edward Hamilton Brockett, of Sims- 
bury, son of James and Evelyn Brockett, 
who represented the town of Simsbury in 
1 87 1, was born in Sirasbur}- June 9, 1854. 
He is a descendant of one of the first 
settlers of that place who came over from 
England prior to 1643. Three of his ances- 
tors served in the Revolutionary War. 
He was educated in the common and select 
schools. Since i8go has been a director 



in the Avon Creamer}- Companv. For two 
years, 1891 and 1892, he was Chairman of 
the Board of Relief, and is at present a 
member of the Board. Mr. Brockett is a 
successful farmer and a staunch Republi- 
can, and received the largest vote and 
majority ever cast in his town for Repre- 
sentative. He has recently been elected 
Treasurer of Advance Grange, No. 22, 
Patrons of Husbandry, for three years. 



89 




CHARLES HULL CLARK 



Charles Hull Clark, of Southington, 
was born in that town October 23, 1832; 
was educated in the common schools and 
at Lewis' Academy in Southington. 

In 1854, in company with his two older 
brothers, he engaged in the manufacture 
of bolts and carriage hardware under the 
firm name of Wm. J. Clark & Co., located 
in Southington, District of Milldale, and 
was superintendent of the factory until 
1862, when he enlisted in the Twentieth 
Connecticut Volunteers, serving until the 
fall of '64 ; during the last year of service 
was Lieutenant on staff of Colonel James 
Wood, who commanded the Third Bri- 
gade, Third Division, Twentieth Army 



Corps, in front of Atlanta. On his return 
home he again resumed active duty at 
the factory of Wm. J. Clark & Co., when 
in 1 87 1 the name of the firm was changed, 
by the retirement of Wm. J. Clark, to 
Clark Bros. & Co., by which the manufac- 
tory is known at the present time, Mr. 
Clark continuing to superintend the works 
until 1882. 

For several years he has been frequently 
elected on the Board of Assessors and of 
Relief in his town, and at present is a di- 
rector in both the Southington National 
and the Southington Savings Banks. 

In politics he has always been an en- 
thusiastic Republican. 



90 




PHILIP VVADSWORTH 



Philip Wadsworth, of Suffield, while 
much of his business life has been in Illi- 
nois, is a native of New Hartford and a son 
of Tertius Wadsworth, who came to Hart- 
ford many years ago, and who lived on 
Pearl street, near Main, and died in 1872. 
Mr. Wadsworth's early education was in 
private schools in Hartford. He attended 
Williston Seminary two years and the 
Connecticut Literary Institution one year. 
He went to Chicago, where for many years 
he was a merchant. He was first Assessor 
of Internal Revenue for the First District 
of Illinois under President Lincoln, and 
Collector of Internal Revenue for the same 
district under President Grant. He was 
also appointed b)' the Legislature of Illi- 



nois one of the Commissioners for build- 
ing the new State House at Springfield, 
111., in the early sixties. At one time he 
was General Superintendent of the Chi- 
cago, Evanston and Lake Superior Rail- 
road, afterwards consolidated with the 
Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul. After 
retiring from business in Chicago he went 
to Suffield and settled in 1889. He is 60 
years old and a Republican. 

Mr. Wadsworth is a prominent and act- 
ive member of the House and a member 
of the Cities and Boroughs Committee, 
which has many important matters be- 
fore it. He is also Chairman of the 
Committee on the Putnam Memorial. 
Camp. 



91 




DWTGHT S. FULLER 



DwiGHT S. Fuller, of Suffield, is a na- 
tive of Suffield, 57 years of age, a son of 
the late Joseph Fuller, who was largely 
known in insurance and other business 
circles, and a brother of Dr. Fuller, of 
Hartford. He was educated in the public 
schools and the Connecticut Literar}' In- 
stitution. He is a nnember of the First 
Congregational Church, also of the choir, 
with which he has been identified formore 
than forty years. He is one of Suffield's 



prosperous men and prominent in many 
local affairs, owning a large farm and 
carrying on an extensive business in buy- 
ing and packing tobacco. He is a director 
in the Towne-Fuller Co., of Westfield, one 
of the largest cigar manufacturing concerns 
in Western Massachusetts ; is also a di- 
rector in the Suffield Public Library. He 
has always acted with the Republicans and 
is a member of the Committee on Humane 
Institutions in the present Legislature. 



92 



I 




ADOLPH C. STERNBERG 



Adolph C. Sternberg, ol" West Hart- 
ford, was born in Germany, August 5, 
1839, came to this country in early child- 
hood, and received an academic education 
in this country. His father was a lawyer 
in Germany and left his home and pro- 
fession to enjoy the privileges of our free 
institutions. Mr. Sternberg is one of West 
Hartford's active business men, a farmer, 
fruit grower, tobacco packer and dealer in 
agricultural implements. He is an Acting 
School Visitor, Justice of the Peace, Peach 
Yellows Commissioner and President of 
the Village Improvement Society. Mr. 
Sternberg is greatly interested in the sub- 



ject of good roads, having initiated the 
comprehensive road improvements in 
West Hartford, investing $60,000 in mac- 
adamizing its principal thoroughfares, 
and is now Chairman of Committee on 
Roads and Bridges. He has been invited 
by several towns in the State to speak 
on the subject of good roads and has 
had the satisfaction of seeing many im- 
provements in roadmaking as a conse- 
quence. He is an active member and 
Treasurer of the West Hartford Congre- 
gational Church. Five of his brothers 
served in the Union army. He is always 
a Republican. 




\ 



CHARLES T. WELCH 



Charles T. Welch, of Windsor, was 
born in the town ol Windsor, Conn., April 
6, 1858, and received a common-school 
education ; at the age of twenty-one he 
entered the employ of Mr. D. W. Phelps, 
a leading merchant of Windsor, as Assis- 
tant Postmaster and Bookkeeper. 

In 1885 ^is accepted a position with The 
American Writing Machine Company-, 
manufacturers of the Caligraph Type- 
writer, as Paymaster and clerk, which 
position he has held ever since. He was 
also at one time a member of the firm of 
Clark & Welch, grocery dealers in Wind- 
sor ; was Agent of Adams Express Com- 



pany, and is a prominent Mason, being an 
officer in Washington Lodge, No. 70, A. 
F. and A. M. 

Mr. Welch has always voted the straight 
Republican ticket, and at the last election 
received the largest majority ever polled in 
the town. 

He has always been a resident ot 
Windsor, as were his ancestors for the 
last two hundred and fifty years. His 
great grandfather served in the Revolu- 
tionar}'^ War, and his grandfather in the 
war of 1812. His father represented the 
town in the Legislature of 1857, and his 
brother, E. A. Welch, in 1889. 



d4 




JOHN A. DUBON 



John A. DuBox, of Windsor, was born of 
German parents in New York City, March 19, 
1844, and received his education in the public 
schools. When the war broke out he enlisted 
as a private in the Third New York Light Ar- 
tillery, and is now an active member of Con- 
verse Post, No. 67, G. A. R. , of Windsor 
Locks. His early life was spent on a farm and, 
on removing to Windsor, twenty-two years ago, 
he engaged as a farm hand. To become the 
possessor of an interest in the soil was the great 
dream of his life, and with his untiring energy, 
industry, and perseverance it took him but a 
few years to become the owner of a small farm. 
By his thrift and economy he was enabled, 
some years afterward, to add to his posses- 
sions, so that he now owns one of the most 
substantial farm properties in the town of 
Windsor. From the first he made a specialty 
in improving the quality of leaf tobacco, and 
with such success that his product not alone 
commands high prices, but that when the Con- 



necticut Tobacco Experiment Company was 
formed he was chosen as one of its executive 
committee and superintendent of the experi- 
ments, positions which he still holds. In the 
present General Assembly his ability and effi- 
ciency was recognized in being chosen from 
among twenty farmers in Hartford County to 
serve on the important Committee on Agricul- 
ture. Though not possessed of a collegiate or 
academic education, he has always taken a 
lively interest in the educational matters of his 
town ; has been one of the strongest advocates 
for the establishment of its high schools, and 
has for many years acted as school committee. 
He has also served on the board of relief for 
several terms to the satisfaction of his fellow- 
citizens. Mr. DuBon is now in independent 
circumstances, but his prosperity can in no 
way be attributed to any element of luck, but 
to hard work, fidelity to principle, and strict 
integrity. In politics he is a stalwart Republi- 
can. 



95 







CHARLES W. HOLBROOK 



More than two hundred years ago a 
Holbrook came over from Derby, Eng- 
land, and settled at Milford, Conn. Later 
Derby, Conn., was named bv them, and 
there they lived until earl}- in the present 
century. A hundred years ago Col. Hol- 
brook married a daughter of Parson Swift. 
Their son Josiah was a good deal of an 
enthusiast, and did much for the cause of 
common schools. He moved to Ohio 
about 1840, and settled in Berea, where 
his son Dwight married, and there 



Charles W., the subject of this sketch, now 
Representative from Windsor Locks, was 
born. 

Mr. Holbrook, therefore, comes from 
good, solid stock, and is known as a man 
of sound, hard sense, well-fitted to care for 
the interests of his town in the Legislature. 
He has been described as " one of the 
forty-six immortals who were plucked as 
brands from the burning in the political 
conflagration of 1894," which means that 
he is lo)'al to the Democratic party. 



96 



Howard L. Sanborn was born in Collinsville, Sep- 
tember 30, 1855, and attended the graded school in that 
place till seventeen years of age. He has been town 
clerk since 1886 and tax collector since 1893. While a 
tinsmith by trade, he has since 1885 been engaged in 
the lumber business and general building. In politics 
he is a Republican. 

George Edmund Bidwell is a native of Canton 
Centre thirty-five years old. He completed his educa- 
tion at the Connecticut Literary Institution at Suffield 
and at Hannum's Business College. His business is 
farming. He is a Republican. 

Franklin H. Mayberry was born in Casco, Maine, 
thirty-five years ago. He graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Vermont in 1885 and adopted the profession of 
a physician. Besides his successful practice in East 
Hartford he is health officer and examiner for several 
life insurance companies, including the Equitable and 
jEtna. He is active in school matters, a member of 
the High School Committee and acting school visitor. 

George Wylie Miller was born in Paisley, Scot- 
land, fifty-three years ago. He attended the common 
schools till twelve years of age. By trade he is a 
machinist and in politics a Democrat. 

John MiDOLEiONwas amember of the Legislature of 
1883-4 and is one of Enfield's prominent and much 
esteemed men. He is a self-made man, born in County 
Sligo, Ireland, and is thirty-three years old. Receiving 
an education in the schools of Ireland, he was a short 
time at Dublin University, but he left it to come to this 
country. He has been a resident of Enfield for many 
years; here he has been justice of the peace, a member 
of the board of relief. He has a large farm, and also 
deals in lumber and is a large contractor. He also 
owns a general merchandise store. He is a Republican 
and a director in the Connecticut Central Railroad. 

Jesse W. Ruick is a native of Granby, forty years 
old, a graduate of the Wilbraham Academy. He is a 
farmer and has been an assessor of Granby for ten 
years. An active Republican, he will always act with 
his party on party questions. 

Columbus Reed is engaged in a mercantile and 
farming business. He was born in West Granby, 
fifty-six years ago, where he received a common school 
education. He has been on the School Committee and 
was selectman of Granby for three years. He is a 
Republican. 

Carlton E. Osborn was born in New Hartland, 
February 12, 1867, and is therefore one of the younger 
members of the House. He is a graduate of Wesleyan 
Academy at Wilbraham, and is a farmer by occupation 
and a Democrat in politics. 

John H. Wheeler was born in Delaware County, 
N. Y., September 14, 1855. He is a Republican and 
has served three terms as a selectman. He is engaged 

in farming. 



George T. Finch was born in Pcnn Yan, N. Y., 
June 28, 1854. He graduated from Hobart College, 
Geneva, in 1875, and became a physician. He has 
been active in school matters and has been acting 
school visitor for about twelve years. He is an active 
Republican. 

Andrew Turnbull was born in Paisley, Scotland, 
sixty-two years ago, landed in this country in 1840 
and has always been a Republican. He received a 
common school education and became a scale maker. 
He is now a pattern maker. Twice he has been a 
member of the New Britain Common Council. 

Arlan Pratt Francis is a Newington man by birth, 
and is now thirty-six years old. He is a graduate of 
the Hartford High School, class of 1877. He has held 
the office of collector of taxes in his town and is at 
present an assessor. His business is farming and his 
politics thoroughly Republican. 

Willis J. Hemingway was born in Plymouth, Conn., 
October 16, 1854, and was educated in the common 
schools. He is a merchant and holds the office of tax 
collector, having been recently elected for another 
year. He has been a member of the board of fire com- 
missioners for many years, and of the Republican 
Town Committee for several years, 

Samuel Whitehead, Republican, is a native of 
Simsbury and will be fifty-one years old January 8. 
He was educated in the common schools, and for thirty 
years has been an engineer and machinist. He is now 
an assessor in his town and has been for the past four 
years. 

Levi Eugene Southworth was born in Ravenna, 
Ohio, thirty-seven years ago and educated in the com- 
mon schools. He is a druggist and secretary and 
general manager of the Southington and Plantsville 
Tramway Company. In politics he is a Republican. 

Ransom M. Burnham was born in Hartford and is 
forty-five years old. He received a common school 
education. He has an extensive business in mining, 
stock raising and farming, and for some time has been 
constable and tax collector for his town. He is a 
Republican. 

Elizur S. Goodrich is a native of Wethersfield, and 
is fifty-nine years of age. He was educated in the dis- 
trict and high schools of Wethersfield and at Williston 
Seminary, Easthampton, Mass. Mr. Goodrich has 
never before held political office, but for a long time 
has been president of the Hartford Street Railway 
Company and its active manager. He is well-known 
among the street railway men of the country. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

Francis H. Robbins is a native of Wethersfield and 
is fifty-one years of age. He was educated by a private 
tutor and received a further education at the high 
school. He has held the office of assessor in his town 
since 1884, and has been a member of the board of 
relief. He is engaged in farming and is a Republican. 



97 





HENRY GLEASON NEWTON 



Henry Gleason Newton, of New 
Haven, was born at Durham, Jiine 5, 
1843. He received his education at the 
Quarry School, the Durham Academy, 
Wesleyan University and the Yale Law 
School, to which should be added the 
Durham Lyceum and Dwight Union De- 
bating Club. He graduated from Wes- 
leyan in 1870, and from the Law School in 
1872. 

Mr. Newton was a farmer until twenty- 
four years of age. Since 1872 he has prac- 
ticed law in New Haven with much suc- 
cess. He has been a regular attendant at 
church both in his youth and in his riper 
years. He has voted at every election 
since he was of age, and has faithfully at- 
tended all town meetings, school meetings 



and caucuses. He has favored measures 
for the advancement of education and 
temperance. He was Acting School 
Visitor in Durham for ten years, and is a 
director in various corporations. 

In 1885 Mr. Newton was a member of 
the House of Representatives from Dur- 
ham and became House Chairman of the 
Judiciary Committee, in which capacity 
he did good and effective work. He is 
this year a member of the House from New 
Haven, and House Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Humane Institutions, in which 
capacity he will endeavor to carry into 
effect the recommendations of the State 
Board of Charities. He is a Republican 
because he believes in the party's prin- 
ciples. 



98 




LEWIS ELLIOTT 



Lewis Elliott is a business man who 
has been very intimately connected with 
the rubber trade. He had his first expe- 
rience in that Hne in 1850. He was born 
in Portsmouth, November 17, 1823. He 
received a common -school education. For 
forty-three years, until December, 1890, he 



was Superintendent of L. Candee & Co., 
rubber boot and shoe manufacturers. He 
has served as a Fire Commissioner in New 
Haven for sixteen years, and has been a 
member of the Common Council. He says 
he is a " Republican always." He is a mem- 
ber of the Committee on Manufactures. 



99 




GEORGE H. COWELL 



George H. Cowell, of Waterbury, is a 
lawyer. He was fitted for college at the 
Waterbury High School and at Wesleyan Acad- 
emy, Wilbraham, Mass. He graduated from 
Yale in 1868 and the Columbia Law School 
in 1869. He was born in the city that he now 
represents in the Legislature, March 25, 1840. 
He was First Lieutenant of Company A, Second 
Regiment, C. N. G. , 1870 to 1875. J^dg*^ 
Cowell has had much legislative experience, 
having been Assistant Clerk of the House in 
1871, Clerk in 1872 and Clerk of the Senate in 
1873. He was Chief Clerk of the Post Office 
Department at Washington 1875-76. Judge 
Cowell gets his title from having been Judge 
of the Police and District Courts of Waterbury. 
He will be a leading participant in the debates 
of the House. He was for four years an Alder- 
man and has held numerous local offices. 
Judge Cowell is a director in the West Side 



Savings Bank and the Watertown Savings 
Bank. 

He is a great believer in fraternity exempli- 
fied by benevolent secret societies. He was 
Grand Master of Connecticut Odd Fellows in 
1 89 1, and was largely instrumental in estab- 
lishing the Odd Fellows' Home in Groton, con- 
tributing the first $500 for its purchase. He 
has been a member of the Supreme Lodge of 
three of the fraternal orders and at the head of 
the subordinate and Grand Lodges of some of 
the others. Judge Cowell is at present a 
member of Knights Templar, Odd Fellows, 
Knights of Pythias, Red Men, Good Fellows, 
Heptasophs, Royal Arcanum, and Sons of the 
American Revolution. 

As an active Republican he was for six years 
Chairman of the Waterbury Town Committee, 
and for four years on the State Central Com- 
mittee. 



100 




WARREN L. HALL 



Warren L. Hall, of Waterbury, was born 
in the town of Cheshire, Conn., May 21st, 
1856. He received a good High School educa- 
tion, and at twenty-one entered the mercan- 
tile house of the late Henry J. Johnson, of 
Hartford, as traveling salesman, making many 
friends, and building up a first-class reputation. 

After five years of successful business with 
this house, Mr. Hall engaged in the wholesale 
produce and fruit business in New York, con- 
tinuing therein until 1886, when he established 
in Waterbury the first wholesale grocery and 
produce house of that city. 

This business Mr. Hall still carries on, giv- 
ing employment to a large force. 

On December i6th, 1881, Mr. Hall was mar- 
ried to Miss Esther L. Andrew, daughter of 
Mr. S. W. Andrew, of Naugatuck, Conn. Two 



children, Lamont Andrew, and Beatrice Amelia, 
have come to brighten their home. 

Mr. Hall is largely interested in building and 
loan associations, and is a trustee of the Co- 
operative Savings Society of Hartford, also 
president of the local board at Waterbury, of 
the Co-operative Building Bank of New York. 

He is Vice-President of the Waterbury Board 
of Trade, and was Secretary of the Board dur- 
ing 1894. 

Mr. Hall served the city of Waterbury as 
Councilman in 1894, and was re-elected to the 
same office for the present year. 

He is an ardent Republican, but not a 
politician, being fearless of offending rings 
or floating politicians, always ready to pro- 
mote the best legislation irrespective of party 
lines. 



101 




REUBEN H. TUCKER 



Reibex H. Tl'CKER, of Ansonia, has 
had man)- honors. He was Warden of the 
Borough of Ansonia for six terms. Town 
Clerk of Derby and Ansonia ten Aears, Jus- 
tice of the Peace for twelve years, and is at 
present one of the Assessors of the city of 
Ansonia. He has been School and Borough 
Collector, served one year as a Burgess, 
and two as Borough Clerk. He has been 
a public official for the past eleven years 
continuously. A man ot such experience 
will doubtless take easily to the duties that 
will fall upon him as a member of the Leg- 
islature. He is a Republican and a 
" staunch " one. Ansonia, that now honors 
him by intrusting its affairs to his repre- 
sentation in the House, is his birthplace. 
He was born in August, 1847, his being 



the first recorded male birth in the town 
after it was named by its founder, Anson 
G. Phelps, for whom it was named. He 
was educated at the common schools, but 
had the additional advantage of a com- 
mercial course. The Masonic fraternity, 
like his native town, has conferred upon 
him many honors. He has received all the 
degrees up to and including the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite. His 
lodge, chapter and council have in turn 
honored him with the highest honors in 
their gift, and he has occupied all of the 
offices in the gift of the Grand Chapter of 
this State, and is a member of the General 
Grand Chapter of the United States, and 
is now one of the council officers in the 
Grand Council of the State of Connecticut. 



102 




ExMERY L. TERRELL 



Emery L. Terrell, of Beacon Falls, is 
in the grocery and general merchandise 
business, and has followed that occupation 
for several years, being a clerk in the store 
of E. J. Terrell. He is 28 years old, hav- 
ing been born May g, 1866, at Colebrook. 
He had the advantage of a High School 
course. He is now Tax Collector, and 
served as Town Clerk and Town Treasurer 



of Beacon Falls in 1889 ^"^ 1890, being a 
member of the Board of Relief in 1894. 
He was appointed Tax Collector in 1889, 
and was also elected for the same office in 
1893 and 1894. He is a Democrat, and 
known as a young man witli sound ideas 
and progressive. Mr. Terrell is one 
ol the youngest men on the floor ot the 
House. 



103 




HARRY FRENCH FECK 



Harry French I^kck, of Bethany, has 
the honor of representing^ his town' as the 
first and only RepubUcan elected since 
the town was incorporated, sixty-two 
years ago, receiving over two votes to 
his opponent's one. He was born in Beth- 
any August 5th, 1843, 'U'ld was educated 
in the common schools. 

For ten years he has been chairman of 
the Fund Committee, as long a time a 
member of the Congregational wSociety of 
Bethany. He has also been Town Audi- 
tor, and a member of the Board of Relief. 
Mr. Peck is an Assessor and Selectman. 

Mr. Peck followed farming during his 
early life, on his father's farm, also doing 



the rei)airing of farming utensils with 
much success. 

Finding he was peculiarly adapted to 
this line of work, he opened a shop for 
himself in 1880, and contracted for all 
kinds of repairs to farming implements, 
besides conducting a department devoted 
to shoeing horses and oxen. So favorably 
known did his shoeing become, that fre- 
quently oxen were sent ten miles over the 
hills to his shop. 

Mr. Peck also owns a farm of 285 acres, 
which he personally manages, selling 
therefrom milk and hogs, vegetables and 
apples. He has always been a staunch 
Republican. 



104 




EDWARDS D. SHELDON 



Edwards D. Sheldon, of Branford, was 
born in the town that is now honorinj^ him 
and itself, April i8, 1843. He received a 
public school and academic education. 
When the war broke out his family could 
not restrain his ardor to fight for his coun- 
try, and he served faithfully as a private in 
Company B, Twenty-seventh Connecticut 



Volunteers. In 1870 he, with his brother, 
George L., succeeded their father at 
the well-known and favorite summer re- 
sort at Pine Orchard, on Long Island 
Sound. Mr. Sheldon is popularly known 
by the traveling public as one of the jolliest 
ot bonifaces. 

He is an active Republican. 



105 




JACOB D. WALTER 



Jacob D. Walter, who represents the 
town of Cheshire in the Legislature for 
the hrst time, was born in Hamden thirty- 
eight 3'ears ago. He lived in Kansas and 
New York from 1857 to 1879. -'^ince tak- 
ing up his residence in Cheshire he has 
been active in the Republican party- He 



was a merchant for several years, but at 
present is engaged in farming. Mr. Wal- 
ter has been Assessor for two years, and 
held other offices of trust in his town. 
His education w'as received at the public 
schools and at John E. Lovell's, New 
Haven. He is a County Commissioner. 



100 




SANFORD E. CHAFFEE 



Sanford E. Chaffee, of Derby, was 
born in East Windsor, October 14, I1S34. 
He has been a resident of Derby for about 
fifty years. He came of a Democratic 
family, but has been a Republican ever 
since the formation of the party. He was 
an officer in the Twentieth Connecticut 
Volunteers. After the war he remained in 
Virginia until 1872. While there he held 
various offices under the United States 
Government. He was Superintendent of 



Registration and Election under the Re- 
construction Acts in 1872. He returned to 
Derby, and has been in the employ of the 
New York, New Haven and Hartford 
Railroad Company since that time as sta- 
tion agent. He was elected to the House of 
Representatives in 1887, and was a member 
of the Military Committee and Chairman 
of the House Committee on Constitutional 
Amendments. He was married March 16, 
1887. to Hattie D. Russell, of New Haven. 



107 




H. HOLTON WOOD 



H. HoLTOX Wood, of Derby, was born 
in Montreal, Canada, in 1859. He received 
a liberal education, and was graduated 
Irom McGill University in that city in 
1879. He is President of the Derby 
Street Railway Compan}-, the first electric 
railway started in New England, of the 
Home Trust Company, the Derby and 
Shelton Board of Trade, and the Con- 



necticut Street Railwa}- Association, as 
well as a director in several business cor- 
porations in Derby. Previous to his elec- 
tion as Representative he had held none 
but local offices, such as being a member 
of the boards of burgesses and education. 
He is a Democrat, and was on the staft 
of Governor Morris, with the rank of 
Colonel. 



108 






CHARLES W. GRANNISS 



Charles W. Granniss, of East Haven, 
was born in Foxon, in the town of East 
Haven, November lo, 1844. He has passed 
most of his life on the place where he was 
born and now lives, which has been in 
possession of his direct ancestors since the 
first settlement of New Haven Colony. 

He is a son of the Revolution, his g-rand- 
father having been one of those who fol- 
lowed Putnam to Boston after Concord 
and Lexington. 

The subject of this sketch left school 
before he was sixteen years of age, and 



enlisted in Compan}' "A," Tenth Connec- 
ticut Infantry, where he served four 
years. 

He was twice wounded in action, and 
was promoted to sergeant. He is a member 
of the Board of Education of his town, 
and is a farmer. Mr. Granniss is a stead- 
fast Republican. Mr. Granniss is par- 
ticularly enthusiastic as an old soldier, and 
he will be a leader in all aims that are for 
the advancement and comfort of the class 
that deserves all the gratitude that can be 
offered. 



109 




BENJAMIN PAGE 



Benjamin Page, of Meriden, is a native of 
North Branford, where he was born fifty-four 
years ago. The influence of his early training 
and environment has been prominent in shap- 
ing his character and career. As many of the 
men who are prominent in public affairs to- 
day, noted no less for their integrity than for 
their ability, were born and brought up among 
the sturdy farmers of New England, so the 
subject of this sketch was born, and so was 
laid the foundation of an upright and useful 
life. 

When Mr. Page was about twenty-four years 
of age he came to Meriden, where he has since 
made his home and enjoyed the fullest confi- 
dence and esteem of his fellow-citizens regard- 
less of party affiliations. During the first four 
years of his residence in Meriden he had 
charge of the South Meriden public school, 
and among his pupils were many of Meriden's 
successful men and women. Mr. Page's busi- 
ness is insurance and real estate, and the keen 
business intuition and sterling integrity that 
have made that business a success have been 
no less conspicuous in his career as a public 
man. For ten consecutive years he was city 
and town tax collector. He was next elected 
from his ward to the court of common council 
where he was the Republican leader and an 
efficient member of the city government. 

During the last two years that he was a 
member of the council he was president pro 
tern, of that body and acting mayor of the city. 
In 1889 he was the Republican candidate for 



mayor and was elected. He was reelected in 
1890, but positively declined another renomi- 
nation in 1891 though great pressure was 
brought to bear on him to induce him to accept. 
Under his administration important public im- 
provements were begun and successfully com- 
pleted, notably the addition to the Meriden 
water system. The Meriden sewerage S3'stem 
was also started while Mr. Page was mayor. 
When the Republicans of Meriden, in the fall 
of 1894, were looking about for a candidate 
for representative, the name of Benjamin Page 
was suggested by his many friends. He was 
nominated unanimously by the largest caucus 
ever held in Meriden, and, with his colleague, 
Mr. Morrill, was triumphantly elected. He 
served in the Legislature as a member of the 
Committee on Insurance, of which he was 
clerk. 

Mr. Page is a very conservative man and 
uses his thorough knowledge of public affairs 
to the best advantage, and his advice is fre- 
quently sought in public as well as private 
business matters. Mr. Page is an active mem- 
ber and official of St. Andrew's Episcopal 
Church and one of the trustees of the well- 
known Curtis Home, an institution founded 
and endowed by the late Lemuel J. Curtis as a 
home for aged women and orphan children. 
He is also a director of the Meriden Savings 
Bank. Although Mr. Page is an ardent Re- 
publican in politics, he respects the opinions of 
all, and never takes an unfair advantage of a 
political opponent. 



no 




JACOB STEWART MORRILL 



Jacob Stewart Morrill, of Meriden, 
is of New Hampshire birth, being born at 
Somersworth, April i, 1839. His ances- 
tors were among the earh^ settlers of this 
country, and came from England to Salem, 
Mass., about 1630. His grandfather was 
an officer in the Revolutionar}' War. 

Mr. Morrill has had an eventful lite. He 
attended the grammar and high schools of 
the town of Great Falls, now called Som- 
ersworth. He went to sea at the age of 
fifteen years, and was rapidly promoted 



until he was master of a ship when 
he was twenty-iour 3'ears of age. He 
gave up the sea in 1867; since 1868 the 
business that he has generally pursued has 
been that of engraving. He came to Mer- 
iden, Conn., from Springfield, Mass., about 
1871, and has lived there since, gaining 
every year new influence and new respect 
from his fcll(,nv-mcn. He has been a 
Republican since the birth of the part}*, 
and cast his first ballot tor Abraham Lin- 
coln in 1 860. He has not held office before. 



in 




GEORGE M. GUNN 



George M. Guxx, of Milford, was a 
member of the House in 1 880-81, also in 
1885 and in the last Legislature. He was 
Senator from the Seventh District in the 
sessions of 1882-83, so that his legislative 
experience is extensive and would give 
him the attention of his colleagues on the 
floor if he did not command it bv the more 
substantial fact that he is one of the clev- 
erest politicians in the State, and an orator 



and thinker of ability. He was born in 
Milford, August 10, 1851, and graduated 
from Vale College in the class of '74, and 
from the Law School in '78. He has 
gained distinction in his practice of law in 
Milford and New Haven. He has been 
Judge of Probate in Milford for six years, 
and is President of the Milford Savings 
Bank. He is one of the leading members 
of the bar of the State. 



112 




FREDERICK L. TIBBALS 



Frederick L. Tibhals. of Milford, was born 
thirty-six years ago. His ancestor, Thomas 
Tibbals, was engaged in the Pequot War under 
Capt. John Mason, in 1637, was impressed 
with the Wepawaug River and led the original 
settlers, under Rev. Peter Pruden. in 1639 to 
Milford. In recognition of which in the origi- 
nal lay-out of the town he was granted a special 
plot of fifty acres, and at the 250th anniversary 
of the settlement and building of the Memorial 
Bridge special distinction was shown the two 
men by immense boulders at each end of the 
Bridge, one to Thomas Tibbals, the first set- 
tler, and one to Peter Pruden, the first minister. 
Mr. Tibbals is a graduate of Milford High 
School and the Yale Business College, of New 
Haven. 

He is one of the most aggressive and popular 
young men in the town which he represents. 
A Republican by inheritance as well as convic- 
tion, he has done much for a period of years 



toward changing the political aspect of the 
town, and is the second Republican representa- 
tive that Milford has sent to the Assembly for 
the past thirty years. 

He is well and favorably known in New 
Haven as well as in his native town, having 
been for a number of years engaged in a suc- 
cessful business as secretary and treasurer of 
the George H. Ford Company, New Haven. 
He is a director in the Milford Savings Bank, 
has been president of the Republican League, 
is a member of the New Haven Chamber of 
Commerce and the Republican League, also of 
the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of 
Connecticut. 

Remembering that he resides in the town of 
Milford, and that his business interests are in 
the City of New Haven, his selection as a mem- 
ber of the Committee on Cities and Boroughs 
(of which he was elected clerk) is exceedingly 
appropriate. 



113 




WM. H. McCarthy 



William II. McCarthy, of Xaugatuck, 
was born in Ireland in 1854, and is there- 
fore tortv-two \cars old. He came to 
Naus^atuck when only three 3-ears of age 
and has since resided there, receiving a 
common-school education in that town. 

Mr. McCarthy is a staunch Democrat, 
and has been on the Democratic Town 
Committee for eight years. 



He has served as Grand Juror and Jus 
tice of the Peace, also representing his 
town in the Legislature 1891 and 1893. In 
business life Mr. McCarthy is a dealer in 
real estate. 

He is a member of Ojeda Council. 
Knights of Columbus, and of the Ancient 
Order of Foresters of America, having 
been identified with the latter since 1875. 



114 




JOSIAH JAMES LINSLEY 



JosiAii James Linsley, of North Bran- 
ford, comes of a family that was among 
the first to settle in New J^Iaven colony. 
They have resided in this section of the 
country ever since. His grandfather (also 
named Josiah James Linsley) served several 
terms in the Legislature. It is particularly 
fitting that a man of such stock should be 
elected as a member of the State Legisla- 



ture. He was born in New York City in 
1850. He left school when he was quite 
young to take a position as clerk in a 
merchandise broker's ofifice. Most of his 
business life he has been a sugar broker. 
He has prospered in a business way, and 
is known as a clear thinker and a man of 
great executive ability. He is a Republi- 
can. 



115 






'i4pH^, 



s 




ROBERT ORVILLE EATON 



Robert Orville Eaton, of North 
Haven, is one of the best known Reinibli- 
cans in the State, acquiring poHtical dis- 
tinction as a good organizer and faithful 
worker, being among the earhest to assist 
in organizing ^oung Republican clubs. 
For four years he was President of the 
North Haven Club, which was organized 
soon after the New Haven, and is now a 
member of the Executive Committee of the 
" League " for the Seventh Senatorial Dis- 
trict. For two terms he was President of the 
local Literary Society, and for two years 
Master of North Haven Grange. Besides 
these he is a member of three other secret 
organizations, and a director in the local 
Village Improvement Society. He served 



as xAssistant Dairy Commissioner for three 
years from May i, 1891. Since he was 21 
years old he has served upon the Town 
Committee, and since 1888 as Chairman. 
He has filled many other positions of re- 
sponsibility and honor. Mr. Eaton is a 
farmer and market gardener, and is associ- 
ated with his brother Theophilus under the 
name of Eaton Bros., occupying a portion 
of Gov. Eaton's possessions, which has 
never passed from the family name, and 
from which illustrious house Mr. Eaton is 
descended. He was born in North Haven 
in 1857, attended the common schools of 
that town, the Hillhouse High School of 
New Haven, and French's Collegiate 
Institute. 



116 




ELFORD C. RUSSELL 



Elford C. Russell, of Orange, repre- 
sents his native town in the Legislature, 
having been born there December 19, 
1840. 

He attended the common school and the 
old Orange Academy. 

Mr. Russell was engaged in the retail 
meat business from the time of leaving 
school until 1877, and since 1881 has been 
a farmer. In politics he has always voted 
with the Republican party. He is much 
interested in Masonic affairs, and has been 



a member of Annamon Lodge, No. 115, F. 
& A. M., of West Haven, for over twenty 
years, being also a member of Franklin 
Chapter, No. 2, of New Haven. He is on 
the Board of Relief; was formerly a Bur- 
gess of the Borough of West Haven, and 
is a member of Orange Congregational 
Church. Mr. Russell is an earnest tem- 
perance advocate. 

Lieut. Job Sperry, a soldier in the Con- 
tinental Army, was Mr. Russell's paternal 
grandfather. 



IIT 




GEORGE F. SANFORD 



George P. Sanford, of Oxford, was 
born, in the town he now represents in the 
Legislature, in ICS34. He was twenty-five 
years in a store, but now is farming and 
is making a success of it. Mr. Sanford 
is not only a capable man, but he is 
strong in the respect of his fellows. This 
was demonstrated by the very flattering 



vote he got at the election. He is a 
Republican, ardent in his politics, but 
with as many Democratic triends and 
admirers as Republicans. In 1884, 1885 
and 1887 he was an Assessor, and now 
he is on the Board of Relief. He will 
be active in securing agricultural legisla- 
tion. 



lis 



*«v 





GEORGE L. TALMAGE 



George L. Tal^fage, who has been 
elected to represent Prospect hi the House, 
was born in that town, May 22, 1855. He 
got only an ordinary education, but by 
diligence and natural ability he has attained 
no little prominence among his towns- 



people. He is a farmer and believes in the 
principles ot the Republican party. Mr. 
Talmage has served on the Board of Re- 
lief and has held other positions of trust, 
his reputation being founded on a record 
of integrity and energy. 



119 



1 




THEODORE B. BEACH 



Theodore B. Beach, of Seymour, was 
born in the town which he represents in 
the year 1855 ; was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Seymour and Bridgeport. 
His early business was that of clerk in 
a lumber and coal office, after which 
he was employed as a clerk in the Sey- 
mour Railroad office. He was from 1875 
to 1890 Ticket Agent of the Naugatuck 
Railroad and the N. Y. & N. E. R. R., at 
Waterbury, since which time he has been 
Agent for the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., at 
Seymour. He is also connected with the 
S. Y. Beach Paper Company, and is Sec- 
retary of it. He is Treasurer of Citizens' 
Engine Company, No. 2 ; Treasurer of 
Morning Star Lodge, F. and A. M.; 



Treasurer of Nonnawauk Tribe, I. O. R. 
M.; Treasurer, Provident Aid Society ; 
Trustee, Valley Lodge, N. E. O. P.; 
Trustee, Castle Rock Lodge, A. O. U. 
W.; Trustee, Workman's Aid Society ; 
clerk, Seymour Congregational Society. 
These positions of trust he has attained 
by a faithful service for the societies 
with which he has been connected. He 
has been Secretary of the Board of Educa- 
tion since 1883, and Acting School Visitor 
since 1 890. He was foremost in the adoption 
of the free text school book system by his 
town. He is a member of the Town Com- 
mittee, is a Republican, and was elected 
by a majority of 197, the largest ever given 
a Representative here. 



130 




WM. HENRY NEWTON 



Wm. Henry Newton, of Wallincrford, 
Conn., was born June 25, 1850, at New- 
fane, and received his education there and 
at Rev. James Tufts' school at Monson. 
Mass. 

In 1869 Mr. Newton began his business 
life with Winslow & Park, and remained 
there and with their successors, J. D. Hol- 
brook & Co., until 1872. He then moved 
to Middletown, Conn., and became a clerk 
for his brother, C. M. Newton, until 1875, 
when he was appointed to a clerkship in 
the First National Bank. His sterling 
qualities were rewarded in the fall of 1881 
by his present position of cashier of the 
First National Bank of Wallingford. 

Mr. Newton is an ardent Republican, 
and takes an active part in local. State and 
National campaigns. He was elected 
Town Treasurer in 1885; also served as 
Treasurer of the borough in 1889; was 
elected to the court of Burgesses, and the 
following year was made Warden of the 
borough of Wallingford. To this office he 
was re-elected in 1891, 1892, and 1894. 

In 1887 he was appointed Paymaster of 
the 2nd Regiment, C. N. G., by Colonel 
Leavenworth, and served on the latter's 
staff with rank of Second Lieutenant for 
two years, and received a reappointment 
by Colonel Leavenworth's successor, Col. 
John B. Dougherty, and resigned in 1892. 



Mr. Newton is a member ol the First 
Congregational Church, and in social or- 
ganizations he is prominent, being a Past 
Master of Compass Lodge, F. & A. M., 
a member ot Keystone Chapter of Meri- 
den, of the Republican League Club of 
New Haven, and Arcanum Club of Wal- 
lingford. He was married October 13, 
188 1, to Miss Alice Dickenson, daughter of 
Dana D. and Eliza A. Dickenson, of Will- 
iamsville. They had two children, Elsie 
M. and Mabel S. (deceased). Mr. New- 
ton's father, grandfather, and his uncle, 
Rev. E. H. Newton, D.D., are prominently 
mentioned in the history of Newfane. 

The Rev. James Tufts, his grandfather, 
for forty years the pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church at Wordsboi'O, was "a strong 
man of wise influence," says the History of 
Wordsboro. 

The patriotism of the famil}- is shown by 
the service of Marshall Newton, Sr. , his 
gfreat-srrandfather, an officer in the French 
and Indian war; the seven years' service 
of his grandfather, Marshall Newton, Jr., 
in the war of the Revolution ; the service 
of his brother, John, four years in the i8th 
U. S. Infantrv, and James Holland, in the 
9th and 17th Vermont Volunteers, who was 
killed while leading his company in the 
last grand charge at Spottsylvania, May 
12, 1864. 



121 




3 



0^S 



m 



% 




/ 



JOEL R. HOUGH 



Joel R. Hough, of Walling-ford, was 
born in that town October 4th, 1841, and is 
therefore tifty-three years of age. He re- 
ceived a common-school education. He 
enlisted Aug. 6, 1862, in Co. K, 15th Conn. 
Vols., and served until the close of the war. 
He is a farmer, in politics a Republican. 



Mr. Hough is Past-Master of Walling- 
ford Grange, has been a member of the 
Board of Relief, and is at present Assessor. 
He is vice-president ot the Wallingford 
Agricultural Society, and a member of 
Agricultural Committee in the present 
Legislature. 



va 




SAMUEL M. BAILEY 



Samuel H. Bailey, of Wolcott, is no 
stranger to the capitol, he having been a 
member of the House of 1891-92. He 
made a name as a hard worker at that 
time in the interests of his constituency, 
and he is expected to bring his experience 
to bear in the coming session to making a 
still more enviable record. I le was born 
in Wolcott, Januaiy 7, 1831. His educa- 



tion was derived entirely from the com- 
mon schools. Mr. Bailey was among those 
who responded to the nation's need and 
went to the front as a private in Co. E, 20th 
l^egiment of Connecticut Volunteers. He 
saw much fighting. He is a farmer, and a 
Republican in politics. At present he is 
Treasurer of the local School Fund and of 
the Town Deposit Fund. 



in 



Erwin W. Wkhstkr is the Democratic member of 
the Ansonia contingent. lie was a member of the 
House of 1893 and served on the Committee on Appro- 
priations. He has held many important local offices, 
all of which he has filled with the same credit that at- 
tended his previous term in the Legislature. He was 
the town agent for Derby for seven years consecutively, 
and has held the same office in Ansonia. He was also 
a member of the board of education in the town of 
Derby, and burgess and treasurer of the borough of 
Ansonia. Mr. Webster was born in Bethlehem, Conn., 
April 9, 1836. He is a man of affairs and much es- 
teemed. He is connected with the railroad and mer- 
cantile business. 

Silas Edward Jeralds is a manufacturer. He is an 
earnest Republican and has always worked hard in 
the interests of his party. He is respected and pop- 
ular and has the confidence of all his town people, 
both Republicans and Democrats, simply for his worth 
as a citizen and for the consistency of his life and 
habits. He has been selectman and town agent of 
Cheshire, peforming the duties of these offices with 
distinguished ability and in a manner that indicates his 
fitness for the latest honor that has been conferred 
upon him. He was born in Prospect, April i, 1830. In 
his youth he got no more education than could be fur- 
nished by the common schools. 

Otis Jerome Ran(;e is well known throughout the 
State, having been for sixteen years Grand Chief Tem- 
plar of the Order of Good Templars of Connecticut. 
He is also a preacher of much ability, and has gained 
considerable fame in the pulpit and on the platform. 
He was a member of the House of Representatives be- 
fore, in 1884, and attained considerable prominence at 
that time by his forceful, argumentative powers. He was 
born in Meriden, September 28, 1840. He was kept at 
school until he was seventeen years of age, graduating 
from an academy. He served four years at Parker, 
Snow, Brooks & Co.'s establishment, learning the ma- 
chinist's trade. He joined the M. E. Church in 1846, 
and has been preaching the gospel for thirty years. He 
is a Republican. Mr. Range is very well known in 
Hartford from his religious and temperance connec- 
tions. 

Erastus Dudley got his education in the schools of 
his native town, Guilford, and at a business college in 
New Haven. He was born December 20, 1849. He is 
a farmer and a Republican. At present he is an assessor, 
a position which he has held before. 



David M. Mitchell says he is a Republican "every 
time." That little remark proclaims him one of the loyal 
body who bear upon their breastplates the honorable 
word, "staunch." He was born in Southbury fifty- 
three years ago. He was educated at the common 
schools and at the Lewis, Hinman, and Thompson 
academics. He has held various town offices, includ- 
ing that of selectman. He has been trustee for a num- 
ber of important estates. He is a farmer. 

Frank Mason Twitchell has never before held 
office. He is a Democrat. In business he is a manu- 
facturer. He was born in Naugatuck in 1S56. He at- 
tended the Wesleyan Academy at Wilbraham, Mass 
He has always been modestly identified with public in- 
terests, giving his time in plenty, but never claiming 
any of the honors and emoluments of office until, as he 
says, he committed this, " his first offense." 

William F. Downer, representative from Hamden, 
has had the honor to be chairman of the Republican 
Town Committee in that place for twelve years. He 
has been so complimented by his fellow-citizens because 
of his unswerving devotion to his party, and it is illus- 
trative of Mr. Downer's ability and tact that his election 
as representative is looked upon with favor by Demo- 
crats as well as Republicans. He was born in New 
York, August 12, 1850. 

Myron Hubbard Munger is particularly interested 
in educational subjects. He is a member of the town 
school committee and acting school visitor. He will 
take a leading part in advancing the passage of a de- 
sirable educational measure during the next four months 
at the Capitol. He is a member of the Congregational 
Church. Mr. Munger was town tax collector for three 
years. He was born in North Madison, October g, 
1855. He attended in his youth the district and select 
schools. Now he is a farmer and a Republican. He 
received a highly complimentary vote from his fellow- 
citizens in Madison, indicating that he stands high in 
the regard of his neighbors. 

Lewis Hitchcock has a war record. He saw much 
service while a private in the 27th Connecticut Volun- 
teers. He is a farmer. He was born in Bethany, 
December 4, 1838. He received no further educational 
advantages than those afforded by the common schools. 

Horatio N. Smith was born in the town that has 
honored him with election to the general assembly. He 
is 42 years of age and a Democrat. By trade he is a 
butcher. He is now a member of the local school com- 
mittee. 




FREDERICK H. PARMELEE 



Frederick H. Parmelee, of New Lon- 
don, one of the most prominent business 
men of the city of New London, is now its 
first representative. He was born in Dur- 
ham, September 2, 1833. He received a 
common-school education, adding to it a 
high school course. 

In 185 I he removed to New London, and 
has been in business since 1856 as a mer- 
chant. 

He is a railroad and steamship ticket 
agent, doing a large business for the 
domestic and foreign steamship lines, and 



nearl}' all of the foreign banking business 
in the city. 

In city matters he has served as a Coun- 
cilman for three years and an Alderman 
for six years, being senior Alderman for 
three years and Chairman of the Finance 
Committee. During Harrison's adminis- 
tration he was Deputy Collector of Inter- 
nal Revenue. He is now one of the Asses- 
sors of New London. He is prominent in 
church work. He is a leading Mason, hold- 
ing several offices, and having been Grand 
Commander of Knights Templars of Conn. 



12,5 




CHARLES ROYCE BOSS 



Charles Royce Boss, the second repre- 
sentative from New London, is the young- 
est member of the House, having been 
born November i, 1871, and being now 23 
years old. He was educated in the pubhc 



schools and in the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, from which he graduated 
last June. He is analytical chemist for 
C. D. Boss & Son, cracker manufacturers. 
In politics he is a Republican. 



I;i6 




GARDINER GREENE, Jr. 



GyXRDiNER Greene, Jr., first representa- 
tive from Norwich, is one ot the most abk" 
and most [)rominent Ivepiiblicans ot the 
House. As a cool and briUiant strategist 
he won an enviable reputation in the " dead- 
lock " session of 1891, when he represented 
Norwich. It was largely owing to his 
generalship that the Republicans of the 
House went through the trying session 
with so much success. Mr. Greene was 
Chairman ot the Committee on Canvass of 
Votes for State officers. He was born 



forty-three years ago, and was edu- 
cated in the Norwich Free Academy, 
Yale College and the Columbia Law 
School. He got the degree of B.A. from 
Yale in 1873. 

A large law practice has been easily ac- 
quired by Mr. Greene, who is known widely 
as one ot the most brilliant and promising 
attorneys in Connecticut. Republicans 
ma}' confidently count on Mr. Greene's 
vote and influence in all legislation which 
inures to the benefit of good citizenship. 



137 



^^9 ws^ 




HOWARD C. BROWN 



Howard C. Brown, of Colchester, was 
born April 9th, 1839, in Willimantic. He 
spent his boyhood days on his lather's 
large farm, Willimantic. The farm has 
been in possession of the family for 222 
years, and is now occupied by his mother, 
who is 83 years of age. Mr. Brown takes 
considerable pride in his family history. 
He belongs to one of the oldest and most 
respected families ot the town of Wind- 
ham. He is the eighth generation from 
John Brown, the first settler at Plymouth, 
and of the seventh generation from John 
Mason, of Norwich, the hero of the Pequot 
war. Mr. Brown received an excellent 
education at the district school and by 
a private tutor, Wm. Weaver, then editor 



of the Willimantic Journal, and for several 
years was a school teacher, commencing 
when he was but 17 years of age. 

He is the senior member of the firm of 
Brown Brothers, manufacturers of paper, 
and has been successfully engaged in the 
business for a quarter of a century. The 
firm receive, what they deserve, a large 
patronage, and are rated high in business 
circles. On December 31, 1870, he was 
married to Lucy A. Tefft, of Coventry. 
They have four children, Curtis P., Jessie 
L., Earle W., and Helen L. 

Mr. Brown needs no words of commen- 
dation, as his career is a sufficient 
testimonial of his integrity and upright- 
ness. 



128 




GEORGE P. HILL 



George P. Hill, of East Lyme, was 
born in Philadelphia, January 30, 1857, and 
was left an orphan at an early age, his 
father having been killed in the battle ot 
Gettysburg, and his mother dying soon 
after. Just before the close of the war he 
came North to Vermont, where he worked 
on a farm summers and went to school 
winters. From there he went to Shel- 
burne, Mass., where he remained eight 
years. He has lived in Niantic fifteen 
years, and about nine years of that time 
successfully followed the Menhaden fish- 
ery business. He was engaged with Luce 
Brothers, where he rose to be second cap- 
tain of one of their steamers. Six years ago 
he embarked in his present business, that 



ot ice cream, confectionery, etc., and has 
met with merited success, doing a large 
and profitable business. He held the 
position of constable for four successive 
years with entire satisfaction to the public 
and honor to himself. On January 19, 
1887, he married Miss Emma U. Flint, of 
Lyme. A history of his career is but 
another example of what can be done by 
push, industry and good business prin- 
ciples. He was a poor boy, but by putting 
to their best use the sterling qualities with 
which he is endowed, has risen to his 
present position. 

He has always been a consistent Demo- 
crat, but allows no politics to invade his 
social circle. 



129 




CLAYTON HYDE LATHROP 



Clayton Hyde Lath hop, of Franklin, 
was born in Colchester, July 20, 1857. His 
educati(jn included a course in the Kock- 
ville High School. He is now Assessor 
and School Visitor, having been acting 
School Visitor for fourteen years. He has 
also been Justice oi the Peace. He has 
followed the callings of farming and school 
teaching. In politics he is a Republican, 
and has done yeoman duty in the service 
of his party. 

As a farmer he is progressive and wide- 



awake. He has one of the best farms in the 
State. He takes a lively interest in dairy 
and stock raising, and is deeply interested 
in all educational matters. 

He was married March 31, 1880, to 
Estella J. Smith, of Franklin. They have 
one son, Clayton Huntington. Mr. 
Lathroj) is the popular District Deputy 
of the A. O. U. VV., and a member 
of the Lebanon Grange, No. 21, of 
which he was Lecturer for several 
years. 



130 




CHARLES H. SMITH 



Charles H. Smith, of Groton, was born 
in Woauk, September lo, 1851. He re- 
ceived an excellent education in the com- 
mon schools of his native town. In i8gi- 
92 he was an active and popular member 
of the House, serving on the Committee on 
Fisheries, of which he is at present Chair- 
man. He began the business of boat and 



yacht building twenty-two years ago, and 
by proverbial industry and honest dealing 
has built up a large and ever-increasing 
business. He is a Reijublican, and on that 
ticket was elected to the present Legisla- 
ture. On Nov. 16, 1.S72, he married Mary 
E. Potter, of Woauk. They are highly 
respected by a large circle of friends. 



rn 




JUDSON F. BAILEY 



JuDSON F. Bailey, ol Groton, was born 
in Groton, February i6, 1865. His school 
days were spent in the institutions ot 
learning in his native town, completing his 
education in the Mystic Valley Institute. 
He is one of the youngest members of the 
House, and is wide-awake and faithful. 
By first-class goods and square dealing he 



has built up a large and growing meat 
business. He is also a successful real 
estate agent. He was married June 
7, 1884, to Mary Gra}-, of Groton. 
They have one child, a daughter, Ethel 
G. Mr. Bailey is a Republican, and is 
a valued member of several leading secret 
societies. 



132 




ROBERT E. TURNER 



Robert E. Turner, of Lebanon, was 
born in Led3'ard forty-two years ago. 

His early education he obtained in the 
public schools, and several years in select 
schools. Thus he fitted for the calling of a 
teacher, which avocation he followed for six 
years with the most encouraging success. 

During this time his training was sup- 
plemented by private study, which extend- 
ed to the study of law and the classics. 
For ten years he conducted the business of 
a contractor and builder. 

He has for many years been connected 
with literary work and literary and educa- 
tional societies. 

In 1890 he was accepted and ordained 
into the Gospel Ministry by a large Eccle- 
siastical Council called for the purpose by 



the Central Baptist Church of Norwich, ot 
which he was a member. He entered the 
Newton Theological University and grad- 
uated in 1892. 

He accepted a call extended by the 
First Baptist Church of Lebanon, and 
also by the Fitchville Baptist Church, 
and has been pastor of both these 
churches for three years. He is Chair- 
man of the Lebanon Board of Education, 
and is much interested in the cause of 
schools. 

He is an enthusiastic lover of the " flag," 
and has taken an active part in raising the 
flag over a large number of schools. 

As a member of the present Legislature 
he is one of the Committee on Education. 
He is also a Republican. 



133 




JAMES E. ROBERTS 



James E. Roberts, of Lisbon, one of the 
twenU'-one Republicans from New London 
County, was born in Providence, R. I., on 
November 9, 1841. He received his edu- 
cation in the common schools. In spite of 
limited earh- advantages he has made his 
mark, and now enjoys the richly merited 
respect ot the community. He is a Select- 
man of Lisbon, having held office for some 
years. By occupation he is a roll coverer. 



Mr. Roberts is deeply interested in Ma- 
sonic work, being a member of Mt. Vernon 
Lodge, No. 75, F. & A. M., Jewett City; 
Franklin Chapter, No. 4, R. A. M., Nor- 
wich ; Franklin Council. No. 3, R. & S. M., 
Norwich ; Columbian Commander}', No. 
4, K. T., Norwich ; Reliance Lodge, I. 
O. O. F., Jewett City, and is also a 
Shriner, as a member of P3'ramid Temple, 
of Bridgeport. 



134 




J. GRIFFIN ELY 



J. Griffin Ely, of Lyme, was born in 
that town, September 22, 1857. His early 
life was spent on a farm, where he worked 
hard and diligently for the money that was 
to play so important a part in his subse- 
quent education The dollars were not 
many, but Dr. Ely now admits that the 
experience proved valuable. 

His schooling as a boy was such as was 
afforded by the district system and a select 
class. In 1875 he entered the Connecticut 
Literary Institute of Suffield, took the col- 
lege preparatory course, and graduated in 
1879. 

The next vear he entered Beilevue Hos- 
pital Medical College, graduating in 1884, 



and afterward took a post-graduate course 
in New York, during which time he was a 
special student under Prof. Wm. H. Welch. 
Upon the death of his father, in 1886, Dr. 
Ely succeeded him in practice in his native 
town, where he has since remained. In 
politics he is, and always has been, a Dem- 
ocrat. Since his majority Dr. Ely has 
been a member of the School Board ; for 
quite a number its chairman. 

For the last seven years he has 
been Health Officer of the town, an 
office he still holds, and is also Medical 
Examiner (under appointment of A. F. 
Park, Coroner of New London County) 
for the district of Lyme. 



135 




GEO. F. COATS 



Geo. F. Coats, of North Stonington, 
was born in that town in 1841, and has 
resided there most of his life, living for a 
few years just over the line in Stonington. 
He has been a farmer most of his life. 

Mr. Coats has held various town offices, 
having been a member of the Board of As- 



sessors and Board of Relief for three years 
each, besides being Acting School Visitor 
in both towns for eighteen years. He is a 
Republican, and has always voted that 
ticket. Mr. Coats is a member of the 
Committee on New Towns and Probate 
Districts. 



i 



I 



136 




ALVAH MORGAN 



Alvah Morgan, of Salem, was born in 
Salem, August 3, 1840. He received a 
common-school education. He has been 
First Selectman, Town Clerk, Town 
Treasurer, Assessor, and member of the 
Town Board of Education. In 1891-92 he 
was a member of the House of Represent- 
atives. He is now Town Clerk, Town 



Treasurer, on the Town Board of Educa- 
tion, and is also Chairman of the Demo- 
cratic Town Committee. He has devoted 
his life to farming. On August 23, 1862, 
he enlisted as a private in Company A, 26th 
Regiment, C. V. He was wounded at 
Fort Hudson, La, He is a member of the 
Committee on Agriculture. 



137 




THOMAS HUBBARD ALLEN 



Thomas Hubbard Allen, of Sprague, 
son of the late Col. Ethan Alleii, comes to 
the House with a well-known record, hav- 
ing been a member of that branch of the 
Legislature in 1885, 1886, 1889 and 1893. 
and of the Senate in 1887. He was the 
youngest member of the House in 1885, 
and of the Senate in 1887, Mr. Allen was 
born in Hanover, town of Sprague, in 1862, 
and was educated at the East Greenwich 
B. L Academy and the Highland Militar}- 
Academy, Worcester, Mass., from which 
institution he graduated as the valedic- 
torian of his class and Captain of the Cadet 
Corps. He was for eight vears a member 
of the Third Rea^iment, C. X. G., retirinaf 
as Captain and Inspector of Rifle Practice. 
He was an Aid-de-Camp at the inaugura- 
tion of Benjamin Harrison as President ; 



was a Delegate to the National Repub- 
lican Convention at Chicago in 1888, and 
to the Centennial Celebration in New 
York in 1889 : was First Selectman for five 
years. 

In 1885 was Clerk of the Committee on 
Eng-rossed Bills: in 1886 Chairman of the 
Committee on Militar}- Aftairs and Clerk 
of Library Committee; in 1887 Senate 
Chairman of Committee on Military Af- 
fairs and Canvass of Votes for Justices of 
the Peace ; in 1889 Chairman of Committee 
on Militar}- Affairs; in 1893 Chairman of 
Committee on Cities and Boroughs, and 
member of Committee on Joint Rules, and 
in 1895 Chairman of Committee on Mili- 
tarv Affairs. Mr. Allen is engaged in the 
manufacture of woolen goods, and is a 
Republican. 



1:JS 




% 




JAMES PENDLETON 



James Pendleton, of Stonington, was 
born in the town which he represents, in 
1854, and is the third son of the late Harris 
and Sarah Ann (Chester) Pendleton. 

Mr. Pendleton obtained his education in 
the public and private schools of Stoning- 
ton. At the age of 20 years he entered the 
employ of a contractor and builder, being 
assigned to office work, where he remained 
until 1878, when he engaged in the pro- 
vision and fruit business. Tn 1881 he was 
appointed to the office of Postmaster at 
Stonington by President Chester A. Arthur. 
This position he filled acceptably for nearly 
five years, when a Democratic successor 
was appointed. In 1884 he was united 
in marriage to Sarah Elizabeth Potter, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Three sons have blessed 



the union, the eldest being now g years of 
age. For three years he held the office of 
Selectman, discharging its duties to the sat- 
isfaction of his townsmen. He was for 
several years Registrar of Electors, and 
has held several minor offices. He was for 
sixteen years a Burgess, and at the present 
time he holds the office of Warden of the 
Borough of Stonington. In business and 
politics Mr. Pendleton is an active worker, 
being the proprietor of a large retail gro- 
cery and baking business. He was elected 
to the General Assembly as a Republican, 
by a large majority, from a strongly 
Democratic town, and has been honored 
by the Speaker in the appointment to a 
position upon the important Committee on 
Railroads. 



139 




HENRY BYRON NOYES, Jr. 



Henry Byron Noyes, Jr., of Stoning- 
ton, was born in Mystic, April 15, 1871, 
and is 23 years old. 

He was educated in the common schools 
of his native place, Westerly (R. I.), High 



School, and at Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass. 

His occupation is that of a banker, 
and he was elected as a Republican in a 
strongly Democratic town. 



140 




WILLIAM C. SAUNDERS 



William C. Saunders was bom in 
Westerly, R. I., October i8, 1853. His 
common-school education was supple- 
mented by a high school course. He has 
creditably occupied the offices of Post- 
master and Town Auditor, holding, at the 
present time, the latter position, and is 
also a Justice of the Peace. He was Secre- 
tary of the Board ot School Visitors for 
six years, and continues to be a member of 
the Board. Mr. Saunders was married 
January 15, 1880, to Rosa M. Beebe, of 



Waterford. They have one daughter, 
Winnifred. 

Representative Saunders is the success- 
ful proprietor of a general store. His 
popularity is plainly shown by the con- 
tinued honors extended him by his towns- 
men, and by the fact that although his 
town is strongly Democratic he was 
the first Republican elected in seven- 
teen years, receiving a large majority. 
He is Clerk of the Committee on Humane 
Institutions. 



141 



John M. Brkwer was born in East Hartford Oc- 
tober 7, 1S43, his education including finishing courses 
in the East Hartford Academy and the Lewis Academy 
of Southington. He is now commander of the Con- 
necticut Department, G. A. R. During the war he 
served in the Sixteenth Connecticut. He was council- 
man for the City of Norwich for two years, alderman 
for two years. He was commander of Sedgwick Post, 
G. A. R., for three years and is a past president of the 
Arcanum Club. His politics is Republican. His 
business is that of an apothecary. 

William E. Harvey was born in Colchester Oc- 
tober 30, 1846. He is a graduate of the Bacon 
Academy, Colchester. He has been an assessor in his 
native town and has served with ability as committee- 
man in his school district. He has followed agricul- 
tural pursuits. In politics he is a Republican and is 
looked on as a valuable and conscientious party 
worker. 

John Potter was born in Voluntovvn in 1869 and is 
one of the young men in the General Assembly. His 
education included a course in the New Hampton 
Institute and Commercial College, from which he 
graduated in 1891. In i8gi and 1892 he was in the 
Yale Law School. He is now secretary of the Gris- 
wold Board of Education. He is engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. Mr. Potter is a Jeffersonian and a 
man of ability, and will make his way. 

HoBART McCall, of Lebanon, was born May 19, 
1826, the second son of Deacon Henry McCall, and 
has always resided in Lebanon. After his mar- 
riage, in 1852, he occupied the farm where his 
father was born and his grandfather lived many years. 
His mother, Melissa Hale, was a daughter of Rev. 
Enoch Hale, who graduated at Yale College in 1773 in 
the same class with his younger brother, Nathan 
Hale, the patriot of Revolutionary fame. Rev. Enoch 
Hale was ordained the first pastor in Wesrhampton, 
Mass., September 20, 1779, where he remained till his 
death, January 14, 1837, after a ministry of 57 years. 
Mr. Hale's first and his present wife are also descend- 
ants of the Hale family. He has one daughter. 
Mr. McCall was on the board of assessors for two 
terms, being also a member of the board of relief. 
He is the oldest representative in his county and may 
justly be looked upon as the Nestor of the county 
delegation. 

George W. Rouse was born in Griswold in 1847 and 
is 47 years old. Common schools gave him his educa- 
tion in boyhood. He made his way rapidly. While 
still a youth he enlisted in Company G, Twelfth Con- 
necticut Volunteers, and served during the remainder 
of the war. He has followed the grocery business, 
but also has taken an interest in town politics. His 
fellow-townsmen have elected him registrar of voters 
and grand juror. He has also been registrar of mar- 
riages, births and deaths, and postmaster. He is a 
notary public, is quartermaster of Smith Post, No. 45, 
G. A. R., and is a member of the United Workmen, 
the Odd Fellows and the Masons. In politics he 
prefers to affiliate with the Republican party. 



Charles A. Gray, chairman of the Democratic 
Town Committee, will represent this town during 
Governor CoflSn's administration. Mr. Gray was born 
in Groton, February 11, 1858. He was educated in 
the common schools of his native town. Besides 
representative, he is now registrar of voters in Led- 
yard. Previously he has been tax collector, assessor, 
constable and selectman. His occupation is farming. 
In the Assembly he will act with the Democratic party, 
of which he is an active member. 

Roswell p. LaPlace was born in Lyme September 
4, 1828, and is 66 years old. His early education was 
obtained in the common schools, but in spite of disad- 
vantages he has steadily made his way and enjoys the 
respect of his townsmen. He is a member of the 
board of relief. The business he has generally fol- 
lowed is manufacturing. The Republican party may 
rely on his best services. 

George N. Wood, who represents the town of 
Montville in the General Assembly, first saw the light 
in East Greenwich, R. I., April i, 1837. His educa- 
tion was received mainly in the common schools. He 
is the Montville Republican registrar of voters, having 
held that office thirteen years, deputy sheriff in New 
London County, assistant town clerk and chairman of 
the Republican Town Committee. He has been con- 
stable, collector (for four years) and selectman (one 
year). He is a teamster and liveryman by occupation. 

Amasa M. Main was born in Ledyard sixty-three 
years ago and has passed the greater portion of his 
life in New London County. He is a farmer and has 
won an enviable reputation as a successful one. In 
politics he supports the fortunes of the Republican 
party. 

James F. Bugbee's birthplace is Tolland, where he 
first saw the light January 31, 1863. He was educated 
in the common schools. His business is that of 
general merchant. Mr. Bugbee is a member of the 
Old Lyme Board of Relief. He belongs to Crystal 
Lodge, No. 88, I. O. O. F., Pythagoras Lodge, No. 45, 
A. F. and A. M. and Mohegan Council, No. 75, 
O. U. A. M. He affiliates with the Democratic party. 

Austin A. Chapman, first representative, is a native 
of Preston. The year of his birth was 1828 and he is 
66 years of age. Common school gave him his early 
education. In 1874 and again in 1884 he sat in the 
House of Representatives. His occupation is that of 
a mason. In political questions he champions the 
views of the Democratic party. 

Ai'I'LETON Main was born in North Stonington 
January 23, 1855. His education included "finishing" 
in the Providence Conference Seminary. He was for 
four years selectman and is now a justice of the peace, 
assessor and school visitor. He has generally pur- 
sued the callings of farmer and groceryman. In 
politics he must be classified as a Democrat. 

Willard J. Way was born in Salem February 18, 
1859. He was educated in the common schools. He 
is now an assessor and a grand juror. His occupa- 
tion is farming. He is a prominent Democrat, enjoy- 
ing the esteem of his party workers. 



14-.> 




EDWARD WILLIAMS MARSH 



Edward Williams Marsh, of Bridge- 
port, is one of the most prominent business 
men of Bridgeport, having held many 
positions of trust in financial institutions. 
He was born at New Milford, January 24, 
1836. He was educated in the public 
schools of New Milford, at Brace's Acad- 
emy and at Alger Institute, South Crom- 
well, Conn. In 1862 he enlisted in the 
Volunteers, and received the appointment 
of Quartermaster-Sergeant, and started 
with the Nineteenth Regiment, Conn. Vol. 
infantry, for Washington, D. C, September 
15, 1862. He was ordered to Alexan- 
dria, Va., and was stationed near that 
city for eighteen months. In 1863 his 
regiment was in front of Alexandria, and 
during the year was changed to the Second 
Connecticut Heavy Artillery. In 1864, 
when General Grant took command of the 
Army of the Potomac, it joined his Army 



in the Wilderness, and was assigned to the 
Second Brigade, First Division, Sixth 
Army Corps. He was then Captain of 
Company M, 150 men, in an artillerj' regi- 
ment of twelve companies, 1,800 men, but 
doing infantry duty. The regiment was 
at Cold Harbor and in front of Petersburg 
and was with General Sheridan in the 
Shenandoah Valley and transferred back 
to Army of Potomac in front of Petersburg, 
where it remained until the close of war. 
In public life Mr. Marsh represented First 
Ward of Bridgeport in the Board ot 
Aldermen. He is at present Vice-Presi- 
dent ot the Y. M. C. A. and the Bridge- 
port Hospital, the First National Bank and 
the Bryant Electric Company, and a di- 
rector of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas 
Trust Company of Kansas City, and for 
eight years Secretary and Treasurer of the 
People's Saving Bank of Bridgeport. 



143 




CHARLES KELLER 



Charles Keller, of Bridgeport, Repub- 
lican, was born in New York City, Jan. lo, 
1854. His early education was obtained in 
a German school and in the public night 
schools. At the age of thirteen he was 
apprenticed to a piano firm, and worked at 
the trade continuously. In 1887, in com- 
pany with a younger brother, he estab- 
lished the piano firm of Keller Bros., now 
Keller Bros. & Blight, at Bridgeport, and 
the business is very satisfactory. He is 
deeply interested in German societies, and 
is a prominent member of the German 
societies in Bridgeport. While in New 



York Captain Keller was greatly interested 
in the militia, having entered the service as 
a private and leaving it as Captain of Co. 
I, Twenty-fifth Regiment. 

He took a great interest in rifle practice, 
and for four years was a member of the 
Third Division Team, and later of the 
State Team. Mr. Keller was prominently 
known as one ot the best shots in the 
State. 

On April 11, 1874, he married Miss 
Emma Gilbert, of Chicago. They have 
had seven children, four of whom are 
living — Charles, Emma, Joseph and John. 



144 



1 




CHARLES BAILEY 



Charles Bailey, of Bethel, Republican, 
was born in Columbus, Chenango County, 
New York, Jan. 26, 1833. His early life 
was passed on the farm of his adopted 
father, George Clapp, with whom he came 
to live, in the town of Bethel, in 1835. 

He received a common-school education. 
At the age of 17 he was apprenticed to the 
silk hatting business for four years, after- 
ward learning the fur hatting business, 
and now is engaged in curling stiff fur hats. 
He was married Nov. 29, 1855 ; a family ot 
six children was born, of whom four are 
living, three sons and one daughter. At 
the call of Lincoln for nine months' troops, 
on Sept. 2, 1862, he enlisted in Co. G, 23d 
Regt., Conn. Vols., of which he was Second 
Lieutenant, and they were sent to the Gult 



Department, 19th Army Corps, under Gen. 
N. P. Banks. On June 23, 1863, at the 
battle of Brashear City, La., he was taken 
prisoner of war, and spent thirteen months 
in Tyler, Texas, in a rebel prison, being 
exchanged at Red River Landing, July 22, 
1864, receiving his discharge at Hartford, 
Aug. 9, 1864. He has never held political 
office until the present time, being elected 
by the largest majority ever given a Rep- 
resentative from the town. At present he 
holds the office of Deacon in the First 
Congregational Church, is Secretary and 
Treasurer of the School Board, Chaplain 
of Eureka Lodge, No. 83, F. A. M., a mem- 
ber of James E. Moore Post, No. 18, G. A. 
R., and held the office of Superintend- 
ent of the Sabbath School for ten years. 



145 




CHARLES W. LOUNSBURY 



Charles W. Lounsbury, of Dorien, 
was born in Eddyville, N. Y., March 22, 
1842, and received a common-school edu- 
cation. 

He is a Republican, and was a member 
of the Legislature in 1893. 

For twenty years he has been a Trial 
Justice of the town and notary public, 
besides School Committee,Treasurer of his 
District, and was also chairman of the 
Building Committee for Canter School 
District. 

Mr. Lounsbury has been chairman of 



Superior Court Committee in oyster 
ground matters, and a member of the 
Board of School Visitors. In the present 
Legislature he is on the committee on 
Humane Institutions. 

He served in Company A, Seventeenth 
Connecticut Volunteers during the Civil 
War, and in business life has been identi- 
fied with the stove, hardware and house- 
furnishing goods trade, besides acting as 
executor and administrator of several 
estates, and commissioner on probate 
matters. 



146 




EBER GOULD 



Eber Gould, of Easton, was born in 
that town June 2, 1831. He has held sev- 
eral local offices. For the last five years 
he has been First Selectman. He has been 
a Justice of the Peace and has served as a 
juryman. 

Mr. Gould is a farmer by occupation. 
He is a steward and trustee of the Meth- 
odist Church, and was collector and treas- 
urer for a period of eighteen years. 



On September 26, 1852, he married 
Sarah J. Brown, of Fairfield, who died 
October 11, 1857. On January 16, 1859, 
he married Amelia S. Brown, a sister of 
his first wife. 

He had one daughter by his first wife, 
Jennie, the wife of Edgar G. Jennings. 

Mr. Gould is a staunch Republican, and 
has a watchful eye for the best interests of 
his party and good government. 



147 




MICHAEL B. LACEY 



Michael B. Lacey, of Fairfield, is a 
native of the town he represents, and was 
born Feb. i, 1832. He is a jobber and 
repairer of carriages. He was well edu- 
cated in the public schools. He has been 
honored by his townsmen by being elected 
to most of the offices of the town, including 
that of Selectman, Assessor, School Visitor 
and on the Board of Relief. He is a mem- 
ber of the Town Committee, and is the 
efficient Chairman of the Town School 



Committee. On April 25, i860, he married 
Ann Elizabeth Wilson. They have one 
child, a son, Charles C, born May 19, 1874, 
who is the capable manager of his father's 
business during his absence. Mr. Lacey 
is a Republican and a member of the 
important Committee on Education. 
There is probably no more faithful, 
genial, and respected member in the 
House than the senior member from Fair- 
field. 



148 




JOHN F. CLOSE 



John F. Close, of Greenwich, was born 
in that town January 19, 1839, ^^id was edu- 
cated at the Greenwich Academy. For 
eighteen years he was engaged in mercan- 
tile business, but is now a farmer. He was 
Selectman for two years, Judge of Probate 



for the same length of time, and was Town 
Treasurer for three years. Besides these 
offices Mr. Close is now a director in the 
Greenwich Trust Loan and Deposit Com- 
pany. He has always been a Republican, 
and sees no reason to change. 



149 




SEAMAN MEAD 



Seamax Mead, of Greenwich, is 56 
years of age, having been born in Green- 
wich, November 5, 1838, and has been a 
life-long Republican. He is a graduate of 
the Greenwich Academy, and a farmer. 
He is at present an Assessor of the town. 
He has been Chairman of the Town Com- 
mittee for ten A-ears, an Assessor for eight- 
een years, and a director in the Green- 
wich Loan and Trust Company since its 
organization. 

Mr. Mead's ancestors, for several gen- 
erations, have been activelv identified 



with the best interests of their town 
and State. His great-grandfather was 
a surgeon in the French and Indian 
war; was several times a member of the 
Colonial, and afterward of the State, 
Legislature, and was a ratifier of the 
Federal Constitution. His grandfather 
rendered valuable services during the 
Revolutionarv War as a member of the 
Committee of Saletv, and his lather twice 
represented Greenwich in the Legislature, 
and held man}- other positions of honor 
and trust. 



150 




GOULD ABIJA SHELTON 



Gould Abija Shelton, M. D., was born in 
Huntington, Conn., August 19, 1841. 

He obtained iiis preparatory education at 
Staples Academy, Easton, Conn., and entered 
Yale College in the class of 1866. He pur- 
sued the studies of the academic department 
for two years, then entered the Yale School of 
Medicine, receiving the degree of M. D. in 
1869, and the honorary degree of M. A. from 
the same University in 1891. He entered 
upon the active practice of his profession in 
1869 in the village of Shelton, in his native 
town, and has continued uninterruptedly in the 
field since that time. It is an interesting fact 
that the medical field of Huntington has been 
occupied by three successive generations in 
the same family since 1789, viz. : Dr. William 
Shelton, Dr. James H. Shelton and Dr. Gould 
A. Shelton. 

Dr. Shelton has held many prominent public 
offices, having been a member of the Board of 
Burgesses of the Borough of Shelton in 1885, 



-'87-'88; Warden of the borough in 1890, -'91- 
'92, an active member of the Board of Educa- 
tion of Huntington from 1870 to 1888; elected 
president of the Shelton Water Company in 
1893; director of Shelton Savings Bank since 
its incorporation; secretary and director of the 
Silver Plate Cutlery Company since 1893; 
president Board of Park Commissioners, and 
trustee of the Plumb Fund, and is now en- 
gaged in erecting the Plumb Memorial Library 
for the town of Huntington. Dr. Shelton is a 
member of the American Medical Association, 
the Connecticut Medical Society, the Fairfield 
County Medical Society, and its president in 
18S9; also president of the Yale Medical 
Alumni Association in 1894. He married, 
June 16, 1874, Miss Emily Plumb Capel, of 
Shelton. 

In politics Dr. Shelton has always been a 
Republican, and during this session has served 
as Chairman of the Committee on Public 
Health. 



151 




ELBERT ORVILLE HULL 



Elbert Orvillk Hull, of Monroe, was 
born in the town he represents on the twenty- 
second day of May, 1864. His parents are 
Orville H. Hull, who was a member of the 
House of 1885, and Mary J. Johnson, both 
natives of Monroe. His paternal ancestry is 
traced back to old Colonial times, when three 
Hull brothers came to this State from P^ngland, 
and upon the maternal side he comes from 
New England stock. He has always lived in 
Monroe, and attended the village school until 
seventeen years of age when he taught in the 
■district schools in the vicinity of his home for 
two years. He then entered the Worcester, 
Mass., academy from which he was subse- 
quently graduated. After his graduation he 
entered Brown University at Providence, R I., 
but before the end of his freshman year was 
obliged to discontinue his studies owing to 
weak eyesight. The succeeding fall he was 
chosen principal of the high school at Plymouth, 
Conn., and after holding that position for two 
years he resigned, to take up the study of his 



chosen profession, the law. In June, 1892, he 
was admitted to the Fairfield County Bar, 
being one of the seven successful candidates 
out of the thirteen from that county who took 
the examination, and is now a member of the 
law firm of Chamberlain, Bishop tS; Hull, of 
Bridgeport, which firm he entered immediately 
upon his admission to the bar. He has held 
the position of Tax Collector and at present is a 
Justice of the Peace, Chairman of the Town 
Board of Education, and acting school visitor. 
He is a member of the Samuel H. Harris 
Lodge, No. 99, I. O. O. F., of Bridgeport, and 
is also a member of the Stepney Baptist Church 
and at present chairman of the society's com- 
mittee. In politics he is a Republican, being 
the first of that faith to represent the town 
since 1885 and the tenth in its history. 

Mr. Hull is House Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Engrossed Bills, and member of the 
Railroad Committee. 

He is also one of the Auditors of Fairfield 
Countv. 



153 







HOMER L. WANZER 



Homer L. Wanzer was born in New 
Fairfield, March 3, 1850, being the son ot 
Willis H. and Sarah A. Wanzer, and a 
descendant of Abraham Wanzer, who emi- 
grated to America from Hesse Castle, Ger- 
many, and became a Lieutenant in the 
French war in America. At the age of 16 
Mr. Wanzer attended a boarding school in 
Oswego Village. His studies were com- 
pleted in 1870 at the Chappaqua Mountain 
Institute in Westchester Count}-, New 
York. 

In 1878 Mr. Wanzer married Miss Mary 
Alice Giddings, daughter of James A. Gid- 
dings, Jr. Mrs. Wanzer died within a few 
years, leaving one daughter, Miss Grace 
Wanzer. He has held the Presidency of 



the Housatonic Agricultural Society two 
years, President of the Town Board ot 
Health at one time, and is a member of the 
Board of Directors of the New Milford 
Asrricultural Association, and its President 
at different times. Has been director ot 
the Housatonic Vallev Creamery Co.; is 
also a member of the Board of Selectmen 
of New Fairfield, which office he has held 
since 1885; has been Inspector of High- 
ways for the past ten years. 

He is a farmer by vocation and a Demo- 
crat in politics, and was elected Represen- 
tative last November bv 71 majority, his 
opponent receiving onlv 42 votes, and 
was the onh- Democratic gain in Fairfield 
Count V. 



15.<J 




EDWIN O. KEELER 



Edwin O. Keeler, of Norwalk, ranks 
among- the foremost of Norwalk's wide- 
awake and prominent men. He was born 
in Ridgefield, January 12, 1846. His father 
was J. C. Keeler, a well-to-do and thrifty 
agriculturist, who took great pride in giv- 
ing his youngest son a good education and 
a thorough practical knowledge of business 
and affairs. The young man came to Xor- 
walk when 15 years old and accepted a 
clerkship in S. E. Olmstead & Co.'s whole- 
sale grocery house, then doing business on 
Main street. He grew in favor with his 
employers and was frequently promoted. 
Later he bought an interest and became a 
partner with Major George M. Holmes in 
the big wholesale grocery business on 
Wall street, now a joint stock concern do- 
ing business under the name of the Holmes, 



Keeler &: Selleck Co., the largest mercan- 
tile business in this town. Mr. Keeler has 
since 1887 been a director in the Fairfield 
County National Bank, and has been its 
President since 1893, he having succeeded 
the late United States Treasurer Hyatt. 
He is an ex-president of the Norwalk Club 
and is one of its leading members. Mr. 
Keeler is an earnest and sincere member 
of the First Congregational Church and 
has been a Committeeman there for fifteen 
consecutive years. He is a member of St. 
John's Lodge of Masons of this city, a 
Knight Templar in Clinton Commandery 
and of the Mystic Shrine ; also a mem- 
ber of the Connecticut Grand Lodge, 
L O. O. F. For many years an active mem- 
ber of the Norwalk Fire Department, and 
a member of the Board of Fire Engineers. 



I 



]>4 




R. H. ROWAN 



R. H. Rowan, of Norwalk, was born in 
East Hebron, Washington County, N. Y., 
1831. His parents were Scotch-Irish. He 
left home when he was twelve. All the 
schooling he ever had he obtained at the 
district school previous to leaving home. 
He worked among the farmers in the 
neighborhood until he was seventeen years 
old ; he then came to Danbury, Conn., and 
learned a branch of the hatting business 
with Hiram and Elijah Sturdevant ; after- 
ward learned paper box making, and was 
superintendent for E. S. Davis for eight 
years. In 1862 he removed to South Nor 
walk and commenced the manufacturing 
of paper boxes en his own account. Here 



he remained until 1881, when his health 
becoming impaired, he sold the plant and 
retired from active business. Mr. Rowan 
was a member of the City Council for some 
years. He was one of the Board of Water 
Commissioners for nine years. 

In 1 88 1 he was elected president of the 
Fairfield Fire Insurance Company, and 
held the office until the company con- 
cluded to close the business. He was 
elected in i879-'8o to represent his town 
in the Legislature. 

In 1 88 1, with a few other gentlemen, he 
organized the City National Bank of South 
Norwalk, was elected its president, and 
still holds the position. 



1.^5 




MILAN H. MEAD 



Milan H. Mead, of Ridgefield, was born 
in Lewisboro, N. Y., x\ugust 29th, 1829, 
and was educated in the common and select 
schools of Ridgefield, his parents removing 
there when he was eight years of agfe. He 
lives upon the farm that he has owned 
since he attained his majority, and which 



he was actively engaged in working for 
twent3-five years. 

In 1876 Mr. Mead became a partner with 
John D. Nash, in the firm of Nash & Mead, 
general merchandise dealers, where he is 
now located, though he personally super- 
intends the work of his farm. 



156 



I 




EDWIN P. WHITE 



Edwin P. White, member of the House 
from Ridgefield, was born in Danbury, Conn., 
on April 9, 1829. He passed all his boyhood in 
the rural community in which he was born, and 
in the district school there he acquired his edu- 
cation. In 1857 he moved to Ridgefield and, in 
the same year, married Lydia M. Birdsall. He 
is a farmer in the sense that he owns and lives 
upon a somewhat extensive farm, but his oc- 
cupation is rather that of a contractor, in which 
direction he has mainly employed his energies. 
He served in the War of the Rebellion, and he 
is prominent in both Grand Army and Masonic 
circles. In his town he has been, at different 
times. Assessor, member of the Board of Re- 
lief, and Selectman. At the recent election 
his majority over his highest Democratic com- 
petitor was 147. In his religious sympathies 



he is a Methodist. His memory goes back to 
no time when he was not intensely opposed to 
slavery, and so when the Republican party 
started he enlisted in its ranks with all the en- 
thusiasm of youth, and he still follows its for- 
tunes and believes in its mission. In his town 
he has been, for many years, one of its leaders. 

Mr. White is fluent in speech and positive in 
opinion, and he has excited the animosities 
and inspired the warm friendships which always 
come to such a character. In each one of his 
ancestral lines he goes back to the pure Anglo- 
Saxon blood of Colonial times, and these lines 
have all united in him to form a typical New 
Englander. 

In the Assembly he is a member of the Joint 
Standing Committee on Constitutional Amend- 
ments. 




JOSEPH DAVIS GOULDEN 



Joseph Davis Goulden, of Stamford, 
is a native of Fairfield, and was born Sep- 
tember 19, 1859. 

His education was obtained in the 
private and public schools of Fairfield. 

Mr. Goulden was a resident of South 
Manchester for about ten years, having 
taken a very active part in the Harrison 
campaign, being vice-president of the 
Manchester Republican Club at that time. 

He was chairman of the Republican 
Borough Committee in 1893, treasurer ot 



the Citizens' Committee on the 250th 
Anniversary Celebration, beside a member 
of I. O. O. F., F. & A. M. and Past Regent 
of Stamford Council, Royal Arcanum. 

In business life Mr. Goulden is a retail 
druggist. 

He has never before been an aspirant 
for public office, but he brings to the office 
of Representative a practical knowledge of 
affairs that will abl}' fit him for look- 
ing after the interests of his town and 
State. 



158 




STILES JUDSON, Jr. 



Stiles Judson, Jr., of Stratford, was 
born at Stratford, February 13, 1862. His 
ancestry on both sides of the family goes 
back to the first settlers of Connecticut, 
William Judson having been the first settler 
in Stratford in 1638. Mr. Judson graduated 
from the Yale Law School in 1885 and has 
ever since been actively engaged in the 
practice of the law. He is a member of 
the law firm of Canfield & Judson, whose 
offices are at Bridgeport, and is one of the 
leading members of the bar of Fairfield 
county. Mr. Judson for several years has 
been prominently identified with the Re- 
publican State politics and has alwa3-s 



been an active worker in the party. He 
represented the town of Stratford in the 
General Assembly of i8gi and was House 
Chairman of the Judiciary Committee, and 
was one of the leaders on the floor of the 
House throughout the memorable dead- 
lock session. In 1892 he was nominated 
by the Republican part}' for Secretary of 
State. Mr. Judson is one of the officers of 
the Republican State League, and has often 
been called upon to address political assem- 
blages. He is a member of the Judiciary 
Committee and House Chairman of the 
Joint Select Committee on Constitutional 
Amendments of the General Assembly. 




HENRY B. WHEELER 



Henry B. Wheeler, of Weston, is 63 
3-ears old, and was born in Easton, or what 
was originally W^eston. He was educated 
in the common schools, and Easton 
Academ)'. From school he entered a 
foundry and learned his trade, buying out 



the business in 1873, since which time he 
has carried it on, making a specialty of 
plows, harrows and irons for hatter's tools. 
He has been a Selectman for three terms 
in succession. Mr. Wheeler has always 
been a Republican. 



160 




RUFUS WAKEMAN 



RuFUS Wakeman, representative of the 
town of Westport, was born in Westport, 
April 2, 1843, of Puritan stock, his father 
being a descendant of the old Massachusetts 
colonists, and was one of the largest land- 
owners of Fairfield County. Mr. Wakeman 
attended the public schools and the Westport 
academy until he was 16 years old, when he 
became a clerk in a general store in Saugatuck. 

In July, 1862, he enlisted in the Seventeenth 
Regiment, C. V., for a three years' service. 
He served as a non-commissioned officer for 
exactly three years without a furlough. He 
was at the battle of Gettysburg from the boom 
of the first gun until the battle was ended. 
After the war he returned to Saugatuck where 



he kept a general store for sixteen years, and 
was very successful. Disposing of his business, 
he, a few months later, went into the manu- 
facturing business, making mattresses, church 
and chair cushions, and also deals in real estate. 
In public life he has been elected a Selectman 
of Westport five times; president and director 
of the Board of Trade, and has always been a 
Republican. He is writing his reminiscences of 
the Civil War, and the papers are read from 
time to time before the Westport Historical 
Society. In church matters he has always 
taken a prominent and active part. 

On Sept. 12, 1867, Mr. Wakeman married 
Miss Frances Fairchild, of Westport. They 
have one son living, Austin. 



EucJKNE C. Di.Mi'SEY was born in Barkhamsted, 
Conn., thirty years ago, and was educated in the public 
schools of Winsted, and also received an academic 
education. He read law in the office of Frederick A. 
Jewell, of New Hartford, and was admitted to the 
Litchfield County bar in 1886. He is a Democrat, but 
has never previously held any public office. 

Lkvvis E. Orton was born in Patterson, N. Y., on 
December 3, 1856. He received a common-school 
education, and learned the trade of a hatter when a 
young man. He has met with a full share of success 
in life and has ever been active in the affairs of Dan- 
bury, as well as in the affairs of the hatting trade. Mr. 
Orton was elected as a Populist, and enjoys the dis- 
tinction of being the only representative of that party 
in the Legislature. 

Jamks Lee, of Brookfield, is 42 years old, having 
been born in Boston, Mass., February 23, 1852. 
He received a common-school education, and, as he 
remarks himself, " have held all the town offices." 
He is at present a constable, and is engaged in farm- 
ing and is a commission merchant in milk. He is a 
Democrat. 

Conrad Buckingham was born in Germany forty 
years ago. He is, and has been for several years, a 
selectman. For over twenty years he was engaged in 
manufacturing, but retired to a farm, the working of 
which he now superintends. He is a Republican. 

George William Ogden was born in New Canaan 
thirty-two years ago. He was graduated from Colum- 
bia College, New York, in 1884. He has been secretary 
of the board of school visitors, registrar of electors, 
and a grand juror of the town. The former two posi- 
tions he now holds. He is at present engaged in teach- 
ing, and also manages his farm. He is a Republican. 

Patrick Campbell was born in Ireland, fifty-three 
years ago. His education was obtained in the common 
schools, and for a number of years he has been in the 
feed business. In politics Mr. Campbell is a Demo- 
crat. 

Samuel Amhrose Blackman was born in Brookfield 
forty-four years ago. His education was obtained in 
the common schools of that town. He has filled many 
local offices and was a member of the lower house of 
the Connecticut Legislature in 1883. For a number of 
years he was engaged in the manufacture of hats, but 
now conducts a hotel. He is a Democrat. 



Andrew F. Jones was born in 1S40 and is therefore 
in his fifty-fourth year. Mr. Jones' general business 
has been railroading and bookkeeping, but is now town 
clerk. He has had considerable legislative experience, 
having been in the House in i88g, 1891 and 1893, while 
his war record is also a long one, he having served four 
years as lieutenant in the Tenth Connecticut Volun- 
teers. Mr. Jones is a Republican. 

L. WooLSEV Randle is 35 years of age, having 
been born in Milton, Conn., in 1S59. He was 
educated in the public schools, and at Olmstead's 
Wilton Academy. For several years he was engaged 
in the mercantile business in Redding Centre, but 
for the past four years has held a responsible posi- 
tion with the Clover Farm Creamery Company. His 
thorough knowledge of the creamery business in all its 
details will make him a prominent legislator in what- 
ever may pertain to that rapidly growing branch of 
Connecticut industries. He is a Republican. 

Howard Parker Mansfield, M.D., was born in 
Brookfield, Conn., October 27, 1863, and will be one of 
the youngest members of the present house. After 
studying in the common schools and the Brookfield 
Academy, Dr. Mansfield attended the Long Island Col- 
lege Hospital, where he was graduated in March, 1893, 
and has since then been practicing as a physician. He 
has been chairman of the town committee, registrar, 
assessor and school visitor, and is now a member of the 
board of education. In 1889 Dr. Mansfield was a mes- 
senger of the House, so legislation will be fam.iliar to 
him. He is a Republican. 

Frank Hungerford was born in New Milford, Octo- 
ber 14, 1846. He was educated in the common schools 
of Connecticut and Illinois. He taught school for 
fifteen years, but is now a farmer. He has held the 
offices of chairman of the school board, town assessor, 
board of relief, and grand juror, always as a Republi- 
can. 

Horace Lewis Fairciiild was born in Trumbull in 
1835, and is at present 59 years of age. Mr. Fairchild 
is a graduate of Yale University, having graduated in 
i860. He has for several years been a school visitor 
and has held many minor local offices, but has never 
had any legislative experience. His business is that of 
a paper manufacturer, and he has been for fifteen 
years a director in the First National Bank of Bridge- 
port. During this session of the Legislature Mr. Fair- 
child will act with the Republicans. 



162 




FRANK MILTON WILSON 



First Representative from Windham, was 
born in Mansfield, Conn., Marcli 20, 1849. His 
paternal ancestry came from Scotland, and were 
the establishers of the paper manufacturing 
industry in the United States. His mother's 
family, Metcalf-Jewett, were amongst the sturdy 
yeomanry of New England, and did valiant 
service in the French and Indian Wars and in 
the War of the Revolution. His grandfather, 
William Metcalf, was kept so continuously in 
office by his fellow-townsmen, that he earned 
the cognomen of the "P'ather of the town of 
Mansfield." 

Mr. Wilson received a grammar and high 
school education. His politics is Republican. 
His business has always been that of a drug- 
gist. He has been president of the Connecti- 



cut Pharmaceutical Association, and he has 
frequently been nominated by the Association 
to the Governor of Connecticut for Pharmacy 
Commissioner. Mr. Wilson has always enjoyed 
the confidence and esteem of his townsmen and 
has occupied many offices of trust and responsi- 
bility, serving three years in the Court of 
Burgesses of the old borough of Willimantic, 
three years on the High School Committee and 
two years as chairman of the Board of Select- 
men. He is a liberal supporter of the Con- 
gregational Church, and has served several 
years as chairman of the Society's Committee. 
Mr. Wilson is a director in several of Willi- 
mantic's industries. This is his first legislative 
experience. He has proved a valuable member 
of the Committee on Cities and Boroughs. 




ANDREW JACKSON BOWEN 



Andrew Jackson Bowen, of Windham, 
was born in Eastford, Conn., April i6, 
1845. His ancestors came to this country 
in 1640, and Oliver Bowen distinguished 
himself in the War of the Revolution. His 
father, Oliver Bowen, was a successful 
business man in the town of Eastford. 

Having received a common-school 
education, he taught school a few terms, 
afterward engaging in mercantile pur- 
suits in his native town at the age of 21, 
meeting with satisfactory results. He was 
Postmaster of Eastford for five years, and 
a member of the Legislature in 1 880, serving 
on the Committee on Incorporations. After 
studying law he moved to Willimantic in 
1 88 1, and was admitted to the bar in the 
same year. He is largely interested in 
local affairs. He became identified with 
the Morrison Machine Company (as treas- 
urer;, at a time when that company was 
financially embarrassed. His efforts to 



carry it through successfully were appar- 
ently assured when an adverse decision of 
a pending patent suit ended in a collapse 
of the compan)^ 

He helped to organize and was with the 
first to invest in the Natchaug Silk Com- 
pany of Willimantic, a well-known cor- 
poration, aspiring to be as extensively 
known as the Willimantic Linen Co. In 
the present Legislature Mr. Bowen is a 
member of the Judiciary Committee, also 
Chairman of the Committee on Joint Rules. 
A joint rule has been introduced by him 
requiring committees to meet and or- 
ganize within one week from their appoint- 
ment. 

He has the honor of being appointed by 
the present Legislature the first Judge of 
the Police Court of the City of Williman- 
tic. Mr. Bowen is senior counsel in a case 
involving about $100,000, now pending in 
the Supreme Court of Florida. 



164 




WILLIAM R. BARBER 



William R. Barber, of Putnam, was 
born in Thompson, Conn., May 8, 1850, 
being the iirst child of Joseph R. and 
Judith (Perry) Barber. At the age of 3 
he removed to Oxford, where ior four 
years his father had charge of the town 
farm. In 1857 the family moved to Wood- 
stock, where his education was brought to 
completion at the historic academy, fitting 
himself there for the successful teacher he 
afterward became. Thompson, Wood- 
Stock, East ford and Putnam were the scenes 
of his educational labors, taking the prin- 
cipalship of the Fifth District Graded 
Grammar School in the latter town after 
six years of gratifying work in the other 
places. While in Woodstock he held the 
office of Secretary, Treasurer and Trustee 
of his Alma Mater, the Academy offices he 
has continued to fill up to the present 
time — over eleven consecutive years. His 
political career in Woodstock is limited to 
serving his townsmen a number of terms 
as Game Warden, a position which it is 
needless to say is something of a sinecure. 
He was also Superintendent of the West 
Woodstock Congregational Sunday-school 
for about six years. Moving, as we have 
said, to Putnam in 1880, his four years in 
the grammar school were spent to the sat- 
isfaction of all concerned. Active business 
life, however, attracted him from the 
schoolroom, and when the Putnam Foun- 
dry and Machine Corporation was formed 
in 1884, he was one of its original stock- 
holders, serving also as secretary and treas- 
urer of the organization. After a year of 
service he was appointed to the position 



of manager, and later on he was honored 
with the office of supermtendent. Here 
Mr. Barber's executive ability at once 
manifested itself, and it is not too much to 
say that no small portion of the success 
the corporation has attained is due to his 
efficient, enterprising, yet conservative 
managemeni. In town affairs he has al- 
ways been keenly interested, having been 
for two years a member of the Republican 
Town Committee and its present Chair- 
man. He has just been elected Represen- 
tative from Putnam, and will " win his 
spurs " as a legislator in the session of 1894 
and 1895, his colleague being E. M. War- 
ner, Esq. Mr. Barber was married No- 
vember 14, 1894, to Mary Louise, daughter 
of Carlo and Sarah (Child) May, of East 
Woodstock, and the newly married couple 
will reside in a pleasant house, just erected 
by Mr. Barber, on School street. He is a 
member of the present Town School Board 
and one of the acting School Visitors. For 
several years he was Foreman of Hose 
Company No. 3, the department later rais- 
ing him to the position of Second Asst. 
Engineer. As a "joiner," Mr. Barber doubt- 
less holds the record, as he is a member of 
the Odd Fellows, Masons, Golden Cross, 
Royal Arcanum and Knights of Pythias, 
holding responsible offices in nearly all of 
them. As a citizen of Putnam he is deeply 
interested in its future, and his position at 
the head of one of its successful corporations 
renders his counsel of value in all that per- 
tains to its growth and welfare. As a suc- 
cessful business man Mr. Barber and the 
foundry are synonymous terms. 



1(55 




EDGAR M. WARNER 



Edgar M. Warner, of Putnam, was 
the youngest of six children born to Earl 
and Adeline (Lester) Warner, his birthplace 
being Worcester, Mass., June i6, 1850. He 
was educated in the public and private 
schools of New London, finishing- his 
school days in the Bartlett High School of 
that town. He then taught school for two 
or three years, having in view the study of 
law. To this end he entered the office of 
Hiram Willey, of New London, then Judge 
of the Court of Common Pleas, studying 
later with George Pratt, also one of the 
leading lawyers of Norwich. In 1872 he 
was graduated from the Harvard Law 
School, and was admitted to the New Lon- 
don County bar the same year. He con- 
tinued to practice in Norwich for three 
years, moving later to Central Village, 
where he remained till 1885, when he re- 



moved to Putnam. August 3, 1887, he 
married Jennie E. Carpenter, eldest 
daughter of Probate Judge John A. and 
Marcia (Chandler) Carpenter. Three chil- 
dren have been born to them, Frances Les- 
ter, Gertrude Chandler, and John A. C. 
Warner. In 1889 Mr. Warner purchased a 
house on South Main street, where he now 
resides. He was Clerk of the Connecticut 
General Assembly in ''j'j, '78, '79- ^i^d Clerk 
of the Senate in '80. His Republican 
friends in Putnam have honored him by 
electing him as one of the members of the 
General Assembly for this session, his col- 
league being WiUiam R. Barber. Mr. War- 
ner has also been a member of the School 
Board and one of the Acting Visitors. His 
fraternal affiliations are with the Royal 
Arcanum, the Free Masons, and the Odd 
Fellows. 



IGG 




MERRITT E. GALLUP 



Merritt E. Gallup, of Ashford, was 
born in Mansfield, August 28, 1847. He 
was educated in the public schools. Dur- 
ing the past twenty years he has become 
well and favorably known as a first-class 
contractor and builder. For four 3'ears he 
was located at Waterbury. The handsome 
and model Pritchard block of that city is 
one monument of his handiwork. He has 
built many admirable blocks and resi- 



dences. He is one of the three Democrats 
in the House from Windham County, the 
stronghold of Republicanism. He has 
been a member of the Town Board of 
Relief. 

On ALirch 23, 1870, he married Sarah J. 
Clarke. They have four children — Lena 
^L, Charles F., William H., and Arthur 
yi. Mr. Gallup is a member of the Grange, 
and is an Odd Fellow. 



167 




GEORGE O. BALCH 



George O. Balch, of Ashford, was born 
in Mansfield, September 26, 1855. He 
received his education in the district 
school. He was a merchant for several 
years, but now is engaged as clerk in the 
general store of J. A. Murphy, his father- 
in-law. He has creditably held several 



town offices. In March, 1880, Mr. Balch 
married Abbie M. Murphy. They have 
one son, Robert M. Mr. Balch is a 
member of the Committee on Roads, 
Bridges and Rivers. His uniform geni- 
ality has gained for him man}" a warm 
friend at the capitol. 



I6S 




^fi^ 




GEORGE L. BRADFORD 



George L. Bradford, of Canterbui-y, 
was born in Canterbury August 5, 1865, 
and is the youngest of six children. He 
attended the district school until 17 years 
of age, since which time he has been 
prospered as a farmer and blacksmith. 

The Bradford famil}- is one of the oldest 
in the country. The subject of this sketch 



is the eighth descendant of Governor 
Bradford, who came over in the May- 
flower. He was married January i, 1890, 
to Nella F. Babcock, of Plainfield. They 
have one child, a daughter, Alice N. Mr. 
Bradford is a member of Canterbury 
Grange, No. 76. He is an active Select- 
man of his town, and is a Republican. 



169 





NEWELL CLINTON HUNT 



Newell Clintox Hunt, of Chaplin, 
was born in that town January 3, 1853, the 
eldest child of Henry and Phebe (Curtis) 
Hunt. He received his education in the 
public and select schools of his native town. 
By occupation he is a farmer, and one who 
has always been thoroughly interested in 
his chosen calling. In politics he has alwavs 
been a Republican, and has held the vari- 
ous town offices, being elected tax-collector 
by both parties, and for several years on 



the Board of Education. Mr. Hunt is a 
thoroughly public-spirited citizen, always 
ready to act for the best interests of his 
town and State. 

He was married on December 8, 1875, 
to E. Jessie Robbins, two daughters hav- 
ing come to brighten their home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hunt are members of the 
Congregational Church, and Mr. Hunt has 
been superintendent of the Sabbath School 
for two years past. 



170 



I 




GURDON BRADFORD MARCY 



GuRDON Bradford Marcy, of East- 
ford, was born in the town of Ashford, 
December 22, 1855, and received a com- 
mon-school education. 

At the age of 13 he came to Eastford, 
where he has since resided, with the excep- 
tion of three years, when he was in Massa- 
chusetts. He carries on a blacksmithing 



business, and by first-class work and hon- 
orable dealings has gained a large patron- 
age for miles around. 

He has acceptably held several local 
offices, and in politics is Republican. He 
is a Royal Arch Mason, being a member 
of Putnam Lodge, No. 46, and Putnam 
Chapter, No. 41. 



171 




WILLIAM H. LINCOLN 



William H. Lincoln, of Hampton, was 
born in Ashford November 20, 1835, and 
was educated in the common and select 
schools. He is engaged in farming, and 
has held the offices of Constable, Justice of 
the Peace, and Member of the Board of 
Relief. He has held most of the local 
offices of his town. 

Mr. Lincoln's father, William, was a suc- 
cessful farmer, and a popular member of 



the House in 1871. On November 29, 
1859, he married Emma Wood worth, of 
Hampton. 

They have one daughter, Carrie L.. wife 
of Carll A. Lewis. Mr. Lincoln is treas- 
urer of Little River Grange, No. 36. He 
has one of the best farms in his sec- 
tion, well-known as "The Pearl Farm" 
for generations past. He is a Repub- 
lican. 



172 




FREDERICK A. JACOBS 



Frederick A. Jacobs, of fCillingly, is a 
native of Danielsonville, and was born Oc- 
tober 15, 1855. He is a son of Oliver P- 
and Charlotte (Hill) Jacobs. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools. He com- 
menced his business career as clerk in the 
hardware store of J. P. Chamberlain & Co. 
He occupied the position until the store 
was purchased by E. H. and O. P.Jacobs. 
A line of mill supplies were added. He 
continued with the new firm until the 
hardware business was sold to William O. 
and O. P. Jacobs, and he, in company with 
his brother, E. H., continued in the mill 
supply business under the firm name of E. 
H. Jacobs & Co. The company was in- 
corporated in 1890 with a capital of $50,- 
000 under name of The E. H. Jacobs Man- 
ufacturing Company. F. A. Jacobs has 
been Treasurer of the company since its 
organization. 



Mr. Jacobs has been a director of the 
First National Bank since 1892. He was 
the first President of the Danielsonville 
Board of Trade. 

He was Warden of the borough in 1887. 
He has been President of the Riverview As- 
sociation since its inception, and Treasurer 
of the Westfield Congregational Sunday- 
school the past ten years, also a Deacon of 
the church and a member of the Society 
Committee. 

Mr. Jacobs has been an extensive travel- 
er. He spent the summer of 1892 in Eu- 
rope. On May 3, 1882, he married Clara E., 
daughter of Walter Barber of New Haven. 
They have had five children ; Walter F., 
Alice M., Majorie J., Laura G., and Char- 
lotte C, deceased. Mr. Jacobs is one of 
Danielsonville's foremost enterprising citi- 
zens, and has done much to further the 
borough's advancement. 



173 




ESOUARE BARTLETT MILLER 



EsQUARE Bartlett MiLLER, of KiUinglv, 
was born in Killingly, August 25, 1827, being 
the fourth child of Welcome and Elsie (Bartlett) 
Miller. He was educated in the common 
schools of Killingly, and upon the completion 
of his schooling worked at farming on the 
home place and for others. He married when 
at the age of 19 years Sarah H. Warren, of 
Killingly. Six children were born to them, 
five of whom are still living, the eldest being 
employed in Hartford as assistant foreman of 
the car shops of the N. Y., N. H. & H R. R., 
where he has been continuously for sixteen 
years. The other sons are residents of Kill- 
ingly and engaged in business. 

At the age of 20 years Mr. Miller entered 
the employ of William Burgess as a carpenter 
and joiner, and followed that business for 
about four years, in the employ of various 
parties, when he went into business for himself. 
He followed the trade of carpenter and joiner 
for three or four years, when he entered the 
employ of the firm of S. .It H. Sayles, at Kill- 
ingly, as Master Mechanic and Superintendent 
of Construction. He served the above firm in 
that capacity until the spring of 1866, when he 
entered the employ of Ezekiel Webster, at 
Dayville ; continued in his service for about a 
year, and then accepted the position of Master 
Mechanic and Superintendent of Construction 
for theMechanicsville Company, at Mechanics- 
ville, Conn., serving that firm acceptably for 
about one year. In the election of 1868, Mr. 
Miller was elected a member of the Board of 
Selectmen of Killingly, and by them was 
chosen Clerk of the Board, and continuously. 



elected as Selectman and Clerk of the Board 
for twelve years, vacating that office in 1880. 

During his term of service as Selectman of 
the town, while not engaged in town business, 
he followed his trade of contractor and builder, 
and many private houses in various sections of 
the town were erected by him, as well as many 
more pretentious buildings, among them being 
the church and school house, the mill. No. 3, 
(250 X50 ft., 4 stories), and the Store Building, 
all at Williamsville. 

In 1880, in company with Underwood & 
Boix'en, he contracted with The Quinebaug 
Company, at Danielsonville, for the erection of 
a factory building 495 ft. long 90 ft. wide, also 
a number of tenement houses, the aggregate 
of the contract being about $100,000. 

Since then he has followed his business in 
Killingly. He has served the town in various 
offices beside that of Selectman, serving as 
Justice of Peace for two terms, also serving as 
Constable and District Committee. 

Mr. Miller is a prominent member of the 
A. F. and A. M., the O. U. A. M. and the K. 
of P. He joined the Putnam Lodge, F. and 
A. M. No. 15, at Danielsonville, entered as a 
charter member, and served the lodge as one 
of its first Masters. He is also a member of 
Warren Chapter and Montgomery Council. 

In politics Mr. Miller was a "Douglas Demo- 
crat" before the Rebellion, but since that time 
has been an active and zealous Republican, al- 
ways ready to respond with his time and money 
to his party's call. He was elected a Repre- 
sentative from the town of Killingly in the elec- 
tion of 1894, receiving a majority of 310 votes. 



174 




AMASA PELEG TABER 



Amasa Peleg Taber, of Plainfield, was 
born in Cazenovia, N. Y., December 29, 
1846. 

He received an excellent education in 
the public schools and at the Schofield 
commercial college, where he graduated 
in 1869. He acted as bookkeeper for four 
years, and for a quarter of a century has 
been engaged in general merchandise busi- 
ness. For four years he was postmaster at 
Greene, R. I., and has been a Justice of the 
Peace. He was a private in Battery E. 
First R. I. Light Artillerv, and is an 
honored member of James Kilburn Post, 
No. TJ, G. A. R., of Central Village, 
also a popular member and officer of 
several prominent secret societies, hav- 



ing attained Scottish degrees in Masonry. 
He was married December 29, 1868, to 
Peora F. Jenks, of Foster, R. I. They 
have two children, Irving A., manager of 
his father's store, and Abbie P., who is to 
graduate this year from the East Green- 
wich Academy. 

Mr. Taber has always been regarded as 
a progressive business man, interesting 
himself not only in the affairs of his own 
establishment, but also to be counted upon 
in matters relating to the improvement of 
the town in which he lives. He has an 
immense store, and has built up a large 
and ever-increasing business, which he 
richly deserves. 

He is a strong Republican. 



175 




LUCIUS B. MORGAN 



Lucius B. Morgan, of Plainfield, was 
born in Canterbury, July 19, 1839, ^^^ is a 
son of Elisha A. and Philura Bacon Mor- 
gan. When about fcnir years old his 
parents removed to Plainfield. 

His education was received in the 
schools of his town and at Plainfield Acad- 
emy, then taught by Rev. Lucian Bur- 
leigh. 



Since that time he has lived at his pres- 
ent home and devoted his time largely to 
farming. 

Mr. Morgan is a staunch Republican, 
and his first vote was cast for Abraham 
Lincoln. 

He has faithfully served on the Board of 
Selectmen for four years. He is a mem- 
ber of Plainfield Grange. 



176 




FRANCIS H. BIRD 



Francis H. Bird, of Pomfret, was born 
in Merrimac, Mass., December 13, i860, 
and was educated in the public school of 
that place, graduating from the High 
School. 

He has been engaged in the retail gro- 
cery business, until four years ago, when 
he went into poultry raising. 



Mr. Bird is a member of the Odd Fel- 
lows and Masonic orders, and has served 
three years as Secretary of the Masonic 
Lodge. He is also a member of E. Doug- 
las Lodge, A. O. U. W., and has repre- 
sented that Lodge in the Grand Lodge. 

In politics Mr Bird has always been a 
Republican. 




ALBERT B. SMITH 



Albert B. Smith, of Pomfret, is a native 
of that town, having been born Mav 6, 
1847. He is a farmer and broom manu- 
facturer by occupation. 

Mr. Smith enjoys the perfect confidence 
of his townsmen, as proved by the fact 
that he has acted as Chairman ot the Board 
of Selectmen for several years, and having 
been elected to the Legislature in Novem- 
ber, 1894, by a good majorit}-. As a faith- 
ful, courteous and obliging official he has 
won the respect of all with whom he has 
come in contact. 



Mr. Smith is a veteran of the jlate war, 
serving as a private in Company G, 
Twenty-sixth Connecticut Volunteers, tra- 
versing the entire length of the Missis- 
sippi River. He has been Treasurer of 
the Wolf Den Grange since its organiza- 
tion, and is Warden of Putnam Lodge, F. 
and A. M., Woodstock. As conservator 
and guardian of several persons he has 
gained a creditable reputation. 

In 1879 ^^ married Mary I. Swift, of 
Ashford, one daughter, Marion, having 
blessed their union. 




ENOCH A. DOUGLAS 



Enoch A. Douglas, of Sterling, was 
born in Plainfield April 4, 1853, and 
received a common-school education. He 
has been a Judge of Probate since 1890. 
For the past fifteen years he has been a 
dealer in wool, in which trade he has built 
up an excellent business, due to his giving 
personal attention to his customers' inter- 
ests, and purchasing wool in all the New 



England States and New York State. 
He is a Republican, and was elected 
Representative by an unusuall}- large 
majority. Mr. Douglas was mar- 
ried June 13, 1889, to Mary Mason 
Baker, of Sterling, a graduate of the Nor- 
mal School, Providence, and for several 
years a successful teacher. They have 
one child, Blanche. 



179 






'm^ 




£. HERBERT CORTTIS 



E. Herbert Corttis, of Thompcon, was 
born in Thompson, June lo, 1862. He re- 
ceived a college education, graduating 
from Amherst in 1884. He has creditably 
held the offices of Town Auditor, Tax Col- 
lector and School Visitor, and holds the 
last office now ; he is also County Auditor. 
He is a Republican, and was a member of 
the last House, serving on the Judiciary 
Committee. He is engaged in the bus- 



iness of farming. On August 29, 1894, 
he married Miss Ida A. Stearns, of Dan- 
ielsonville. 

Mr. Corttis is Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Manual and Roll, and Clerk of 
the Committee on Education, filling both 
positions in an able manner. 

His natural ability and faithfulness are 
appreciated by his townsmen, as shown by 
the continued honors showered upon him. 



180 




GEORGE T. BIXBY 



George T. Bixby, of Thompson, is a 
native of that town, and was born March 
7, 1837. He was educated in the pubUc 
schools and Nichold's Academy. He has 
held nearly every office in the gift of the 
town, and has been a popular president 
of the Woodstock Agricultural Society. 



He represented his town in the Legislature 
of 1892, being a prominent Republican 
member. Mr. Bixby is a director in the 
First National Bank of Putnam, and is 
engaged in farming. His only son, Halsey 
Greene, died March 3, 1895, and was a 
promising student in Amherst College. ^ 



181 




FRANK R. JACKSON 



Frank. R. Jackson, of Woodstock, was 
born in Woodstock, (October 17, 1853, 
and received his education in the district 
and select schools. He is a successful 
farmer. 

He is widely known as a popular and 
active Republican. His county has hon- 
ored him by electing him messenger in the 



House in the Legislatures of 1886, 1891 and 
1893. He has \ erv acceptably held the town 
office of Constable, and is now a registrar 
and a grand juror. On December 23, 
1876, he married Julia Putnam, of North 
Ashford. He is a member of the Crystal 
Lake Grange, Eastford and is a Mason. 
He serves on the Railroad Committee. 



182 




DAVID T. GOODWIN 



David T. Goodwin, of Woodstock, was 
born in the town of Londonderry, N. H., 
fifty-five years ago, of English parentage, 
and was brought up on a farm. He re- 
ceived a common-school education, and 
graduated in 1863 at Eastman's Com- 
mercial College. He enlisted in a 
" crack " regiment, Company C, Fourth 
Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, and served 
in the Army of the Potomac during the 
continuance of the war. In December, 
1865, he married and went West, residing 
a number of years in the State of Minne- 
sota, where he was a merchant and where 
he held town and county offices. He re- 
turned East with his family, and in 1878 
assumed the position of Superintendent of 
Roseland Park, which at that time was 
only in its initial stage, and for seventeen 



years he has prepared for the reception ot 
the most distinguished visitors of our own 
country, as well as from abroad, to the 
renowned annual Fourth of July celebra- 
tions. Mr. Goodwin is an active member 
of the Congregational Church of Wood- 
stock, and a Trustee of Woodstock 
Academy. He was for a number of years 
Secretary ot the Young Republican Club 
of Woodstock, is one of the charter mem- 
bers of Woodstock Lodge, No. 42, A. O. 
U. W., and for nearly three years its sec- 
retary, when he was called to the chair, 
and later represented his lodge at the 
Grand Lodge ; he has also for many years 
served as Secretary of Putnam Lodge, No. 
46, F. and A. M. He has for a number of 
terms held the office of Justice of the 
Peace. 



183 



Frank Day is a native of Brookl\n, 4S years old. 
He was educated in the common schools and the West 
Killingly Academ}'. His business is farming, and he 
has been prominent in local affairs, being now a secre- 
tary of the school board, an assessor and registrar. He 
has been president and secretary of the Windham 
County Agricultural Society and a member of the State 
Board of Agriculture. He was a member of the House 
of 1889 and is a Republican. 

John Owen Smith is a native of Canterbury, and 
54 years of age. After receiving a common and select 



school education he taught school for some time, hav- 
ing graduated from the State Normal School at New 
Britain, in 1S65. He studied medicine, and graduated 
from the New York Eclectic Medical College in 1S82. 
He is superintendent of the public schools of Canter- 
bury, and town health officer. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

Frank W. Bacon is one of the Windham Democratic 
members, and was born in Monson, Mass., forty \'ears 
ago. He is a blacksmith by trade. 



184 




WILLIAM T. MARSH 



William T. Marsh, of Litchfield, is 
one of the Democratic minority. He is 
45 years old, born in Litchfield in 1849. 
He received a common-school education, 
and remained in his native town. He has 
conducted for many years a coal and lum- 
ber business. He has been prominent in 
town affairs, having been a member of the 
Board of Burgesses, warden of the bor- 



ovigh. Registrar, and held other town 
offices. He is at present a member of the 
Board of Relief. He has long been a 
director in the savings bank at Litchfield. 
Mr. Marsh was a member of the famous 
"dead-lock " session of the State Assembly, 
and was a member of the House Committee 
on Rules. He was re-elected two years ago, 
making this his third consecutive term. 



185 




WELLINGTON BROWN SMITH 



Wellington Brown Smith, of Win- 
chester, is a member of the well-known 
law firm of Smith & Munn, of 345 Main 
street, West Winsted. His partner is 
Frank B. Munn. Mr. Smith was born 
June 3, 1856, and is 38 years of age. He 
was admitted to practice law in this State 
in 1877, ^"d settled where he still lives. 
He has a large civil and criminal practice. 
He has never married. His lather is in 
business in New Hartford with his son 
George W. Smith, who is senator from the 
eighteenth district, under the firm name of 
D. B. Smith & Son, manufacturers of cot- 
ton duck. The familv originally tame 
from Haddam, his grandmother on his 
father's side being a Brainard. Mr. 
Smith's mother was a Virginian of the 



Brown lineage. He has alwavs been a 
Republican. 

He is a man ot keen, intuitive percep- 
tions, in itself a valuable adjunct for a 
legislator, and also blessed, in large meas- 
ure, with that useful commodity character- 
ized by one of our Supreme Court as 
" sound horse sense." He is a true friend, 
and a hard fighter for his idea of right. 
He is not tinctured with any of the isms 
of the day, nor is he afraid to change his 
views, if honest argument, backed by 
facts, prove him to have been wrong. 

With a Legislature composed of just 
such men, there would be no reason for a 
" Corrupt Practices Act." 

He is a hard' and faithful worker for his 
party. 



186 




JAY E. SPAULDING 



Jay E. Spaulding, Representative from the 
town of Winchester, Litchfield County, was 
born in Northampton, N. Y., August 15, 1846, 
is 48 years old. He came to Winsted in 1866, 
and has resided there ever since, with the ex- 
ception of two years that he was in the Old 
National Bank of Grand Rapids, Mich. He 
began in Winsted as a clerk in the hardware 
business and afterward was in company with 
J. J. Whiting and S. F. Dickerman in that 
business. 

After retiring from that business he went to 
Grand Rapids, Mich., and on his return to 
Winsted took an interest with John G. Wet- 
more in the New England Pin Company, hav- 
ing now been connected with that company 
for twenty-two years; first as office man and 
secretary, for the past ten years the general 
manager of the company. It is one of the 
oldest and most reliable companies in the town. 



He is also president of the Morgan Silver 
Plate Company, manufacturers of coffin hard- 
ware, is a stockholder in several companies and 
a director in quite a number, being looked upon 
as one of Winsted's most able business men. 

In politics he is an energetic Republican 
and has served the borough of Winsted a long 
term, both as warden and burgess; has been 
treasurer of the town of Winchester for five 
years and holds the office now. 

Mr. Spaulding has been prominent in the 
fire department, one of the vice-presidents in 
the State Association, a trustee of Memorial 
Park and Soldiers' Monument Association and 
is on the committee of the water improve- 
ment and tunneling the mountain, beside be- 
ing agent of the estate of J. G. Wetmore. 

He is a member of Committee on Incor- 
porations and Clerk of Litchfield County 
Representatives. 



187 




CHARLES E. FORD 



Charles E. Ford, of Canaan, is 
another young member of the House. 
He is only 3 1 years of age, born at Falls 
Village, November 27, 1863. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools and received 
a mercantile training at Eastman's business 
college, Poughkeepsie. He is a popular 
young man, and has the hearty good-will 



of Democrats as well as Republicans. He 
is a registrar of voters, an office which he 
has held some time. He is engaged in 
the drug business. In politics he is a 
Republican. He is a party worker, and 
his efficient services have won him a seat 
at the capitol. This is his first acquaint- 
ance with the legislative halls. 



188 




i sp mi 





GEORGE W. RExMINGTON 



George W. Remington, of Colebrook, 
was born in Meredith, Delaware County, 
N. Y., July i6, 1842. He received a com- 
mon-school education and attended after- 
ward the Delaware Literary Institute at 
Franklin, N. Y., one of the best academies 
in the Empire State at that time, and later 
at Cincinnatus Academy, Cortland County, 
N. Y. He is a Baptist minister, and has 
been in Colebrook seven years, going there 
from Chenango County, New York, to 
take the pastorate of the North and South 



Colebrook churches. His first experience 
in the Nutmeg State was during the bliz- 
zard of 1888. He has always felt an inter- 
est in political affairs and in the cause of 
temperance. He was a delegate from 
Colebrook to the State convention held in 
Hartford last October. He has twice been 
elected acting school visitor, secretary of 
the School Board and a member of the 
committee to examine teachers. He is a 
loyal Republican, and this is his first term 
in the State Legislature. 



% 




FREDERICK W. YUTZLER 



Frederick W. Yutzler, of Cornwall, is 
a native of Germany, and is 41 years ot 
age. He was born at Oppenheim, July 15, 
1853. He was educated in the district 
school ; he is a barber ; he has been Con- 



stable and Justice of the Peace, but at 
present holds no town offices. He has not 
been a State legislator before. He will 
act with the Democratic party at the com- 
ing session. 



190 




ANDREW M. CLARK 



Andrew M. Clark, of Cornwall, was born 
and has always lived in that town. The date 
of his birth was June 19, 1857. He received 
his education in the district school and Corn- 
wall select school. He is engaged in dairy 
farming, to which business he gives his close 
personal attention, and being known as a hard- 
working, progressive young man, who has the 
confidence and esteem of all his fellow-citizens. 
He was elected because of this confidence in 
him and the belief that he would conscientiously 
and capably look after Cornwall's interests in 
the Legislature, beside taking a decided stand 
in all State matters. He has been director in 
the Mohawk Tower Corporation, and trustee 
in the Methodist Church for a number of years. 
Mr. Clark is a loyal Republican, being the first 
representative of that party elected from his 
town since 1886. His family history is one of 
the most interesting in Connecticut, the George 
Clark family, from which he is descended. 



having come from England to Milford, Conn., 
during Charles I.'s persecution of the Puritan 
ministers. 

Sarah, daughter of George Clark, was the 
mother of Gov. Jonathan Law, born in 1674, 
and elected Governor of the Colony of Con- 
necticut in 1 741 and annually until his death, 
in 1750. Abraham Clark, one of the signers 
of the Declaration of Independence, was from 
Milford, and was connected with this branch of 
the Clark family, old papers in the possession of 
Sheldon Clark being in accord with that fact. 

Barber's History of Connecticut says : 
"George Clark, of Milford, with seven others, 
bought the township of Willington in the year 
1720." 

George Clark, sixth, was a revolutionary 
soldier, enlisting at Cambridge in 1775. His 
grandsons, Elizur and William Alanson, were 
the originators of the Clark matches, probably 
the first friction matches known. 



101 




HENRY HOPKINS CATLIN 



Henry Hopkins Catlin, of Harwin- 
ton, represents his native town, where 
he was born November 2, 1841. Having 
grown up among the people, and in the 
vocation of a farmer attained and held the 
esteem of his fellow-citizens, his long ex- 
perience during a life of fift3'-three years 
makes him amply fitted to honor the town 
of Harwinton. He was educated in the 



common school and academy. He has not 
been elected previously to any office, na- 
tional, State, or local or corporate, nor has 
he been a member of the House. He is a 
steadfast Republican, and will be found 
ready to support Republican endeavors. 
He is an old soldier, having had an honor- 
able service as a private in Company A, 
Second Connecticut Heavy Artiller}-. 



132 




BENJAMIN F. PAGE 



Benjamin F. Page, of Harwinton, is 57 
years old, born in Warren, October 24, 
1837. He was educated in the common 
schools and spent some time at Eagle Acad- 
emy in Goshen. When a young man he 
enlisted in Company E, Eighth Connecti- 
cut Volunteers, September 25, 1861. He 
served with ability and re-enlisted Decem- 
ber 23, 1863, as a veteran in the field. He 
served with distinction through the war 



and was honorably discharged May 31, 
1865, with the rank of Sergeant. He was 
wounded at Fort Harrison, October i, 1864. 
Returning home, he settled in Harwinton. 
He has held the office of Constable for a 
series of years, and was elected Justice at 
the November election. He is a farmer. 
Always sustaining the flag for which he 
fought, he has labored in the Republican 
ranks. 



193 




GEORGE THEODORE JOHNSON 



George Theodore Johnson, of Nor- 
folk, who has been honored with the title 
ot Representative, was born in Watertown, 
June 29, 1854. He removed to Norfolk 
several years ago and engaged in the drug 
business. He received his education in 
the common schools, after which he at- 



tended a grammar school in New Haven. 
He has not heretofore held an)^ office, but 
has paid strict attention to his business. 
He is a well-known apothecary. This is 
his first insight into the duties of a legisla- 
tor. He is a Republican, and will be found a 
zealous supporter of the partv in the House. 



194 




ALBERTO T. RORABACK 



Alberto T. Roraback, who represents 
the town of North Canaan, was born in 
Sheffield, Mass., in 1849. The years of his 
boyhood and early youth were spent on 
his father's farm in the town of his birth. 
His education, begun in the public schools 
of the town, was supplemented by a 
course at South Berkshire Institute, New 
Marlboro, Mass., and at Genesee Seminary 
in New York State. In 1870 he began the 
study of law with Judge Dcjnald J. War- 
ner in Salisbury, and was admitted to the 
bar from his office in 1872. Since that 
time he has enjoyed a lucrative and in- 
creasing practice, and has for some years 
been regarded as one of the leaders of the 
bar in the western part of the State. From 



1889 to 1893 as Judge of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for Litchfield County he made 
an enviable judicial record, no decision of 
his having been reported as overruled by 
the Supreme Court. During the whole of 
his active life the judge has been an en- 
thusiast in politics, taking an active part in 
the councils of his party. At present he 
represents the Nineteenth District on the 
Republican State Central Committee, and 
has held the same position in former 
years. 

As a member of the House he has made 
a place for himself among the leaders, 
serving as clerk of the committee on 
the Judiciary, and chairman of the 
committee on Sale of Lands. 



195 




HUBERT WILLIAMS 



Hubert Williams, of Salisbury, is forty- 
one years of age, and was born in Lake- 
ville September lo, 1853. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools and completed 
his preparation for the practice of law by 
graduating from Columbia Law School in 
1873. He has since been engaged in the 
duties of a law office, and given con- 



siderable attention to manufacturing. He 
has held the office of Selectman and has 
been a member of the Board of School 
Visitors. He is ver)- popular, and as an 
aggressive, sterling Republican has made 
a record to be proud of He will be found 
an earnest advocate of Republican measures 
at this session. 



196 




<? 



Kn^ 






f 



LAWRENCE VAN ALSTYNE 



Lawrence Van Alstyne, ot Sharon, 
Conn., was born in the town of Amenia, 
Dutchess County, New York, August 2, 
1839, ^^''^s educated in the common schools, 
learned the trade of iron molding, which 
he abandoned for that of carpenter and 
builder, making the latter the chief occupa- 
tion of his life. 

Mr. Van Alstyne was one of the first to 
respond to President Lincoln's call for 
300,000 volunteers, enlisted in Company 
B, 128th Regiment, N. Y. S. Volunteers, 
and participated in many of the principal 
battles of the war. Sergeant Van Alstyne 
did special service in recruiting colored 
men for the army, often inside of the 
enemy's lines — particularly hazardous 
work. Mr. Van Alstyne was married soon 



after the war and settled in Sharon, Conn., 
where he has since resided. 

He has one child, Elizabeth, who can 
trace her descent, on her father's side, from 
Lambert Van Alstyne, one of the original 
settlers of Kinderhook, N. Y., 1650, and on 
her mother's side from Bigot Eggleston, 
who came from England to Dorchester, 
Mass., in 1630, and who died in Windsor, 
Conn., 1674, aged nearly one hundred 
years. 

Mr. Van Alstyne is a Republican. He 
is a member of the Holland Society of 
New York, of Hamilton Lodge, No. 54, 
F. and A. M., is Adjutant of J. M. Gregory 
Post 59, G. A. R., Department of Connecti- 
cut, and is a life member of the Connecti- 
cut Historical Society. 



197 




WILLARD A. RORABACK 



WiLLARD A. RORABACK, of Torringtoii, 
was born in New Marlboro, Mass., March 
12. i860, his parents having moved there 
from Columbia county, N. Y. In his brief 
life he has held many offices. He was 
educated in the common schools, gradu- 
ating from the Canaan, Conn., high school. 
He studied law, and was admitted to 
the Litchfield county bar in June 1883. He 
pursued his law studies and graduated 
from the office of his cousin, Ex-Judge A. 
T. Roraback, of Canaan. He was Tax Col- 
lector for the town of Torrington three 
years. He has been Justice of the Peace 
for ten vears, and chairman of the Repub- 
lican Town Committee since 1886. He is 



serving his fifth term as Town Clerk and 
Borough Clerk. He has filled all these 
offices with ability, and is held in high 
esteem by his fellow-townsmen. 

He has always been a Republican and 
has done a great deal of work for the 
party. He has not been a member of the 
Legislature before. Mr. Roraback is 
Clerk of the Committee on Finance and a 
member of the Committees on Contested 
Elections and Putnam County Memorial 
Camp. 

His family history is very interest- 
ing, his paternal grandmother being a 
Scott, and tracing her ancestry to Sir 
Walter Scott. 



198 




GEORGE CARTER HOPKINS 



George Carter Hopkins, of Warren, 
is a native and life-long resident of the 
town that he represents, and one of its 
best-known and leading citizens. He was 
born there Jan. i6, 1837, son of Deacon Will- 
iam Hopkins, who was also one of the prom- 
inent men of the community. Representative 
George C. Hopkins began his education in the 
common schools at home and subsequently 
studied at Dexter's Seminary in Rochester, 
N. Y. He has for years occupied a position 
of influence in his town and neighborhood, and 
is a member of the Board of Selectmen, of the 
district school committee, and of the commit- 
tee of the Ecclesiastical Society and also of the 
Congregational Church. He has always been a 
Republican and in 1894 was elected to the Legis- 
lature by a very large majority in a town which 
two years before went heavily Democratic. 

Mr. Hopkins owns a very large farm, some 
450 acres, and his home is one of the most 
attractive places in beautiful Litchfield County. 
It stands on high land on the north side of 
Lake Waramaug, under Mt. Waramaug, and 



the view from certain elevated parts of his 
lands has been pronounced by Dr. Horace 
Bushnell one of the choicest to be found. Mr. 
Hopkins has two large houses, and it is his 
custom, as it was his father's before him, 
to entertain summer guests. His present 
houses, after the present enlargements are 
completed, will accommodate about one hun- 
dred persons. The roll of those who have 
spent their summers there would include a 
noteworthy array of names, headed by the Rev. 
Dr. Horace Bushnell, who was there for a dozen 
seasons in succession. The pure air, the beau- 
tiful walks and drives, the boating and fishing 
on the lake, and the social attractions of the 
house delight all who have experience of this 
hospitable place. Mr. Hopkins has, of course, 
a large amount of live stock of various sorts 
upon his farm, raises fine horses, and manages 
his large estate with marked ability. 

Mrs. Hopkins was formerly Miss Louise 
Lemmon, of New Preston (Washington), and 
they have three children — William L., Howard 
C. and Mvron P. 



199 










SAMUEL CLAYTON KINGMAN 



Samuel Clayton Kincjman, of Washington, 
was born in Wakefield, Mass., May 15, 1830, 
and graduated at the high school as valedic- 
torian. 

He served his time as a machinist and tool- 
maker at Lawrence, Mass. In '1852 he en- 
gaged with the Wheeler iK: Wilson Sewing Ma- 
chine Co., of Watertown, Conn., and has been 
with the company since that time as master 
machinist and contractor. He is one of the 
oldest sewing machine needle makers in the 
country, and his patents for improved ma- 
chinery are many. November 17, 1853, he 
married Miss Emily Eustis Brooks, of King- 
field, Me., at East Haverhill, Mass., and they 
have five daughters: Ella Pamelia, born in 
Watertown, Conn., now Mrs. Horace L. 
Eames, of Bridgeport; Mary Hills, borr in 
Watertown, now Mrs. Frank S. Buckingham, 
of Washington ; Katie Brooks, born in Bridge- 
port, now Mrs. Edward W. Buckingham, of 
Bridgeport; Carrie Emily, born in Bridgeport, 
now Mrs. Hiram B. Loomis, of Hartford, and 
Evelyn Clayton, born in Bridgeport, and at 
present a resident of Washington. The sub- 
ject of this sketch was an active Republican 
during the War of the Rebellion, and serving 



in the Christian Commission was often at the 
front as an agent for the distribution of the 
soldiers' fund. His military record, like his 
father's, is above the average. He served in 
Company B, Light Artillery, until its disband- 
ment, and enlisting in Company B, Fourth 
Regiment, was promoted to Inspector of Rifle 
Practice of the regiment in 1876, and to Brig- 
ade Inspector in 1890. 

He has held many offices of trust, as coun- 
cilman, grand juror, police commissioner, one 
of the school committee, and for some years 
was treasurer of the Bridgeport Hospital. In 
1890 he built a home in Washington, Conn., 
where he has since resided. He still takes an 
active part in public affairs, serving as justice 
of the peace, notary public, sealer of public 
weights and measures, member of the board 
of education, and game warden. He is ex- 
pert with the rifle and his hobby is guns and 
rifles, his collection of them being quite noted, 
as is his collection of old coins and curiosities. 
Many of his rare books he has lately given to 
libraries in this State and Massachusetts, and 
still has a large number left at his home at 
Washington, on the banks of the Shepang 
River. 



300 



:;:.---<,'i«r,;.. 




HENRY T. DAYTON 



Henry T. Dayton, of Watertown, was 
born in the town that he represents fifty- 
three years ago, January 22, 1842. He 
received a common schocjl and acade- 
mic education ; he has been one of the 
most prominent men of the town for years ; 
he has always been engaged in farming, 
but is now retired from active work ; he is 
at present Trial Justice: his Christian char- 
acter has always been marked for its thor- 
ough uprightness ; he is Senior Deacon in 
the Congregational Church and is clerk of 
the church ; his interest in agricultural 
matters has always made him foremost in 
grange work and he is Master of Water- 
town Grange, No. 122, and Lecturer ol 
Pomona Grange, No. 7, as well as other- 
wise allied with the interests of the Order; 



he was a member of the Board of Select- 
men for eight years and for four years he 
was Chairman of the Board ; he was Col- 
lector of Taxes seven years and Constable 
as many more ; he was for some time Chair- 
man of the School Committee; he was the 
first Master of Excelsior Grange, No. 7. 
Mr. Dayton was also one of the incor- 
porators of the Watertown Savings Bank, 
and has been a director and appraiser since 
its formation. He was also one of the 
hardest workers in the movement to 
obtain a new town hall. For ten years 
he was treasurer of the church and he has 
held various other offices ; he is a loyal 
Republican, but with a conscientious 
sense of duty to his State, his town and 
his tamilv. 



201 



George H. WHiTNtY is the second representative. 
He has been postmaster at Riverton for five years. He 
was born at Barkhamsted and is 32 years old. He is a 
Republican and a merchant. 

Andkkw M. Booth is a young man of 38 years. He 
claims New Milford as his native place, where he was 
born April 14, 1856. He was educated in the common 
schools. He has not been a State legislator before. 
He is at present grand juror, an office to which he was 
rei-lected. He has been engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness. Although young he has shown himself to be an 
active business man. He will be found on the Demo- 
cratic side 

Akel C. Everett was born in Sharcjn but has long 
been a resident of Barkhamsted. He was educated in 
the common schools, not having the opportunity to 
attend college. He has not held any offices heretofore. 
He has followed agricultural pursuits all his life and 
has become a well-to-do-farmer. He is highly esteemed 
by the residents of the town in the Litchfield hills. 
This is his first experience at the capitol and he is one 
of the great Republican majority. 

Cl.wio.n H. Demin(; is a native of the town he 
represents. He was born in Colebrook, January 20, 
1866, and is nearly 29 years of age. He received a 
common school education but did not have an oppor- 
tunity of attending college. He has never held any 
offices, State local or corporate, nor has he ever been 
a member of the General Assembly previous to this ses- 
sion. He has generally been engaged in farming. He 
will act with the Democratic party. 

J \MES P. Vaill was born in Cornwall, May 25, 1844, 
and is 50 years of age. He received a common school 
education and spent one winter at the Alger Institute in 
Cornwall. He has never held any offices. He has 
long been recognized as one of the town's prosperous 
farmers. In the ranks of the Republican party he has 
always been a generous worker. This is the first time 
that he has been elected to a seat in the General Assem- 
bly. He will act with the Republicans. 

Daniel N. Lucas is a native of Goshen, born June 
27, 1845, and is now in his fiftieth year. He enjoyed a 
common school and academic education. He has 
always been engaged in farming. He is an assessor of 
the town and has held the office for ten years He has 
always held the highest respect of the citizens, and it 
was due to his intense popularity that he received such 
a flattering election in November. He has always been 
a Republican and will act with the party in the General 
Assembly. This is his first e.xperience within a legis- 
lative body. 

Geok(;e Kennev is one of the oldest members 
of the House. He was born in Litchfield, 
November 28, 1824, and is over 70 years of age. 
He received a common school education and has been 
a faithful citizen of his native town for three-score and 
ten years. He is still vigorous, hale and hearty and 
enters into political enthusiasm with the zeal and ardor 
of a young man. He was for fourteen years proprietor 
of the stage from Litchfield to East Litchfield. For as 
many years he was a dealer in flour, feed, coal, lime, 
brick and builders' materials. He is at present agent 
for Adams Express Company. He holds the office of 
tax collector and is a director in the savings bank. This 
is his first mission at the capitol and he will be found 
with the Republican side every time. 



Edward R. Wooster is also a native of the town he 
will represent, having been born in Bridgewater, Sep- 
tember 17, 1861. He was educated in the public schools 
and by private instruction. Although a young man, 
only 33 years of age, he has alread)- been honored by 
receiving elections to the board of selectmen and board 
of relief, and he still holds the latter office. He is a 
farmer. He has not been a member of the House be- 
fore Like David B. Hill, he is not downcast at the 
Republican landslide, but is proud to assert " I am a 
Democrat." 

Edwin H.Clark was born at South Farms October 
13, 1S48, making him 46 years of age. He had a com- 
mon school training supplemented by a corrse in Mor- 
ris Academy from which he graduated in the class of 
'6f). He has always been prominent in town affairs 
and has been intimately associated with the duties of 
town offices for years. He is at present town clerk and 
for nine years he was a member of the board of select- 
men. He conducts a creamery in connection with his 
farm. He has not always been engaged in farming 
but was a merchant for nearly ten years. He is a 
Democrat. 

John Lyman Roberts is a native of Kent, born Jan- 
uary 22, 1841. He received a common school educa- 
tion. He was not privileged with a college training 
nor has he previously held any offices. He has long 
been a merchant and by strict attention to business has 
won the confidence of his friends. He has never been 
a representative before, but his long business life 
makes him particularly adapted to make a creditable 
record for his town. He is a Republican and a firm 
believer in the principles of the party. He will be a 
strong worker for Republican measures. He is nearly 
54 years of age. 

Frank Stoughton was born in Barkhamsted, April 
I, 1848, and is 46 years of age. He received an 
academic education and graduated fiom the famous 
" Gunnery " of Washington. He lived in Washington 
until he was 32 years of age when he removed to Beth- 
lehem. He has held a town office there every year since 
he was made a voter. He was selectman for seven 
years and has been grand juror, ta.x collector and pres- 
ident of the board of health. He still holds the office 
of road supervisor and is a member of the board of 
relief and of the town committee. He has always lived 
on a farm and he has a good income from well-stocked 
property His long association with town affairs makes 
him a valuable legislator. He has always been a 
Republican and may be counted upon to serve his party 
well at the capitol. 

Hudson M SEYMorR,who represents New Hartford, 
is a native of the town. He was born August 6, 1842. 
He has generally been engaged in farming. He was 
educated in the district school, afterward attending 
the State normal school. He received the advantages 
of a course at the Connecticut Literary Institute and at 
H. G. Eastman's Business College in Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y. He has never held any offices in the town nor 
has he ever represented his fellow-citizens in the Gen- 
eral -Assembly. His thorough business education and 
his long association with the best interests of the town 
will make him a valuable representative. He is a Re- 
publican. 



Joseph Ransley Gillette, who is one of New Hart- 
ford's representatives, is an Ohioan by birth. His 
native place is South Thompson, Geauga County, Ohio, 
where he was born, forty-six years ago, on March 28, 
1848. He was educated in the district school. His 
father, however, was a native of Bakersville, a district 
in New Hartford. After his family removed to Penn- 
sylvania, where Mr. Gillette lived until he was 9 
years of age, another change of residence was made 
and the family came back to Bakersville, Mr. Gillette 
is a farmer but has been prominent in politics. He 
is a grand juror and member of the board of relief. 
The latter office he has held since 1S90. He is a Re- 
publican. 

Obed H. Stannard was born at Norfolk, January 
30, 1894, and is nearly 46 years of age. He received a 
good education in the public schools and instruction 
in the South Berkshire Institute in New Marlboro, 
Mass. With the exception of three winters spent in 
teaching he has been engaged continuously in farming. 
He is a member of Manchester Grange. He has 
always taken an interest in the order. He has never 
held any offices in his town. He is a practical man 
and is thoroughly alive to reforms and improvements. 
He is a strong Republican. 

Henry E. Stoughton is a young man of thorough 
business training. He was born in Plymouth thirty 
years ago. Educated in the Plymouth schools and in 
the higher departments of education in a New Haven 
grammar school, his ability secured him a position in 
the Thomaston Savings Bank, of which he is now the 
secretary. He has always been active in politics. He 
holds the office of tax collector in which position he 
has served four years. He was secretary of the school 
board, and acting school visitor of Plymouth in 1S92 
and 1893, and is at present a member of the school 
board and of the town committee. He is a Republican, 
a vigorous party worker. This was his first acquaint- 
ance with affairs of the General Assembly. 

Fr.ancis a. Squire is a native of Roxbury, born 
June 10, 1844. He had a common-school training, 
and grew up with the respect of his fellow-townsmen. 
He has been honored with the office of town clerk. 
He is at present assessor and tax collector. He has 
not been elected to the General Assembly before this 
year. He has generally been a dealer in cattle. He 
has always been a Republican and will be found work- 
ing for the State and constituency that he represents 
with the party in whose hands are the interests of the 
commonwealth for the next two years. He is 50 years 
of age. 

Pierre Mundry was born September i, 1838, in 
Canton Berne, Switzerland. He received a common 
school education with further academic advantages. 
He came to this country when a very young man. He 
enlisted a« a private in the 13th Connecticut Infantry 
which afterward became the 2d Heavy Artillery ; 
he has an excellent record in the service of his country; 
He cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln and has 
always since been a true Republican. He has not held 
any offices heretofore, but has long been an influential 
citizen. He has generally been employed in painting ; 
he will act with the Republicans. 

David Kennev, who was reelected, was born in 
Litchfield May i, 1830, and is 64 years of age. He was 
educated in the common schools. He is grand juror 
and town agent of Washington. He has generally 
been engaged in the livery business, with contracts for 
carrying mails This is not his first experience in the 
House, as he was reelected, having been a member in 
1893. He is a Republican. 



George Edgar BijXKLEY was born in Ellsworth, 
September i, 1850. He is a Republican and has held 
the office of tax collector. He was educated in the 
district school. He has generally been engaged in 
farming and teaming. He has not been a member of 
the General Assembly before. He has long been a 
resident of Sharon and been associated with its 
interests. 

Aaron Thomas was born in Plymouth, March 13, 
1830. He was educated in the common school, and 
although he did not have the advantages of a college 
education has become prominently identified with the 
business and political interests of Thomaston, where 
he moved when a young man. He is engaged in the 
manufacture of clocks, an industry for which the town 
is famous. He at present holds the office of selectman 
and is 64 years old. This will not be his first acquaint- 
ance with legislative duties. He was a member of the 
House in 18S1. He will act with the Republicans. 



Edmond Wall was born in Ireland and is 45 years 
of age. He was educated in the national schools of 
Ireland and the night school in this county. He came 
here in 1S66, residing in New Jersey until 1S77, when 
he came to Torrington. He is serving a second term 
as grand juror. He is president of St. Francis T. A. 
and B. and has been Litchfield County director for C. 
T. A. U. of Connecticut. He is lecturer of Unity 
Council, K. of C. He is a builder and contractor. Mr. 
Wall is an uncompromising Republican. He organ- 
ized the St. Francis T. A. and B Society of Torring- 
ton and the St. F"rancis Cadets, a society of boys 
attached to the parent society, now numbering ninety. 
He was originally a Democrat. 

David Lyman So.mers is a native of Woodbury, born 
July 24, 1861. Although a young man of 33 years, he 
has had bestowed upon him many honors by his fellow- 
citizens. He is a member of the board of relief, a 
school visitor and more or less connected with other 
offices. He received an academical education which 
he has employed to the advantage of the town in 
which he lives. He has always taken a great interest 
in school work; he is a farmer; he is a fraternal man, 
and is at present secretary of the Order L'nited 
American Mechanics. He has had no legislative 
experience in the halls of the General Assembly. He 
is an enthusiastic Republican. 

Andrew G. Bar.nes, who will represent Comptroller 
Staub's home in the House, is a farmer and dealer in 
leaf tobacco. He has long been one of the prominent 
citizens of the town, and against its rock-ribbed De- 
mocracy has been a persistent fighter. He achieved a 
complete victory in the Republican sweep last Novem- 
ber. Mr. Barnes is a native of Sherman, and is 56 years 
of age. He received his education in the common 
schools. He has always been a steadfast supporter of 
the principles of the Republican party. He has never 
held an office previous to being elected to the Assembly. 
He will be found an ardent worker for the party in the 
House. 

Charles Bennet Garlick is 41 years old and was 
born in Roxbury, December 5, 1S53. He was edu- 
cated in the public and private schools of Roxbury. 
He holds no offices neither local nor corporate. His 
life has been spent in farming, and he owns a well- 
stocked farm in Woodbury, where he removed several 
3'ears ago. This is the first time that he has been 
called upon to represent the town at the State Capitol. 
He is a Republican. 



203 




WILLIAM T. ELMER 



William T. Elmer, of Middletown, one of 
the most prominent men in public life in Con- 
necticut to-day, whose eloquence has been 
heard from many rostrums, and whose argu- 
ments in behalf of the State have become 
famous in the judicial history of the common- 
wealth, was born in Rome, N. Y., in 1834, 
and his present age is therefore 60 years. He 
received an excellent common school and 
academic education, and entered Wesleyan 
University in 1853. He pursued his education 
at that institution, and was graduated in the 
class of 1857. Shortly after his matriculation 
he entered the University Law School of Al- 
bany, N. Y., and was admitted to the practice 
of the law at the bar of Hartford County in 
1859. In 1862-63 he was chosen Judge of 
Probate for the Middletown district, and in 
1863 he was elected Assistant Clerk of the 
House of Representatives. In the following 
year (1864) he was elected Clerk, and in 1865 
the Senate chose him as its Clerk. 

Dating from the year 1863, when Mr. Elmer 
was appointed Assistant Clerk of the House, 
then being a member of the Republican State 
Central Committee, and associated with such 
men as Senator O. H. Piatt, Prof. Northrop, 
formerly of the faculty of Yale College, late 
Congressman Starkweather and Bartlett Bent, 
and other Republican leaders, he was foremost 
in Republican politics of his county and State. 
For a quarter of a century he has been a mem- 
ber of a majority of the Republican State 
conventions, where he has been recognized as 
one of the true tried, and loyal leaders of the 
Republican party for his county. In his al- 
legiance and devotion to the principles of the 
Republican party there never has been anv 
wavering or shadow of turning since its forma- 



tion up to date. During the Greeley days and 
in all dark days of the party he never faltered, 
and was always found cheerfully and hopefully 
fighting in the foremost rank for its principles. 

As a lawyer he has taken a front rank at the 
bar in his county for years ; has been City 
Attorney, Judge of Probate, and now is State's 
Attorney, a position which he has held for over 
twenty years; in fact, since 1863, except a 
term of eight years, when he was Judge of the 
City Court. He has been prominently men- 
tioned for the position of Judge of the Superior 
Court, and it is thought he may be the Gov- 
ernor's appointee if he should conclude to 
accept. He has always taken an active interest 
in the common schools and in the higher edu- 
cation of the Middletown city school district. 
He has been a member of the Board of Edu- 
cation for several terms, having been chosen 
at the last election unanimously. He is now 
President of the Board for his second term, 
and is Chairman of the Building Committee, 
under whose direction one of the handsomest 
school buildings in the State is now nearing 
completion. 

As a member of the Senate in 1873 he was 
the leader of that body, being Chairman of the 
Judiciary Committee, and had associated with 
him on that committee such men as ex-Gov. 
Henry B. Harrison, Congressman John T. 
Waite, the late Samuel Jones, of Hartford, 
and other leading lawyers. He was practically 
President pro teiii. during that session, as he 
presided nearly all the time in the absence of 
the Lieutenant-Governor, Hon. Geo. G. Sill, 
of Hartford. Mr. Elmer held the oflfice of 
Alderman for several terms, afterward being 
elected Mavor of Middletown for 1876 and 
1877. 



ao4 




GEORGE M. CLARK 



George M. Clark, of Haddam, is one 
of the most prominent members of the 
House this session, as his long familiarity 
with legislation gives him great weight. 
Mr. Clark was born in Haddam, June ii, 
1833, 'i''"^ ^^'''^s educated in the public and 
private schools. Afterward he was most 
thoroughly educated in mechanical and 
civil engineering, also in the science of 
ship and house building, including nearlv 
every branch pertaining to the several 
parts. He has often employed as many as 
hve hundred to a thousand men in con- 
struction. In the years of 1885 and 1886 
he represented the town of Haddam in the 



Lower House, and in 1889 and 1891 repre- 
sented the Twenty-first Senatorial District. 
In the sessions of 1885 and 1886 he was 
Chairman of the Incorporation Committee, 
also of the Committee on Contingent Ex- 
penses, while in the Senate he was Chair- 
man of the Committees on Appropriations, 
New Towns and Probate Districts and 
Contested Elections. In 1891, during the 
deadlock, he was Chairman of the Repub- 
lican legislative caucus. He is President 
of the Higganum Savings Bank and of the 
Cutaway Harrow Company. He is chair- 
man of the Republican Town Committee, 
which position he has held for thirty years. 



805 




VHNE B. STARR 



Vine B. Starr, of Chatham, was born 
in East Hampton, Conn., November 7, 
1854, and received his education in the 
common schools of his native village and 
at private schools. He is a member of the 
school committee of the center district of 
Chatham, and is a director and one of the 
active managers of the Starr Brothers' 
Bell Company, a successful enterprise. 
He was in business in Colorado and New 
Mexico for about five years. 



Mr. Starr is a Republican. The 'Starr 
Brothers make a large varietv of first- 
class bells, and have an extensive and 
lucrative trade. 

Mr. Starr was married June 25, 1881, to 
Bessie C. Birdsey, of jNIiddlefield. They 
have four children, Albert B., Sophia B., 
Helen B., and Daniel H. Mr. Starr is 
chairman of the temperance committee. 
His friends know him for a man of no 
ostentation, but of sterling worth. 




GEORGE S. GLADDING 



George S. Gladding, of Chester, is 
now in his sixtv-first year, having been 
born in Deep River, Conn., May 12, 1834. 
He was educated in the public schools and 



was for several years a grand juror. He 
is a brush manufacturer by occupation, 
and during the present session will act with 
the Republicans. 



ao7 




JOHN A. CARRIER 



John A. Carrier, of Chatham, was 
born February 7, 1855 in Middle Haddani. 
He was educated in the public schools and 
at the Glastonbury Academy. He was 
Postmaster of Chatham for ten years, a 
position he filled with much credit. 

For twelve years he was a clerk, but for 
the past ten years he has been a merchant, 



successfully conducting a first-class general 
store. He has acceptably filled several 
public offices. 

On January 17, 1878, he married Caroline 
J. Simpson, ot Chatham. They have two 
children, Paul S. and Alfred B. 

Mr. Carrier is a consistent Democrat, 
and has hosts of friends. 



208 







HENRY C. HULL 



Henry C. Hull, of Clinton, was born 
in that town December 12, 1849, ^'is father 
being Oliver B. Hull, one of Clinton's most 
respected business men during a long life. 

Henr}- was one of five children. His 
education was received at the public 
schools and Clinton Academy. 

When sixteen years of age he entered 
the employ of his father and remained with 
him until the death of the latter, during 
the blizzard of March, 1888. His father 
was an extensive dealer in lumber, paints, 
and builders' hardware, and after his death 
the business was taken by the son, and has 
since been conducted very successfully by 



him. Mr. Hull is also agent for several 
leading insurance companies. 

In 1 876 Mr. Hull was united in marriage 
to Miss Arabella A. Meigs, the only 
daughter of James R. Meigs, of Madison^ 
Conn., and they reside very happily in 
their cozy residence on Main street. Mr. 
Hull is an ardent Republican, and held 
for many years the offices of Town Clerk, 
Town Treasurer, Judge of Probate, and 
other positions of trust. 

He is a business man of excellent ability, 
and highly respected by the people. Mr. 
Hull will, without doubt, represent his 
town in an able manner in legislative halls. 



ao9 




EDBERT D. HAMMOND 



Edbert D. Hammond, of Cromwell, 
was born in VVardsboro, Vermont, August 
7, 1857. He was educated in the public 
schools, worked in a grocery store in 
Brattleboro, Vt., for a while, and return- 
ing to his home, attended a private school. 
He came to Connecticut in 1878, and soon 
after located in Cromwell, where he has 
since resided. 

In 1887 he formed the Cromwell Co- 
operative Creamer}-, and has been its 
secretary, treasurer and general manager 



up to the present. For two years past 
Mr. Hammond has been a director of the 
Connecticut Creamery Association, and is 
also a member of the State Dairyman's 
Association. He is one of the firm of 
Briggs, Hammond & Mullen, artesian 
well drivers, the supervision of which 
work has devolved entirely upon Mr. 
Hammond. 

In 1880 he was chairman of the Republi- 
can Town Committee, and still retains his 
membership. 



210 




E. A. MARKHAM 



Ernest Arthur Markham, of Durham, 
was born in Windsor, Vt., October i6, 
1853. He is a descendant in the eighth 
generation from Deacon Daniel Markham, 
one of the early settlers of ^liddletown. 

After receiving a preparatory education 
in the South, and high schools of Hartford 
and the Middletown High School, he en- 
tered Wesleyan University, taking all the 
elective courses in laboratory work in 
practical and analytical chemistry for spe- 
cial honors, and in 1875 received the degree 
of A.B., ten years later also that of A. M. 
He studied at the Eclectic Medical College, 
in New York, being made an M.D. by that 
institution in 1877 and 1878. 

Though this is Dr. Markham's first ex- 
perience in the Legislature, he has held 
many local offices, having been Justice ot 
the Peace, Town Auditor and member of 
the Board of Relief, President of Durham 



Public Library and one of its prime insti- 
gators, President of the Durham Liter- 
ary Society, Health Officer, Medical Ex- 
aminer for the New York Life Insurance 
Company, member of the Connecticut His- 
torical Society, Sons of American Revolu- 
tion, K. of P/and O. U. A. >L With the 
aid of a few citizens he has revived the 
Durham Academy, under the Indian name 
of the town, "The Coginchaug School," 
and at considerable private expense has 
given the pupils the benefit of a graded 
school, retaining the position of Chairman 
and Secretary of the Committee. 

Dr. Markham has been Vestryman of 
the Church of the Epiphanv for about fif- 
teen years. 

Since his graduation Dr. Markham has 
enjoyed an extensive and lucrative prac- 
tice in Durham. His politics is " Demo- 
cratic — if for the good of Durham." 




WALDO R. AT WELL 



Waldo R. Atwell. of Durham, was 
born in that tcjwn November ii, 1847. 

The common schools and the academy 
ol his native place gave him his education. 
He worked on a farm until hs was 20 years 
old. when he changed his occupation to 



that of a butcher, and has since been iden- 
tified with that business. Mr. Atwell has 
been a valued member of the Board of 
Relief for eight or ten years, and is also 
prominent in lodge affairs. He is an un- 
swerving Republican. 



212 




ROBERT WELLINGTON BINGHAM 



Robert Wellington Bingham, of East 
Haddam, was born in East Iladdam, 
August 7, 1 85 1. He attended the com- 
mon schools and a select school for two 
years, and in 1872 was graduated from 
Eastman's Business College, Poughkeep- 
sie, N. Y. He was Census Enumerator m 
1890, Tax Collector in 1892, and the first 
Secretary and Treasurer of the East Had- 
dam Creamery Company. At present he 
is the efficient Registrar of Electors, Grand 
Juror and Clerk and Treasuier of the first 
school district, and Chairman of the Re- 
publican Town Committee. He is also a 
popular member of the East Haddam 
Grange, No. 56, and of the Order of Ameri- 
can Mechanics, and of the First Congre- 
gational Church of East Haddam. 



Mr. Bingham is on the important Com- 
mittee on Railroads. He has one of the 
best farms in his section of the State, 
and is known as a progressive man in 
agricultural affairs. He is especially inter- 
ested in sheep-raising. 

Mr. Bingham was married May 19, 1873, 
to Mary T. V'arley. They have two bright 
children, Harry V., and Robert W., Jr. 

Mr. Bingham's great-grandfather was in 
the Revolutionary War, and his five broth- 
ers followed the stars and stripes in the 
War of the Rebellion, two of them giving 
their lives to the cause. He is actively 
interested in the welfare of his native town 
and in the prosperity of the church, in 
every way faithfully serving the public 
weal. < 



213 




JAMES HOWELL CLARK 



James Howell ClxVkk, of Essex, was 
born in Essex, September 17, 1839, '^•'''c' i^ 
consequently in his fifty -fifth year. His 
only education was in winter in the com- 
mon schools, until he was eighteen. For 
the past forty -two years he has been work- 
ing- on ivory for the Comstock Cheney 
Company, except for the time that he 
served in the Civil War as sergeant of 
Company B., Twenty-Fourth Regiment, 



C. v., and from 1870 to 1872, when he was 
engaged in the pearl fishery business on 
the west coast of South America. Mr. 
Clark w^as for five years a Selectman, and 
has also been a grand juror and member of 
the Board of Relief. He is a Republican. 
The Clark family was among the first 
settlers of Sa3'brook, Conn., and their 
history would of itself make a large and 
very interesting volume. 



214 




EVERETT EDWARD LORD 



Everett Edward Lord, of Killing- 
worth, was born in Killing-worth, April 24, 
1856, and is consequently in the thirty- 
eighth year of his age. After receiving a 
common-school education, and being two 
years in a preparatory school, he became 
a contractor and superintendent of an iron 
foundry, in which business he is still en- 
gaged. Mr. Lord has never before held 
public office, and his only office of any 
kind is that of a member of the Board of 



Managers of the Connecticut Societ}- of 
Sons of the American Revolution, in which 
he is serving his third year. Mr. Lord has 
a war ancestr}^ his father having served in 
the Union Army in the war between the 
States ; his grandfather in the war of 1812, 
and his great-grandfather in the Revolu- 
tion. Mr. Lord was elected as a Republi- 
can. He is a descendant of Richard Lord, 
whose tomb at New London is the oldest 
east of the Connecticut River. 



213 




LYMAN A. MILLS 



LvMAN A. Mills, oi Middlefiekl, a 
Republican, was born in Middlefiekl (then 
belonging- to Middletown) February 25, 
1 841. Prominent in the management, and 
as an officer of the Metropolitan Manu- 
facturing Company from a time not long 
after its origin in i860 — and recently man- 
ager at the Middlefield Plant of The 
American Wringer Company — Mr. Mills 
has been a manufacturer during nearly all 
his business life. 

When, in 1866, Middlefield was set off 
from the town of Middletown, he was 
chosen Town Clerk, and two years later 
Town Treasurer, and has so continued hold- 
ing these offices now by unanimous yotc. 



He is a director of the American 
Wringer Company, a trustee of the Mid- 
dleton Savings Bank, President of tlie Leyi 
E. Coe Library Association, treasurer ot 
the Trustees of" The Ecclesiastical Fund in 
the Society of Middlefield," a trustee ot 
the Calhoun Colored School, Calhoun, 
.Alabama, and hokis yarious other similar 
positions. Mr. Mills is known throughout 
the United States as a breeder of Jersey 
cattle, in which pursuit he has been engaged 
since 1867. He has had the care and man- 
agement of various property and estate 
interests, and is one of Connecticut's re- 
presentative manufacturing and financial 
men. 



316 




GILES A. BUSHNELL 



Giles A. Bushnell, of Old Saybrook, 
was born in Westbrook, August 24, 1S39, 
He attended school until 15 years of a<^e 
when he entered his father's store as a 
clerk. 

He continued there until x\pril i, 1.S63, 
when he went to Centerbrook and formed 
a partnership with D. W. Spencer, under 
the name of Bushnell & Spencer, doing a 
general merchandise business. In a little 
less than three years the partnership was 
dissolved, and May 17, 1866, Mr. Bushnell 
started in business in Old Saybrook in his 
present store, and has continued there 
without a break ever since. He has cred- 
itably held the office of Town Treasurer 



for several years, and was Postmaster for 
four years, from August i, 1889, to August 
1, 1893, under President Harrison. He was 
treasurer of the Congregational Church 
in old Saybrook for many years, and is 
now on its standing committee. 

Mr. Bushnell is a descendant of one of the 
early settlers of Saybrook. His father was 
a senator from the old Nineteenth district. 

On May g, 1865, he married Ellen M. 
Rcdheld, of Essex. They have a son, 
William R., born March 31, 1866, who is 
associated with his father in business. Mr. 
Bushnell is a staunch Republican and a 
faithful member of the Committee on 
Cities and Boroughs. 




m 



n 



^ ij^. 



■■f^- 



\ 






/ 



X 



ASAPH H. HALE 



Asaph H. Hale, of Portland, was born 
in Portland, December, 28, 1847. He 
attended the district schools and Chase's 
Institute in Middletown. He has for the 
past twelve to fifteen 3'eai"s been acting 
School Visitor, Assessor and Town Audi- 



tor. Mr. Hale has been variously occu- 
pied — being a teacher, bookkeeper and 
lumber dealer. He is a Democrat, and 
hopes to be able to vote for better roads 
and a bridge across the Connecticut be- 
tween Portland and Middletown. 



218 




HORACE G. JONES 



Horace G. Jones, the senior representative 
from Saybrook, was born in that town March 
lo, 1840. He was educated at the public 
schools. The son of a farmer, he passed his 
boyhood on the farm, and at the age of seven- 
teen engaged in shad fishing on the Connect- 
icut river. At the close of the fishing season 
he embarked as a sailor on a coasting vessel 
running from New York to Providence. For 
two years he followed the occupation of house 
carpentering, leaving that to enlist in Co. G., 
7th Conn. Vols., on the breaking out of the 
rebellion. 

He served his country faithfully, and was 
honorably discharged on September 12, 1864, 
before Petersburg, Va. 

On his return from the war he resumed the 
work of a carpenter and builder, a part of the 
time in New Haven, in which line he continued 
until 1879, when he became interested in the 
spoke and handle business, purchasing in that 
year the plant of Oliver Buell, in Chester. A 
year later these works were destroyed by fire. 



but new machinery for his factory in Deep 
River was purchased, and, in the following 
spring, increasing trade compelled him to put 
in a steam plant. Again he suffered loss by 
fire in the burning of this factory on October 
31, 1881 ; but not to be discouraged, he leased 
the factory at Newtown and occupied it one 
year, then purchasing and removing the ma- 
chinery to Ivoryton. Here he remained for 
five years, when he returned to Chester, ac- 
quiring the plant which he now occupies, and 
which is one of the best-equipped spoke and 
handle plants in Connecticut. He is also a 
dealer in builders' hardware and agricultural 
implements. 

Mr. Jones has been before the public in an 
official capacity, continuously, for twenty-one 
years — eighteen years as collector of taxes, 
three years on the board of selectmen, the 
chairmanship of which he now holds. 

He has always been a Republican. 

On October 5, 1865, he married Miss Clark, 
the eldest daughter of the late Textius Clark. 



219 




THOMAS L. PARKER 



Thomas L. Parker, of Savbrook, is a 
native of East Haddam, Conn., where he 
was born thirty-eight years ago. He was 
educated at the public and private schools 
and graduated at Eastmans Business Col- 
lege, P<Highkeepsie, N. V., in 1876. Mr. 
Parker has been a member of the Board 
of Education for manv vears, and is identi- 



fied with the Republican party; he is a 
druijsfist, and is a brother of Prosecuting 
Attorney Francis H. Parker, of Hartford. 
He has proven himself a reliable man in 
liis profession and built up a large trade. 
He is decidedly popular with his partv 
and a favorite with the vounger element. 
He is an active and eners-etic worker. 



220 



't'??."'"'*'-^^**^.' 




WILLIAM I. LEWIS 



William I. Lewis, representative from the 
town of Westbrook, was born in New Canaan, 
this State; he received an academical educa- 
tion. He studied law for three years in New 
York and two years at the Columbian Univer- 
sity, at Washington, I). C. Mr. Lewis served 
his country during the war in the Twentieth 
Connecticut Volunteers and soon after enlist- 
ment was placed on detailed service with 
General Kane, brother of the famous Arctic 
explorer. Mr. Lewis was captured by the 
guerilla Moseby, and incarcerated in Castle 
Thunder and Libby prisons. Before the close 
of the war he was made the general accountant 
of the military railroads of the United States, 
and he successfully accomplished the work of 
classifying and tabulating the multifarious 
reports of the thirty-five railroads operated by 
the Government throughout the rebellious 
States into one volume or tabulated state- 
ment, now on file at Washington and said to be 
the finest and most complete statistical work 
of its kind in existence. Mr. Lewis was in the 
office of the Secretary of the Treasury and 
while there originated the system and rules 
governing the expenses of collecting the 
revenue from customs throughout the United 
States. He was also associated for eight 
years with the Sergeant-at-Arms of the United 
States Senate and has a wide knowledge and 
acquaintance of public men. 

Shortly after the war Mr. Lewis married 
Miss Isadora Winship, of Georgetown, I). C. 
Three sons and three daughters are the fruit 
of this union. 

He is a member of the Presbyterian church, 
and with his good wife founded a mission 
church of that denomination while sojourning 
in Washington. He is a member of the West- 
brook Grange and is also a Free Mason, and 



in politics has always been a pronounced Re- 
publican. He believes in progression, and 
takes great interest in everything pertaining 
to the welfare of Connecticut. He is known 
as an enterprising citizen of the town of West- 
brook. He has resided at Grove Beach, be- 
tween the villages of Clinton and Westbrook, 
with his family since 1872. He is a very 
nervy, tireless worker at whatever he under- 
takes, as shown by his energy in causing the 
opening of the new and beautiful shore drive 
running through Grove Beach and connecting 
the towns of Clinton and Westbrook, and in 
his untiring and persistent work for the break- 
water improvement at Duck Island Harbor on 
the sea front of these towns. 

He is the founder of Grove Beach, and the 
improvements and wonderful growth of this 
place in the past few years is due to him more 
than any other person for his enterprise and 
push in developing this charming summer re- 
sort. As might naturally be supposed Mr. 
Lewis is a Grand Army man. Early in the 
history of the order, and while living in Alex- 
andria, he united, with others, in the formation 
.f the first Grand Army post in Virginia. 
Afterward he joined the Burnside Post in 
Washington, D. C. Mr. Lewis was alternate 
delegate to the Minneapolis Convention which 
nominated President Harrison. 

He was put forward by his friends as a 
candidate for Congressional honors in the con- 
vention which nominated Hon. N. I). Sperry. 

One of his first acts in the Legislature was 
the presentation of a bill directing the National 
flag to be displayed on the Capitol Building, 
from sunrise to sunset, every day in the year. 
He urged the passage of his bill in an eloquent 
and patriotic speech. The rules were sus- 
pended and the bill passed unanimously. 



221 



Charles O. Gillette is of Western birth, having 
been born in Milan, Ohio, September 6, 1841. He was 
educated at Wilbraham, Mass., at VVesleyan Academy. 
He has sat in neither branch of the General Assembly, 
but has been, and now is, collector of taxes for the 
town of Haddam. He is a manufacturer of baskets 
and is a Republican. 

NoRM.\N L. I'.VRMEI.EF. is an old member, having 
been in the House in 1S93. Mr. Parmelec is a native 
of the town he represents, having been born there 
March 16, 1S93. He has been a member of the board 
of relief and has always been interested in church 
work, having been a member of the Congregational 
Society Committee and is at present a member of the 
board of trustees of church corporation. 

Cn.\RLES R. Lewis, of Middletown, was born in that 
city luly 24, 1831, and is consequently in his 63d year. 
His father, Joseph H. Lewis, of old Puritanical stock, 
came to Connecticut from Massachusetts early in 1800 
and located in Middletown, where he raised a family 
of nine children, the subject of this sketch being the 
youngest ; he was educated in the public schools. 



After serving four terms as councilman and two as 
alderman he was elected mayor of the city in iSSS, and 
served one term with great honor to himself and his 
native city. He has also been first selectman of Mid- 
dletown, and for years a member of the board of edu- 
cation. He is president of the Middletown Building 
and Loan Association, and is also district deputy of 
Central Lodge, I. O. O. F. He is now, and for twenty 
years has been, foreman of the toolroom of the Mid- 
dletown Plate Company, where he is highly appre- 
ciated by employers and employees alike. As a 
Republican candidate for office he has always been a 
favorite, as his always large majorities will attest. 

Francis W. Swan, of East Haddam, is a native of 
that town, having been born there February 27, 1841. 
Although this was Mr. Swan's first experience in 
either branch of the General Assembly he has held 
many local offices, having been postmaster for twelve 
years, selectman, assessor and member of the board of 
relief. Mr. Swan, who is a lumber dealer and also a 
farmer, recei%'ed a common-school education and will 
this session act with the Republicans. 



•sa 




WILLIAM SUMNER 



William Sumner, of Tolland, first 
Representative from the shire town of the 
county, was born in the town he repre- 
sents, April 3, 1826, and is consequently 68 
years old. He received a common-school 
education, and later studied law. Up to 
1856 he practiced law, but since that year 
he has been in business. From that year 
much of his business has been in the West. 
Until 1887 his home was for most of the 
time Cincinnati. From 1857 to 1874 he 



was general salesagent for the Wheeler & 
Wilson Manufacturing Company. Since 
1874 he has been engaged in building and 
operating gas works, banking, manufactur- 
ing and milling. Mr. Sumner was Clerk of 
thecourtsfor Tolland County and Judge of 
Probate for the district of Tolland in 1S54- 
'55. In politics he is a Republican. 

He was married December 11, 1857, to 
Juliette C. Bishop, of Tolland. They have 
one daughter living, Edith B. 




'^ ^ 







RATCLIFFE HICKS 



his Alma Mater by founding 



Ratcliffe Hicks, second Representa- 
tive from Tolland, was born in the town 
he represents October 3. 1843, -^"d is a 
Democrat of staunch lo3-aIty. 

Mr. Hicks studied at Monson Academy 
and Williston Seminary, entering Brown 
University in i860, and graduating there- 
from in 1864 with the degree of A. B. 

He was a prominent Delta Upsilon man 
while at college, and later proved his 
interest in " " ' 
the Hicks Prizes for oratory. 

He taught school in his native village, 
studied law in Judge Waldo's office and 
was admitted to the bar in 1866. associating 
himselt that year with United States Sena- 
tor Flatt in the practice of law. He was 
City Attorney of Meriden from 1869 to 
1874, and County Attorney for New 
Haven from 1873 to 1876. As early as 
1866 Mr. Hicks served in the Legislature 
from Tolland, being then the youngest 
member of that body. Among the able 
and brilliant speeches there made by him 
should be mentioned the one against the 
death penalty, in 1893. The business 
career of Mr. Hicks has been coincident 
with that of the Canheld Rubber Com- 
pany, ot Bridgeport, Conn., which in- 



creased its capital from $10,000 to §250,- 
000 in 1S93; its sales now being $1,000,000 
per year. Mr. Hicks is the owner, manager 
and president of the concern. 

Mr. Hicks' ancestors came to Scituate, 
Mass., from London, probably previous to 
1 62 1, and from them sprung a line of 
hardy. God-fearing and public-spirited 
people who well maintained the New Eng- 
land name for all that is best in American 
manhood and womanhood. One of the 
strongest and finest traits in Mr. Hicks' 
character is his unswerving loyalty and 
devotion to his native town, Tolland, ex- 
tensive travel in this and the old world, 
and long residence in other and larger 
places, having failed to overcome his en- 
during attachment for the scenes and 
friends of his childhood. He w^as largel}' 
instrumental in having the Congregational 
Church in Tolland remodeled, some two 
years ago, at an expense of about five 
thousand dollars ; he has lately given a 
thousand dollars to the Storrs Agricultural 
College in Tolland County, to establish 
permanent prizes for composition and 
public speaking, and has given the same 
amount to the Meriden High School for 
similar prizes. 



234 



J^ 




CHARLES L. BACKUS 



Charles L. Backus, representative oi 
Andover, was born in Lebanon, January 
14, 1848, his ancestors being one of the 
early families of prominence in Eastern 
Conn., who engaged in smelting iron and 
manufacturing various farm implements 
and useful utensils. His father, Sylvanus, 
was one of ten children, and at the time 
of the birth of the subject of this sketch 
owned a farm in Goshen Society, town of 
Lebanon. Here his early schooling was 
secured, which was supplemented by later 
instruction at the select school of Miss 
Lucy Pettis and at the Norwich Free 
Academy. After finishing study, he 
taught school for several seasons, then, 
desiring to see more of the world, engaged 



with Henry Bill, who was at that time 
prominent in the book-publishing business, 
and for him traveled several years through 
the Middle and Western States. For the 
last fifteen years he has been salesman for 
houses in New York and Boston in the 
fertilizer trade, and has a general and 
extensive acquaintance through New Eng- 
land. 

He has a wife and five children, his eld- 
est son being in the grocery business at 
Thompson. In politics he has always been 
a Republican. Mr. Backus was Post- 
master under Harrison, and is now Chair- 
man of the Board of Education in his 
town, besides serving on that committee 
in the House. 




WILLIAM E. ALVORD 



William E. Alvord, of Bolton, repre- 
resents his native tinvn in the present 
Legislature, and was born December i6, 
1S63. He received a common-school edu- 
cation. He has twice served on the Board 
of School Visitors for six years past, also 
having held many of the mint)r town 
offices. Mr. Alvord is now Chairman of 
the School Board and Town Auditor. 

In politics he is a Republican and 
has been Chairman of the Republican 



Town Committee for the last seven years. 
He was formerly engaged in agricultu- 
ral pursuits but is now a soaj) manu- 
facturer. 

Mr. Alvord is the fourth member of the 
Republican party to represent the old 
Democratic town of Bolton in the Legisla- 
ture, his brother, the late Joseph C. 
Alvord, of Manchester, being one of the 
other three who represented this town 
in the Legislature of 1882. 




JOHN S. CHAMPLIN 



John S. Champlin, of Coventry, was 
born in North Lyme, July 25, 1868. He 
received a common school education ; he 
is a hairdresser and tobacconist. Itj ppli- 



jtics he is a Democrat, and thouj^h he has 
been a resident of Coventry for twenty- 
three years, this is the first political office 
•he has ever held. 



'ustr 




JOHN THOMPSON 



John Thompson, of Ellington, who re- 
presents his native town in the House, was 
born January ii, 1840. He received a 
common-school education in Ellington, and 
has followed the calling of a farmer most 
of his life. 

In the war, Mr. Thompson served in 
Company F., Twenty-fifth Regiment, Con- 
necticut Volunteers, being a non-com- 
missioned officer. He was wounded se- 
verely at Irish Bend, La., April 14, 1863. 

He has been prominent in the public 
affairs of his town and State, having held 
the office of Selectman, which he still re- 
tains, besides having represented Ellington 
in the Legislature of 1885. He has been 



Master ot Ellington Grange and Master ot 
East Central Pomona Grange. 

At present Mr. Thompson is President 
of the Ellington Creamery, and a member 
of the State Board of Agriculture. Politi- 
cally he is a firm believer in the Republi- 
can party. The Thompson family is an old 
one in Connecticut, the ancestors of the 
subject of this sketch having migrated from 
the North of Ireland, and settledin Melrose 
(then known as " Irish Row "),in 1720. 

Mr. Thompson's maternal grandfather 
was a soldier in the Revolutionar}- War, 
and his mother's brother in the war of 
1 81 2, the latter witnessing the execution of 
Major Andre, the British spy. 



228 



^ 




" ^B^ 




WlLLIAiM JEWETT WARNER 



William Jewett Warner, of Hebron, 
was the j^oungest son of William T. and 
Olive M. (Hutchinson) Warner. He was 
born in Gilead, town of Hebron, March i, 
1864. He was educated in the ])ublic 
and private schools in the town, and has 
held office on the Board of Assessors and 
the Board of Relief, and is now a member 
of the Republican Town Committee. 

Mr. Warner is a great great-grandson of 
both Dr. Gibbons Jewett — who was sur- 
geon in the Revolutionary War — -and Lieu- 



tenant William Talcott, who served in the 
same war. June 8, 1886, he was married 
to Ella C, only daughter of Norman P. 
and Lydia A. (Norton) Warner. They 
have one child, Norman Jewett, born 
x*\ugust 26, 1887. Last fall and winter he 
traveled extensively in the West and along 
the Pacific Coast, studying Western meth- 
ods of growing grain. He is a farmer and 
grain dealer by occupation, and by upright 
dealings has gained a large circle ot 
friends and patron?. 



229 




FRED. O. VINTON 



Fred. (). Vinton, ot Mansfield, is a 
native of the town he represents, and was 
born April 26, 1864. He received an ex- 
cellent education at the Willimantic High 
School and Hannum's Business College, 
Hartford. His great-grandfather was a 
capable officer in the Revolutionary War. 
For several years he was clerk in his 
father's general store, but succeeded him 
in business November i, 1890. The store 
is one of the largest and best countrv 
stores in the State. Mr. Vinton's ever- 



increasing business speaks louder than 
words as to his popularity and upright 
business principles. This fact will explain 
why he is at present postmaster and rail- 
road station and express agent. He is 
Clerk on the Committee of Capitol Furni- 
ture and Grounds, and a member of the 
Putnam Memorial Park Committee. On 
November 21, 1880, he married Annie E. 
Rogers, of Willimantic. Mr. Vinton is an 
Odd Fellow, and is a valuable worker for 
the Republican party. 



*30 




C. H. WEEKS 



C. H. Weeks, of Mansfield, was born in 
Eastford, Conn., August ii, 1855, and re- 
ceived a common-school education. 

He came to Mansfield Centre in 1882, 
where he opened a grocery and general 
merchandise business, which increased to 
such an extent as to make it necessary in 
'go to erect a commodious store near the 
church, finishing a hall in the upper story 
which is used as a lodge room by various 
societies and for public gatherings, meet- 
ing a long-felt need in this part ot the 
town. 

He is a man wide-awake in business 



enterprise and energy. He purchased and 
fitted up one of the finest picnic grounds 
in this part of the State. 

Mr. Weeks has, during his residence in 
town, gained the respect and confidence 
of his fellow -citizens, whom he has served 
in manv public offices. For four ^-ears 
he was Postmaster, also Town Clerk and 
Chairman of the Republican Town Com- 
mittee, and represents his town at the 
State Legislature. He is a member of 
Elm wood Lodge, A. (). U. W., also its 
receiver, and has been financier. Mr. 
Weeks was Town Collector for six years. 



831 



• K 1*^>i'>-^ 




OSCAR KEENEY 



Oscar Keexev, of Somers, was born in 
South Manchester, June 3, 1859. He was 
educated in town schools and at Monson 



Academy. He is a woolen manufacturer, 
and is a member of the Republican 
party. 



*« 




NATHANIEL A. PATTEN 



Nathaniel A. Pat ten, oi Somers, was 
born in Somers, April 7, i82(S. He re- 
ceived his education in the common 
schools, supplementing it with an academic 
course. He is now a Grand Juror ot his 



town. Previous!}' he had served on the 
Assessors' and the Relief Boards. He 
is a farmer, and a strenuous worker in the 
Republican party. Mr. Patten is also a 
Notarv Public. 




J. CARL CONVERSE 



J. Carl Converse, of Stafford, was born 
in that town in April, 1863, and graduated 
from Wesleyan University in 1886. His 
father, the late Hon. Julius Converse, has 
a name honored in the political and busi- 
ness history of Connecticut. 

The first appearance in politics of the 
younger Converse was in 1888, when he 
was elected a representative to the Gen- 
eral Assembly for Stafford, receiving a 
handsome majority, although the town 
went strongly Democratic, and a Demo- 
cratic colleague was chosen with him. His 
ability in the House won him recognition 
as an active and leading member. 

Since 1890 he has spent much of his time 
in New York in the sale of woolen fabrics. 



in the manufacture of which he has con- 
siderable interests. 

Returning to Stafford, he was persuaded 
to again represent the town, and in the 
following election received tlie largest vote 
ever given a Republican in the town. 

Mr. Converse is interested in various 
public enterprises, and last fall declined a 
re-election to the Stafford Springs Borough 
Court of Burgesses. 

He holds the highest office in Ionic 
Lodge of Free Masons, and is one of the 
most popular and capable young men of 
the town. 

In the present General Assembly he 
holds the important position of Chairman 
of the Committee on Appropriations. 



«34 




JOHN RANDOLPH WASHBURN 



John Randolph Washp.urn was born in 
Staftord January 7, 1821, and is the oldest 
member of the present Legislature. This is the 
eighth time of his election to the Legislature. 
The dates of his membership are as follows, 
viz. : House of Representatives in 1 850-1856- 
1857-1866-1869-1875-1895, Senate in 1862. 

He is a descendant of the first settlers of 
Stafford. His great-great-grandfather, Samuel 
\Vashburn, moved from Bridgewater, Mass., to 
Stafford in 1730, and with his son Soloman 
and grandson Nathan went into the army of the 
revolution and participated in the battle of 
Bunker Hill in 1775. 

Soloman and his son Nathan Washburn were 
in the regiment of which Israel Putnam was 
the Colonel in command. Nathan Washburn, 
the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
was in the army of the revolutionary war five 
years, and was promoted to the office of Cap- 
tain and was a pensioner. J. R. Washburn 
has held offices in the town he represents most 
of the time since he was 26 years old, having 
been selectman, board of relief school com- 
mittee, etc. He has been a member of the 
board of school visitors most of the time since 
1848, and also a justice of the peace. He has 
held offices in the Masonic and Odd Fellows 
lodges, is now acting school visitor and is, 
and has been for years, secretary of the board 
of school visitors. In the Legislature he has 



been a member of the following committees, 
viz. : federal relations, roads and bridges, edu- 
cation, engrossed bills, new towns and probate 
districts, railroads and forfeited rights, house 
chairman of the last two named. He was 
educated in the district and select schools of 
Monson and Stafford, and high school in 
Allegany County, N. Y. At the age of 24 
years he became a partner of the late Moses B. 
Harvey, of Stafford, in the manufacture of 
machinery, which has been his business most of 
the time since. 

He commenced the manufacture of lathe 
chucks in 1848 under a patent granted to the 
late Simon Fairman (the father .of his wife), 
and was for several years the largest manu- 
facturer of those tools in the United States or 
in any other country. He (Mr. Washburn) 
obtained a patent for an improvement on "lathe 
and drill chucks" September 29, 1868. He 
was the inventor of the geared scroll chucks 
now in such universal use throughout this and 
other countries, having made the first one ever 
known in the year 1850. 'I'his chuck is now 
made substantially as it was then made by him, 
or under his direction, with some modifications. 
He was advised to get it patented, but not 
anticipating such a universal demand as there 
has been, did not think it advisable to do so un- 
til after he had placed it upon the market, and 
hence it was claimed, had given it to the public. 





GEORGE WALLACE 



George Wallace, of Union, was born 
in Holland, Mass., March 20, 1852. He 
was educated in the common schools. The 
death of his father deprived him of his 
natural adviser when he was ten years of 
age. From that time until he was twenty- 
one, he attended school, worked out farm- 
inji^, in mills and teaming-. Then he 
engaged in the lumber business, and has 
followed that vocation, with farminsf, in 
the towns of Holland and Union ever 
since. He is Registrar of Voters and 



Chairman ot the Republican Town Com- 
mittee. He served on the Board of Re- 
lief for two years, and was overseer of the 
Mashapaug Grange, No. loi, for two 
years. 

In August, 1888, Mr. Wallace married 
Miss Emily M. Curtis, of Ashford. They 
have one daughter. Bertha L. Mr. Wal- 
lace is deeply concerned in all that tends 
to the good of his town, and possesses the 
respect and friendship of all who know 
him. 



•im 




FREDERICK J. ALDRICH 



Frederick J. Aldrich, ot Union, was 
born in Uxbridge, Mass., April 23, 1856. 
He attended district schools and also the 
Friends' boarding school in Providence, 
R. I. In his youth he learned the wheel- 
wright's trade. For the past fifteen years 
he has been in the sawmill business. In 
politics he is an independent Democrat, and 
in cases where he thinks the interests of 
society and good government demand 
action independent of party, he acts 
according to his beliefs. On November 



21, 1887, he married Lucy P. Horton, of 
Union. They have four children, Herbert 
D., Ida M. (deceased), Henry R., and an 
infant son. The grandfather and father of 
Mrs. Horton both had the honor of repre- 
senting their town in the Legislature for 
several \ears. Mr. Aldrich's father was 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen for a 
dozen years. He has established an 
extensive business, and he and his wife are 
much beloved bv a large circle of 
friends. 



23T 




JOHN E. FAHEV 



John E. Fahev, of Vernon, was born 
in Manchester, Conn., in December, 1857, 
and attended the public schools of Man- 
chester and Rockville. Mr. Fahey entered 
the mills at an earl}' age. and is an expert 
cotton carder and spinner. He is at pres- 
ent connected with the Samuel Fitch & 
Sons Co., of Rockville. 

In politics Mr. Fahey has been an aident 
and consistent Republican, and at present 
represents Ward Three in the Board of 
Aldermen. 

This ward is naturally strongly Demo- 
cratic, but at the last election i December, 



1893) Mr. Fahev was elected bv a handsome 
majority. 

Mr. Fahey has been Chairman of the 
Fire Department Committee of his cit}', 
and is at present Chairman of Committee 
on Public Works and Streets; also of the 
Health Committee. 

Mr. Fahey is a prominent Forester, be- 
ing a Past Chief Ranger, and Deput)' 
Grand Chief Ranger, as well as Supreme 
Deputy for Connecticut of the Companions 
of the Forest, and in the A. O. U. W. a 
Past Master Workman, and a member of 
the Grand Lodsfe of Massachusetts. 



23S 




HORACE G. TALCOTT 



Horace G. Talcott, of Vernon, was 
born in Vernon, November 14, 1847. He 
is a graduateof Phillips' Andover Academy, 
of the class of 1867. For a tune he was a 
member of the class of 1871 in Yale Col- 
lege, but ill health, obliged him to leave 
college. He is engaged in woolen manu- 
facturing, being general manager of the 
Talcott Bros. Co., and is also a direc- 
tor in the First National Bank of 
Rockville. 



In church and benevolent work he takes 
an active part, holding various offices in 
the local church, and is also a director in 
the Connecticut Home Missionary Society. 

Mr. Talcott is a descendant of John Tal- 
cott (styled " The Worshipful Mr. John 
Talcott "), who was one of the founders of 
the Colony of Connecticut, built the first 
house in Hartford, and was also one of the 
chief magistrates of the Colony. He is a 
firm believer in Republican principles. 



•:m 




ARTHUR H. ELDREDGE 



Arthur H. Eldredge, of Willinjj^ton. 
was born in Willimantic, January g, 1864, 
and was educated in the schools ot Plain- 
field and Putnam. 

He is eng-aged in farming, in connection 
with which he is a contractor with Mans- 
field Creamery Company for collecting 
the cream in the towns of Tolland and 



Willington, with which company he has 
been connected for the last eight years. 
Mr. Eldredge is Master of the local 
Grange, of which he is a charter member. 
He is also General Agent for the National 
Fertilizer Company of Bridgeport, for 
Tollaiid Count}'. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. 




WILLIAM H. HALL 



William H. Hall, of Willington, was 
born in South Willington in 1867. In his 
education were included courses in the 
Willimantic High School and Wesleyan 
Academy as well as one in Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, from which he graduated in 1892. 



He was a member of the House of 1893, 
and was twice elected Clerk of the Railroad 
Committee ; he has been Town Agent and 
Registrar for two years ; he is engaged in 
thread manufacturing. In party politics 
he affiliates with the Republicans. 



S41 



William Waters Battey is 42 years old, having 
been born September I, 1852. His education he ob- 
tained principally in the common schools; he has 
served his town as first selectman and town agent and 
has been on the board of relief. Earlier in life he 
followed the pursuit of carpentry, but now he is a 
farmer. His politics is Republican. 

Perkins L. Lathrop was born in Willington, June 
II, 1858. He received a common and high school edu- 
cation. The offices he now holds are those of assessor 



and justice of the peace. He has been town auditor, 
constable and school visitor. He has followed the 
calling of farming, teaching school and lumbering. 
He is Democratic in politics. 

George Charles Tennant was born in Manchester 
in 1837 and is 57 years old. His was a common- 
school education. He is now a grand juror in his 
town. He follows the calling of farming and car- 
pentering. In politics he is a staunch supporter of 
the Republican party. 



242 



49th ANNUAL STATEMENT 



OF THE 



Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co. 



OF HARTFORD CONN. 



Net Assets, January 1, 1894 $59,926,199.59 

RECEIVED IN 1894 

For Premiums .... $4,677,972,88 
For Interest and Rents, 3,208,408.28 
Profit and Loss . . . 19,377.25 

§7,905,758.41 

$67,831,958.00 



DISBURSED IN 1894 

For claims by- 
death and ma- 
tured endow- 
ments .... $4,273,874.99 

Surplus return- 
ed to policy- 
holders . . . 1,265,415.20 

Lapsed and Sur- 
rendered 
Policies . . . 659,701.33 



Total to Policy-holders, $6,198,991.52 

Commissions to Agents, Sal- 
aries, Medical E.xaminers' 
fees. Printing, Advertising, 
Legal, Real Estate, and all 
other Expenses 786,039.98 

Taxes 300,528.14 



. 7,285,559.64 

Balance Net Assets, Dec. 31, 1894, $60,546,398,36 



SCHEDULE OF ASSETS 

Loans upon Real Estate, first lien . . . $37,484,848.18 

Loans upon Stocks and Bonds .... 12,300.00 

Premium Notes on Policies in force . . 1,259,444.15 

Cost of Real Estate owned by the Co. . 7,362,583.74 

Cost of United States and other Bonds 12,256,890.25 

Cost of Bank and Railroad Stocks . . . 380,960.25 

Cash in Banks 1,784,032.30 

Bills receivable 1,546.43 

Agents' Ledger Balances 3,793.06 







$60,546,398.36 


Add 






Interest due and accrued 




$991,460.63 


Rents accrued 




7,091.83 


Market value of stocks and 




bonds over cost . . . 




486,721.50 


Net deferred premiums 




203,253.01 




31 


S1 fiftft "ilfi 07 






Gross Assets, December 


1894 . . . $62,234,925.33 



Liabilities : 

Amount required to re-in- 
sure all outstanding Poli- 
cies, net. Company's 
standard $54,221,091,00 

All other liabilities .... 1,187,621.55 



$55,358,712.55 



Surplus $6,876,212.78 



Ratio of expenses of management to receipts in 1894 
Policies in force Dec. 31, 1894, 65,979 Insuring .... 



9.94 per cent. 
$156,686,871.00 



JACOB L. GREENE, President EDWARD M. BUNCE, Sec. 

JOHN M. TAYLOR, Vice-Prest. DANIEL H. WELLS, Actuary 

ALFRED T. RICHARDS, Gen. Agent, Room 10, Company's Building, Hartford, Conn. 

243 



1851 FORTY=FOURTH ANNUAL STATEMENT 1895 

OK THE 

Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company 

OF HARTFORD, CONN. 

JANUARY 1, 1895 



ASSETS. 

Loans on First Mortgages of Real Estate $5,(;33,589.50 

Premium Notes and Loans on Policies in force 701,'2iJ3.Gl 

Loans on Collateral 5,00(1.00 

Cost Value of Real Estate owned by the Company '139,692.77 

City and Municipal and Railroad Bonds and Stocks t2, 096, 802. 71 

Bank Stocks 105,076.00 

Cash in Office 1 98. 93 

Cash Deposited in Banks 376,378.02 

Add. $9,919,261.54 

Market \'aiue of Stocks and Bonds over cost $ 51,722.29 

Interest accrued and due 128,628.73 

Net Deferred and Outstanding Premiums 130,861.94 311,212.96 

Gross Assets, January i, 1895 $10,230,474,50 

LIABILITIES. 

Reserve on Policies in force at 4 per cent, interest (Conn, and 

N. Y. standard) $9,209,959.00 

Claims by death outstanding 18,249.00 

Premiums paid in advance 9,385.66 

Special Policy and Investment Reserves 4 .'"1,380.77 9,662,980.43 

Surplus at 4 per cent $567,494.07 

1892. 1893. 1894. 

Policies issued 3,850 4,769 5,428 

Insurance written $7,909,116 $8,835,062 $9,960,858 

New Premiums received 219,987 225,960 290,939 

Total Premiums received 925,735 1,027,092 1,198,561 

Paid policy-holders..., 1,079,587 1,093,421 1,087,556 

Policies in force 19,788 21,420 22,797 

Insurance in force 30,549,300 33,681,523 36,381,049 



This Company has paid since organization for DEATH LOSSES, 
HATURED ENDOWMENTS, DIVIDENDS TO POLICV=HOLDERS 
and SURRENDERED POLICIES, more than $35,000,000.00. 



JONATHAN B. BUNCE, President CHARLES H. LAWRENCE, Secretary 

JOHN n. HOLCOMBE, Vice-President ARCHIBALD A. WELCH, Actuary 

A. W. BARROWS, H. D., iledical Director 

GEORGE S. niLLER, Supt. of Agencies 



•iu 



INSURE YOUR 



STEAfl BOILERS 



AGAINST EXPLOSIONS 



J. M. ALLEN. 

President. 



W. B. FRANKLIN, 

/ 'ice-President, 




F. B. ALLEN, 

2nd I'kt-Prest. 

J. B. PIERCE, 

Sec'y and Treas. 



Issues Policies of Insurance after a careful inspec- 
tion of the Boilers, covering all loss or damage to 

BOILERS, BUILDINGS, MACHINERY and LIFE 



ARISING FROM 



Steam Boiler Explosions 



The Business of the Company includes all kinds of Steam Boilers. Full 
information concerning the plan of the Company's operations can be 
obtained at the Company's Office, Hartford, Conn., or at any Agency 



THIS COriPANY is the only one engaged in the Steam Boiler Inspection 
and Insurance Business exclusively, whose policies fully 
protect the rights of the Steam user 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



J. M. Allen, President. 

Frank W. Cheney, Treasurer Cheney Bros. Silk Mfg. Co. 

Ch.^rles M. Beach, of Beach & Co. 

Daniel Phillips, of Adams Express Co. 

Richard W. H. Jakvin, Prest. Colt's Fire Arms Mfg. Co. 

Leverett Brain.ard, of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co. 

Gen. Wm. B. Franklin, U. S. Commissioner to the Paris E.xposition. 

Nelson Hollister, of State Bank, Hartford. 



Hon. Henr¥ C. Robinson, Attorney-at-Law, Hartford, Conn. 
Hon. Francis B. Coolev, of the National Exchange Bank, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Edmund A. Stedman, Treas. of the Fidelity Co., of Hartford, Conn. 
George Bcrnham, Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia. 
Ho.N. Nath.\niel Ship.m.\n, Judge United States Circuit Court. 
C. C. Ki.MBALL, Prest. Smyth Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. 
Phillip Corbin, of P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 



HOME OFFICE: 218 MAIN STREET, /ETNA LIFE INSURANCE BUILDING 

345 



r r r^"^ 



t 



i\ 




You will find that the 

ROGERS 



BRAND OF 




Si lver = Plated Ware 

Is Superior in Style, Finish and Plate 

to any other brand of goods on the market. 



ST'^^^-TZZzae 




CHEVALIER TEA SPOON. 



FACTORIES: 

Hartford, Conn. 
Norwich, Conn. 
Taunton, Mass. 



THE WM. ROGERS MFG. CO. 

SALESROOMS AND OFFICE : 

66 to 70 Market St., Hartford, Conn. 



THE TRAVELERS 



OF HARTFORD 



IS THE . 



Leading Accident Company of tlie World 



LARGER THAN ALL OTHERS IN AMERICA TOGETHER 



ISSUES ALSO 



The Best Life Policies in the Market 



REGULAR, ENDOWMENT 

AND ANNUITY 



ASSETS, $17,664,667.68 



SURPLUS, $2,472,534.99 



Pays Policy=Holders Over $2,000,000 Every Year 



JAMES G. BATTERSOX, Prest. 



RODNEY DENNIS, Sec'y 



JOHN E. MORRIS, Asst. Sec'y 



"THE LEADING FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA." 

..^tna Insurance Company. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



IN'CORPORATED 1819 

Cash Capital 

Cash Assets 

Total Liabilities 

Net Surplus 

Losses Paid in 76 Years 



CHARTER PERPETUAL 

$4,000,000.00 
10,847,816.36 

3,649,969.09 

3,197,847 27 
75,142,516.80 



WM. B. CLARK, President 

WM. H. KING, Secretary JAMES ¥'. DUDLEY. Vice-President 

E. O. WEEKS, F. W. JENNESS, Assistant Secretaries 



Western Branch t F. C. Bennett, Gen'l Agent 

171 Vine St., Cincinnati, O. i N. E. Keeler, Asst. Gen"l Agent 



Pacific Branch J Geo. C. Boakdjian, Gen'l Agent 

San Francisco, Cal. I T. E. Pope, Asst. Gen'l Agent 



Northwestern Branch \ Wm. H. Wvman, Gen'l Agent Inland Marine J Chicago, Ills., 172 La Salle Street 

Omaha, Neb. / W. P. H.-vrford, Asst. Gen'l Agent Department i New York, 52 William Street 

*17 



THE WINTHROP PRESS 

32-34 LAFAYETTE PLACE 

NEW YORK 



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